Nebraska herald. (Plattsmouth, N.T. [Neb.]) 1865-1882, July 29, 1880, Image 1

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    r
The Herald.
The Herald.
ID
ADVEBTISItS HATER.
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY,
pack 1 1 w. a w. s w. 1 1 m. I m.i in. I l yr.
AT
1 aqr...
2qr.
Ssqrs.
Jicol.
H col..
1 col...
$1 00
1 SO
200
6 00
800
15 00
1 60 2 00
$2 60
$5 00
..r
PLATTSMOUTH. NEBRASKA.
$4 00
10 00
13 00
$12 01
104
20 08
2 00
2 75
800
12 00
lit 00
8 75
400
823
75
e so
8 00
10 00
1600
2000
12 00
1800
2500
8000
28 00
S5 08
60 00
25 004 40 00
:j OFFICE:
- OS Vina St., One Block North of Main,
Cor. of F'fth Street.
I
Lasst Crishlica of a:y Psr ia Cass Ckarty.
40 00
M00 1 100 08
CT All Advertising Bills Duo Quarter!. .
, ;
tST" Transient Advertlsments must b PI4
In Advance.
JNO. A. MACMURPHY, Editor. J
"PERSEVERANCE CONQUERS.
(TERMS : $2.00 a Year.
Terms in Advance;
One copy, one yu $2.00
One copy, six months 1.00
Onecojjj, three months, SO
J NUMBER 19.
tW Extra Copies of the Hkrald for sale by
J. P. Yucko, at the Fost-Offlee News Depot,
Mala Street.
VOLUME XVI.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY, JULY 29, 18S0.
V
ii
&
V
ft
I -
If
PIBST
National Bank
OF rLATTS. MOUTH. NEBRASKA,
John riT..KitALD ..
I). Ihjvkv
. V. M. i.M CHI.l.V.
JO.VII O KoL ItUK
President.
Vice President.
Cashier.
....Assistant Cashier.
Thi It.mk is now open for business at their
iew r.iom. cnrinT Main and Sixth streets, and
is H piired to transact a general
BANKING BUSINESS.
St .s. Bonds. Gold, Government and Local
Securities
ROUCHT AND SOLD.
Officii? licceiretl and Interest Alloto-
nl on Tim' Certificates.
v ; : :.. ie ill any part of tin; United States and
all the Principal Towns and Cities
of Furnpe. .
a k:ts roil tiii:
CELEBRATED
mm an Line and Allan Lin
OF STKAJIKIW.
l'cfs.in wishing to bring out their friends from
Euro; !- can
I'l IiCHASK IK KKTS FKOM US
T Ii : o u s Ii to I' 1 n t t h m o u t h .
-:t lV: KI'KCIFU' 3Ii:i)l('IK.
TRA".: MARK The Creat Ku-TRADE MARK
, u 1 lsli Keioedy ;
. An imf a i 1 i n g
-k cure for Semi-
"7 ' Weakness,
' .5 i Sperniaton hea
S i rif 1 l o ii'iicy,
;Jw and all iliseas
's that folio
i. VA as a sequence1
nf Self Abuse !
BEFORE TARU3. as Loss of AFTER TAKIMG.
Memory. Universal Lassitude, l'ain in the back
1 Mnii.c -s of Vision, Premature Old Age. and
many ether diseases that lead to Insanity or
Coiis ii'.pt ion, and a Premature Crave.
Jr-'rull particulars in our pamphlet, which
we L it to send free by mail to every one.
trJ"The Specific Medicine is sold by all druggist-4
ai si per package, or six nckngcs for -Sri,
or w ill le sent free ty mail on receipt of the
tn Diiey. by addressing
THE OKAY MEDICINE CO.,
M i; ti ami s' Block, Dktkoit. .Mich.
jrr-sold in Plattsmouth and everywhere, by
all li n'Ms.
If you an a iii.it. of t.u.-ii . wAk. nej by tl:o strain of
you iuui. KTOIU hlllllUUUlUS UiU UM.
U jouarva man rf lctfM, tailing orrr yonrmi1n.g.i
If you are youns ml eu.oi liijr from any tndisrrctlotl
or disMpatioti ; i f yo:i are married or si: pie, old or
?yoauc;, suift rii. rfi-om poor bialtb or laiuub- W
iatt oa aU-1 of t.i. knM, n lj on II
Wtioevryoa are, wherever ynn are. irhpnereryou feel
tunt yonr sv-tein tiods elcRiiBinir tonine or
etiinulatiai;, n itlioat intoxicating, take II
HaTevoii rlviftrpsfa, t-i;fnr-j or itrinary om-laint. dia
eaeottbe nfomi. roi.-r.'. Mrort, fiirr.orawrteal
O Vou will be cmpd if yon use
If vaia'"in'Tily'ind0'nd low spirt tod. try It I Buy 14-
ia-i-t uponit. Yourrtrc.i.r(nitk-rit.
Si may ,u T v jcur
Hn Cm-h frr-1 ihe m'c-l,n.i' i --nl bet. Ak cfaiUrcm.
The I! p 1 ! f'r L -f v h. T . : ver nl I; '-,i r pHor to ll
oitur. Curcii bv rpt:. It i rfrt- Asl. ururia.
I, f. t ja ! lMp ntirrwtlablerv f?r drcnki, wwog
u)--t3 t 'ic- r r-'-'-.ti .
77 ." . i,i lnio- it. 1 u ii l .nen. Co., Tlothetur, N. X .
A vecptible pr.r.ir.ill
ri-nmly i:i ihe worM .
IM:.lirlo, nb:3 ALL
I l inar; iisv:ii'.
JT To'tinioni.'i'si.f tl)
on nnd Hip ot;l.r km
r KtrizliC. f4l
E.iliii-y. I.ier
et;ihtst order in i ro f
of ti.es.; statcunuis.
It ff" For th cure or Kl
ner'M .Sale llabel
eS'Fo: tin? cure or I!
diseases, tall for Vsr
l:.l;rlr, mil for War
Cure.
rislitNt nnd the other
iter's Kale liitiitc.Y
fe IS iii o-
cllvri arc
a ml aJojiler
in IMlicswe
oer.vv.l3rc.
ind Saver cure.
EH.VAENER&CO,
Pn.pi ictors.
Itiwliealcl-. X. V.
Wj9 Scn'1 for Pnniphiot
and Testitnoiuals.
athartic Pills
Com
111 Ti
j Wte
II tl.f.
ine the clioh-est cathartic principles
e-lirine. iu liroixrtious accurately ad
1 to secure activity, certainty, anJ
rm'ry of effect. They are the result
:vs i f careful study anil practical ex.
e '!. an. I are the most effectual rem.
c i (iis -ovi re.l for diseases, caused by
ir-i,t -f the stomach, liver, and
!-, wuliii rcoiiire irointt and effectual
Of vr
";''"
!iia:
1 .'Wo
tr.
l-!;ra;
c ;vc,-l-v-
ti !!.
ti.. -Ills
:i
I:.-
( ! ii V
M.'l1'-
A v
;.. itt. April's Pn.i.s are specially ap-
to thus class of diseases, lliey act
:,- on the digestive and assimilative
j.-. ami restore rejular liealthy ar
'J iu ir extensive use by physicians in
r-ii tice, and by all civilized nations,
of tin- many nmofs of their value as
- . sure. :.nd p. rfoctlv reliable purgative
"i:.-. liein ' .oninoumled of the ccn-
rirtu'"s of purely vegetable sub-
s. ti:ey nre positively free from calo
i;r :i'iy irijnrioiis projH-rties, and can be
r. .l to t lol'lreii witli icricci saieiy
i :: Va.i.s are an effectual cure for
.il:iUosi or Costiveness, Indlges
!i 'M'Cii:v, Ixss of Appetite,
' su :i:ae!i ai;d IJreath, Dizziness,
.aei:c. ixss of Mtiory, Numbness,
:-::v-s-, .Jaundice, Rheumatism,
lion.
I C :
I .
i.i;.
7 .;;.
iic
at
1 iio.is sin. i Skiii Diseases, lropsy,
.us, Worms. Neuralgia. Colic,
es. Di.trrii.ra, lysentery, Gout,
DVso'.-ders of the L,iver. and all
,!..is resnjhijj from a disordered
di:t;iive apparatus.
As a Iiii:nT Till they have no equal.
v T"iiii' i:i rtieir fiction, these i'ills
-
p:i
t le
I-" most t i, or .lit; ii aiui seari nino; cat har
i 1 1. ... ri! l"..l 11. il
a::'es the 1 oweis are inflamed, and
Their hii'Inei!!-.- is healing. They stimu-
l.iT: t"i.. a . Petite : ml digestive organs: thev
r to norifv a. id enrii h the blood, and
i n;v-,-r. r. -n: w.'d health and vigor to the
v. !.,.! ; s; sreru.
Prewired bv Dr. J. C. Aver &. Co..
i'raet;.-' :tutl Analytical Cletnit.ts,
Lowell, Mass.
JLl b ALL URUGOIfJTS EVEHTWEIU.
gpfSfeCWMll stgrnMP SPAVIN
11
-- --- -
Schlegel & Nieman,
Successors to A. Sch leg el & Bko..
Manufacturers of
And dealers in
SMOKERS' FANCY ARTICLES, SMOKING
and CHEWING
TOBACCOS.
Special BRANDS and sizes of CIGARS made to
order, and satisfaction guaranteed. Cigar
clippings sold for smoking tobacco.
Main Street, one door west of J; S. Duke's store
Opposite Pott Offlet,
Plattsmoittii. Neb. lmS
U V Mathews,
DEALER INT
Hardware, Cutlery, Kails,
Iron, Wagon Stock,
2s arm .iEacitttfy.
STOVES and TIN-WARE,
Iron, Wood Stock, Pumps,
Ammunition,
FIELD t- GARDEN' SEEDS, HOPE,
AND ALL KINDS OF SHEET
IRON WORK, Kept in Stock.
Making and Repairing,
DONE WITH
NEATNESS & DISPATCH.
All Work Warranted.
44tl
J. G. CHAMBERS,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
SADDLES,
COLLARS,
HALTERS,
WHIPS
ETC., ETC., ETC.
REPAIRING
Done with Neatness! Dispatch.
Tne only place in town where "Turley's pat
ent self adjustable horse collarsare sold."
49Cni
NEW HARDWARE STORE.
J. S. DUKE
Has just opened an entire new stock of hard
ware, on
Next door west of Chapman & Smith's Druf
Store.
A Full Line of
SHELF HARDWARE,
SHOVELS, RAKES. SPADES ana
ALL GARDEN TOOLS.
NAILS, NAILS, NAILS, ly the Ke
or Pound
ROPE, POWDKll, SHOT, GRIND
STONES,
WHEEL-BARROWS.
A Full Line of crTl.KRY.
Special Rates tc Guilders and Cvrt
ti actors.
All goods soldjas lot e they possibly can be
and live. 41 V
The )l nut MnrrssHf dI KrBlrdV
'ever discovered, ax it Is certain in Us
effect! and does not blister.
RK AD PROOF BELOW.
From Rev. T. N. Granger,
Trending Elder of the St. Alban's District.
St. Albans, Vt.. Jan. 20th, 1880.
Dr. B. J. Kendall & Co.. Cents : In renly to
vour letter I will say that my experience with
Kendall's Spavin Cure has been very satisfac
tory indeed. Three or four years ago I procur
ed a bottle of your agent, and with it cured a
horse of lameness caused by a spavin. Last
season my horse became very lame, and I turn
ed him out for a few weeks when he became
better ; but when I put him on the road he got
worse, when I discovered that a ring-bone was
forming. I procured a bottle of Kendall's
Spavin Cure, and with less than a bottle cured
him so tlrnt he is not lame, neither can the
bunch be found.
Respectfully Yours, F. N. Granokk.
Price .! ner bottle, or six bottles for SS. All
druggists have it or can get it for you, or it will
be sent to any address on receipt of price by
the proprietors, B. J. KENDALL & C'J
iiiiosiiingii raiis. erinoni.
C. F. Goodman, Ag't Omaha, Neb.
GEORGE A. CLARK,
SOLE AGENT.
The BEST and MOST POPtXAB
Hewing Thread of Modern Times.
BEWARE OF J3HTATTOXS.
For sale bv E. t. Dovey & Son, SoloniOD Jfc
Nathan. Wmllerold, W. II. Baker & Co.. L.
Kaliskv & Son.
SAGE BROTHERS,
Dealers in
STOVES,
ETC., ETC., ETC.
One Door East of the Post-Ortlce, I'JattsiuQuth,
.Nebraska.
' IOi
Practical Workers in
SHEET IRON, ZINC, TIN. BRA
ZIERY, &c., d'C
Large assortment of Hard ana Soft
Pumps, Gass Pipes and Fittings.
dOAL STOTE3,
Wood and Coal Stoves for
HEATING OR COOKING,
Always on Hand.
Cvry variety of Tin, Sheet Iron, and Zinc
Work, kept in Stock.
MAKING AND REPAIRING,
Done on Short Notice.
syErEJirrHLYG . warilaxted i issi
PKICEH LOW DOWX.
SAGE BROS.
USB
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
1R. JT. L.. 3-IeCKEA,
HOMtEPATHIC PHYSICIAN, at Factory
Tille, Cass county, Nebraska. 24ly
T. IB. WILSON,
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Practices In Saun
ders and Cass Counties. Ashland, Nebraska.
35ui6
B. B. WISUIIAJ1,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, Plattsmouth. Neb. Of
ficeFront Room over Chapman & Smith's
Drug Store. ly
M. A. 1IABTIAX.
ATTORNEY AND SOLICITOR. Will Prac
tice In th State and Federal Courts. Resi
dence. Plattsmouth. Nebraaka. tlly
B. B. LIVIHTOX. 31.
PHYSICIAN as SU.RGEOX.
OFFICE HOURS, from 10 a. m., to 2 p. ni.
Examining Surgeon for U. 3. Pension.
Ilt. W. II. HCHILIIKSiFXHT,
PRACTISING PHYSICIAN, residence on
Chicago Avenue. Plattsmouth. Nebrsaska.
Office in C. E. Wescott's Clothing Store. lly
IB. K. K. nEYXOLD S,
ALLOPATHIC PHYSICIAN at Rock Bluff.
Cas County, Neb., will attend calls promptly
at all hours. l'2
Wltjli S. WISE.
COLLECTIONS M. SFUCZAZTT.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Real Estate. Fire In
surance and Collection Agency. Oftlee in Fitz
gerald's block. Plattsinouth,Nebraska. 22in3
tiEO. S. SMITH.
ATTORNEY AT LAW and Real Estate Bro
ker. Special attention given to Collections
and all matters affecting the title to real estate.
Office on 2d floor over Post Office. Plattsmouth.
Nebraska. 4L
U. II. WHEELiEB A CO.
LAW OFFICE, Real Estate, Fire and Life In
surance Agents. Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Col
lectors, tax -payers. Have a complete abstract
of titles. Buy and sell real estate, negotiate
loans, &c. ' I5y
JOIIX MIBFIX.
NOTARY PUBLIC Will attend to buying
and selling lands, examining, titles, making
deeds, paying taxes and collecting debts. Will
also attend to law suits before a Justice ! tne
IftC
47tf ' Factortvillk, Cass Co. Nkb.
SAM. M. CIIAPMAUT,
ATTORNEY AT I AW,
And Solicitor In Chancery. Office m Fitzger
ald Block,
19yl PLATTSMO DTH, NEB.
JAMES K. MORRISOX, . TV. L. BROWNE.
notary nioiic.
MOBBISOX A BBOWXE.
.TTnnveva . T t 4 W Will ..r-a -it. on in Piisa
and adjoining Counties ; gives special attention
to collections and abstracts of title. Office iu
r itzgeraiu Uiock, i-iattsmouin, iseurasa.
1 1 v .
STEVEXHOX A 3IIKHS,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Plattsmonth and
Nebraska C'tv. Neb.
Til os. B. Rtkvenson, I E. J.-Mcrkin.
Nebraska city, over snnm ai ttiaca. 9
Neb. I Drug SUire,
13ly I Plattsmouth, Neb.
i XV. CLJJTTEB.
DB1TTIST.
Plattsmouth. Xebrasksv.
Office on Main Street over Solomon ft Na
than's Store. 341y
PLATTSMOUTH MILLS.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEB.
C. II CIS EI,, - Proprietor.
Flour, Corn Meal cfc Feed
Always on hand and for sale at lowest cash
Ericrs. 1 lie iiigut-ai iiutt3 p.u
orn. Particular attention given custom worK.
CHARLES n'ARKEX.
Tonsorial Artist.
PliATTSMOL'TH SEBHASRA.
Place of business on Main St.. between 4th
and 6th streets. Shampooing, Shaving, chil
dren's hair cutting, etc. etc. 191y
FRED. D. LEUNHOFF,
Morning Dew Saloon !
South-east corner Main and Sixth Streets.
Keep the best of
Beer, Wines, Liquors & Cigar
33m9 Constantly on Hand.
BRICK! BRICK!
If you want any
Fire or Ornamental Brick,
Call on
J. T. A. HOOVER,
LOUISVILLE, - - NEBRASKA.
BATES & KOHNKE.
TSrew Carpenter Shop on Main Street,
Corner of 7th.
BUILDERS CONTRACTORS
AND
GENERAL WORKMEN
In the Carpenter line.
MACHINE SHOPS I
JOHN" W-A--X"2wr-A.33"
PLATTSMOUTH, NEB.,
Repairer of Steam Engines, Boilers,
Saw and Grist Mill
iAS AXD STEAM FITTi-wtlS,
fronght Iron Pipe. Force and Lift Pipes.Steam
Gauges, Safety-Valve Governors, and all
kinds of Brass Engine Fittings,
repaired on short notice.
FARM MACHIJVEK"T
Excelsior Barber Shop.
J. C. BOONE,
One door west of SoloraonlAjNatriau's Store.
SHAVING AND SHAMPOOING
Especial attention given to
CUTTING CHILDREN'S AND LA
DIES' HAIR.
ALL AND SEE BOONE, GENTS,
And get a boon in a
oi:e-a-it shave
WILLIAM HEROLD,
dealer In
DRY GOODS,
. CLOTHS.
BLANKETS.
FLANNELS,
FURNISHING GOODS
:o:
GROCERIES OF ALL KINDS.
Large stock of
BOOTS and SHOES
to be
CLOSED OUT "AT COST
:o:
Notions, Queensware,
and in fact everything you can call tor in
the line of
General Merchandise.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES AND FURS.
y
All kinds of country oroduce taken in ex
change for goods.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
State Directory.
A. S. PADDOCK. U. S. Senator, Beatrice.
a I X'TV . ITVDCVJ TT A Canotnp Hmolia
E, K. VALENTINE, Representafe. West Point.
AI.BIN US NAMK, Governor. Lincoln.
8. J. ALEXANDER, Secretary of State.
F. W. LEIDTKE, Auditor. Lincoln.
O. M. BARTLETT. Treasurer, Lincoln.
S. R. THOMPSON. SupL Public Instruction.
F. M. DAVIS. lAnd Commissioner.
c .1. DI I.WORTH. Attornev General.
REV. C. C. HARRIS. Chaulain of Penitentiary.
DR. H. P. MATTHEWSON, Supt Hospital for
the Insane.
Supreme Court.
S. MAXWELL. Chief Justice, Fremont.
GEO. B. LAKE, Omaha.
AMASA COBB, Lincoln.
o
Second Judicial District.
S. B. POUND. Judge. Lincoln.
J. C. WATSON. ITosecuting-Att'y, Neb. City.
W. C. SHOWALTER, Clerk District Court, -Plattsmouth.
o
County Directory.
A, N. SULLIVAN, County Judge.
J. D. TUTT. County Clerk.
J. M. PATTERSON, County Treasurer.
R. W. HYERS. Sheriff.
E. H. WOOLEY.Co. Sup't Pub. Instruction.
G. W. FAIRFIELD. Surveyor.
P. P. GASS, Coroner.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
jamks CRAWFOItD. South Bend Precinct.
S AM'L RICHARDSON. Mt. Pleasant Precinct,
ISAAC WILES, riattsmoutn rrecinei.
City Directory.
J. W. JOHNSON, Mayor.
J. M. PATTERSON, Treasurer.
J. D. SIMPSON. City Clerk.
RICHARD VIVIAN. Police Judge.
P. B. MURPHY. Chief of Poliee.
F. E. WHITE, Chief of Fire Dept.
COUNCILMEN.
1st Ward-F. GORDER. C. H. PARMELE.
2d Ward-G W. FAIRFIELD, J. V. WECK-
l. BACH
3d Ward D. MILLER, THOS. FOLLOCK.
4th Ward P. McCALLAN. E. S. SHARP.
2'otmaster-JNO. W. MARSHALL.
B. & M. R. RTime Table.
Taking Effect April 11, 1880.
FOR O MAH A FROM PLATTSMO UTH.
leaves 8 ."o a. m. Arrives 10 :05 a. ra.
3 :4J p. tn. " 5 :00 p. ni.
FROM OMAHA FOR PLATTSMO Cin.
Leaves 9 :00 a. m. Arrives 10 :10 a. m.
" J0 p. iu. " 8:15 p. in.
FOR THE WEST.
Leaves Plattsmouth 9 0 a. m. Arrives Lin.
coin, 12 -15 p. m. ; Arrives Kearney, 7: 40 p. m.
c..A...K, 1a-.ua. ul in a m sill.l nt 7 'AS n. HI
Arrive at Lincoln at 4 :35 p. m. and 12 :20 a. m.
FROM THE WEST.
Leaves Kearney. 6 :00 a. in. Leaves Lincoln
i. . , f 1 ... ,1 .-IK, ni .1 tl iT A .AO
a. m. Arrives at riausiuwuiu ai j p.
e :au a. ra.
GOING EAST.
Yiuiwnver. (train each dav) 4Sp. in., except
f, t...r t" .. .. i,i,.ri ,r i.r.liv a t r u I ti pnn.
oaiuiuny. i,eijr .u..u ...v
nects at the usual time.
II. v. R. II. Time Table.
Taking Effect Sunday, April 11, 1880.
WEST.
6 :35pm
6 :07
G :28
7 :05
7:23
7 :35
8 KM)
8 :15
8 :50
9 :05
9 :20
9 :4t
9 :56
STATIONS.
HASTINGS.
AYR.
BLUE HILU
COWLKS.
AM BOY
RED CLCUD.
IN A VALE.
RIvERTON.
FRANKLIN.
BLOOMI NGTON.
PERTH
REPUBLICAN
ALMA
fve ORLEANS
OXFORD
ARAPAHOE
EAST.
8 :ioam
7 :40
7 :20
6 AO
6 :32
6 :20
6 KK)
5 :43
6 :22
5 :09
4 :55
4 :35
4 :20
4 .-ooam
4 .30 pm
3 :30
2 :00pm
10 :15
7 :30an
9 :00
10 M
ARRIVAL AXB WEPARTL'BE OP
PLATTSMO I'T II MAILS.
EASTERN, NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN.
I Depart. East. .4 : oo pm
Arrive 9 :30 am CBaKC North4 :00 pin
7:30pmi nouin o : u aiu
I C B & Q East 0:00 am
OMAHA, VIA B. M. IN NEB.
Arrive 10 : 30 am Depart 3:10 pm
WESTERN, VIA B. & M. IN NEB.
Arrive 4 : 15 pm Depart 9 : 30 am
WEEPINO WATER.
Arrive 11 :00 am Depart 1 :00 pm
ROCK BLUFFS AND UNION MILLS.
Arrive 11 :00am Depart 1 :00pm
J. W. Marshall. P. M.
H W CELEBRATED
.Serve an Injunction on Disease
By invigorating a feeble constitntion, renovat
ing a debilitated physique, and enriching a
thin and innutritlous circulation with Fostet
ter's Stomach Bitters, the finest, the most high
ly sanctioned, and the most popular tonic and
preventive In exictence.
For sale by all Druggists and Dealers
generally. ,
The Only Really Reliable Remedy for
Wasting1 and IS'erYons Diseases.
After numerous experiments, Mr. Fellows
succeeded in producing this combination of
nypophosphites. which has not only restored
him tt health but has since been found so suc
cessful iu the treatment of every other disease
emanating from los of nerve power, and con
sequently muscular relaxation, viz :
Aphonia
Apparent Aqouia
Anaemia
Argina Pectoris
Chronic Diarrhoea
Dyspepsia
Dyptheretic Prostra
tion Epileptic Fits
Fever and Ague
Leucorrhoea
Marasmus
Mental Depression
Nervousness
Neuralgia
Nervous Debility
St. itus' Dance
Whooning Couch
Congestion of the Lungs
Emaciation
Palpitation of the Heart
Interrupted and Feeble
Action of the Heart
Melancholv
Fear of Child Birth
Dangers of Child Birth
Liability to Miscarriage
Hypochondriasis, etc
Diseases produced by overtaxing the mind ;
by grief and anxiety ; by rapid growtl: ; by
child-bearing ; by insufficient nourishment ; by
residence in hot climates or unhealthy locali
ties ; by excesses, or by any Irregularities of
life.
Sold by all Drnsrists. $1.50 per Bottle.
OPIUM
mni HORPniNEbiUKL
l.l.ly mnd .peed.!, curad. l'.
Im. N. publicity. Kuf
ft rail partica!ar. Dr Crtaa,
SO 8. Clark L,XaiCH IU'
STOMACH
iS( COMPOUND SYRUP JH3
Vatio7zal (&epzzbZiczrL Ticlzet
For President of tie United States,
GEN. JAMES A. GARFIELD.
m QJZ OHIO.
TEMPERANCE WORK
ONWARD
Monday night, July 19th, the mass meeting, under the auspices of the
Red Ribbon Club, was addressed by the editor of the Herald. The audi
ence was a large and appreciative one. The lecture was plain, practical and
pointed, free from balderdash or attempt at oratory, yet delivered in a forci
ble and pleasing manner, and we gladly
the editor protest. On the whole, the
closing up with a grand good collection for the Library fund.
EXTRACTS FROM J. A. MACMURPnY'S LECTURE "PREVENTION OF
INTEMPERANCE.'
Published by Request.
LAW.
"Would you do away with law entirely then -asks some one?"
By no means, a good law, at the proper time, properly enforced may be a
great cure for intemperance; but I am not now speaking of a cure but the
preventation of Intemperance before it comes to the stage when panaceas
are necessary.
You would not expect me in one short Lecture to exhaust a subject that
has occupied the minds and thoughts of men and women for years and upon
which tomes have been written. I am not now discussing the benefits or de
merits of a Prohibitory Law.
That comes in at a later stage as either a cure or a punishment; for even
if law be looked upon as a preventative, it comes too late in most
cases to act with any degree of certainty and effect. We need the preven
tion, the education of the young 1.0 lead up to the enactment and enfore
meut of the law.
SCHOOLS
The education of the Common schools should do much to prevent the
spread of Intemperance, and it seems to me, might in this way.
Of late years there has been too much namby-pambyism about the Gov
ernment of scholars in public schools by teachers.
If a teacher whips in the least, an ill-mannereJ, unruly and wilful child,
a great hou-doo is created about it. The parent or the guardian talks about
the law, in big italics, and threatens what he will do next time if any teach
er touches his child. If teachers now, as they used to should interfere with
the manners or morals f their scholars out of school .hours, he or she would
have to be strong in their position or "the Board" would be obliged to oust
them. This sentiment has been growing I am sorry to say. It should be cor
rected by wholesome public criticism.
There is not a man over 40 in this house probably, that was not flogged
unmercifully sometimes by his teacher and even the big girls had to tafce it,
occasionally. Will one of them say here
for it mentally, physically or morally?
Manv of the older members of society will remember their father savincr:
'Go to school, my Boy and mind the teacher. If you cut up and he whips you
don't come home to me to growl, iov I'll giye you another." How seldom is
that said now, on the contrary I have heard parents send children to school
with the injunction, that if the "Teacher licked 'em just let me know and I'll
lick him."
"Would you return to Barbarism,
ging school of the past? I bear some
By no means. .Let me ue a little
Sir-ee.
But I would return to that time
authority over the child in the school and out, and the means of enforcing
positive and exact obedience, by some rule or punishment to be decided only
by the proper authority and backed up by parent and Board engaging teach
ers, alike, and a little wholesome corporal punishment is the best aid to the
memory m preventing obstreperousness
Divest yourselves of all prejudice,
States for every recorded case of excessive cruelty to children by teachers,
and see how really few there are. Turn
many punishments you ever got that you
However it is not to encourage punishment of any kind that I have thus
written, but t& establish authority, which is fast waning
Under your present system the teacher is justiGed if ho gets along as
easily as possible in regard to the morals and manners of pupils, and only
crams them with a half education. Satisfying the captious and sometimes
ignorant parents with a wonderful parrot memory at exhibition times and
examinations.
What has this to do with Temperance?
Just this: If we are to educate our young people to habits of moderation
and control, it must be done at all times
those having charge of them for nearly
teacher.
. Parents may do much at home, but
the teacher's influence at school.
But greater than this many parents
them, to educate them.
We pick up in our common schools
parents that have no control of themselves, their appetites er their tempers,
or of their children. These mix and mingle with all other children, and con.
taminate the growing community.
Why do we have expensive .Normal
them?
To educate teachers in the best methods of teaching -what?
Beadiner, writing, and the olegies.
Pretty much all, nowadays; for, as a rule, they dare not cerrect a child
for anything done out of school, or apart
We pay great monies to support our
what? .
The growing man or woman to become a better citizen, a better Chris
tian; to control their passions; to in
often do we pay for this, or get this kind
The teacher ehould be taught to govern and obey, to impart wholesome
morals and instructions by words, by
To govern their own temper, and
favor or malice. First qualify your teachers.
Thus equipped, the scholars in their charge
trol more or less from the time f leav;ng school
oneer would often la beneficial. That
to enquire into the conduct and habits
authority to regulate and correct abuses for bad habits, bad morals, foul
speech at all times, as well as during school hours, and to punish tor disobe
dience of moral and cleanly rules as authoritatively as for mere neglect of
classes or lack of scholarship.
Because many parents cannot do
trol over their children (nor over themselves, as stated), and it ruins the
whole flock on no other basis have you
childless, of the aged with no children
much abused class old maids as taxes to educate your children with, un
less you do make them better, safer, puier citizens so that they need less
watching through life, are self-helpful,
to the community rather than a burden, increasing police expenses, and fur
nishing recruits for haunts of vice and crime.
And in no way can the cause of Temperance be more surely advanced
than by this early teaching of self control, real temperance and self-pride
that scorns to be degraded or pauperized.
Let us then call the schools to our
not be so infernally afraid of a little religion or morality being taught in our
public Institutions. "We dwell on this because we have little faith in curing
old Drunkards by law or suasion, but great hope, by the right course of not
making more
SALOONS.
From the School room to the Saloon is a vast step in mental and moral
calesthenics and yet how short the jump often is in reality, for many a young
man of naturally good habits and the promise of a bright future before him.
Shortly after I joined this society I informed a friend of the fact, and he
expressed himself as greatly pleased-&u. says hs: "don't make a fool of your
self Mac. and make temperance a business and above all don't go to temper
ance lecturing."
I said I wouldn't and meant it; though I have come very near it to-night.
Lest I should drift into the ordinary course of temperance Lecturers
and proceed to curse and denounce the "vile traffic." and picture the demon
Rumseller standing in ghastly devilisbness at his font of death, retailing the
poison that damns mens souls, ruins their families, blights their business
For Vice-President of tne United States.
4 I
GEN. CHESTER A. ARTHUR.
OF -X-OiaiC.
IN PLATTSMOUTH.
IT JI0YES!
give it place in "Our Column." though
meeting was one of marked success.
to-night that he is really the worse
to the whipping-post and the flog
ask in dismay.
emphatic and even slangy and say No-
when the teacher had a wholesome
that I know of.
friends, and look over the United
to your own memory and see how
did not deserve.
in all places when needed, and by
one-third of their early days the
it will be retarded if not backed by
are not fit to have children, to own
all kinds of children children of
schools t Why levy taxes to support
from its lessons.
common school system. To teach
turn train their children aright not
of education.
habit and by manner.
to punish judiciously without fear.
should be under their con-
uutil they reach home, and
is to say.
they should have the right
of pupils during these hours and have
this, do not exercise a particle or con
the right to take the money of the
to educate and the earnings of that
virtuous, temperate and a help and aid
aid in preventing intemperance and
and turns the fair Garden of God's green earth into a charnel house of dead
perfumes; of rank fusil Oil, stale tobacco and the dead ashes of every hope
and joy that makes life worth living for, I pause here. You see I have got
the "lingo," and have no doubt I could write a pretty good average. Temper
ance Lecture but lest I should drop into this as Silas Wegg did into poetry
I shall leave this subject for other and older converts.
You can get plenty of Temperance men to talk to you of these evils, in
fact there is no argument on the ether side, in favor of Saloons, as generally
conducted and I never heard any sensible man make any.
It is more in the light of political economy, which is my forte, if I have
an', that I shall treat of saloons to-night, and from a historical point of
view as bearing on this question.
The Saloon, for the sale of intoxicating drinks exclusively, is of modern
growth comparatively, and of foreign Importation entirely. Its name indi
cates its origin, it is of French extraction and like many other fashions and
habits introduced into this country from there might well be dispensed with.
Where I was brought up in New Jersey, 80 years ago, there was not a
Saloon in existence, 25 years ago, they were scarce, and yet it was a liquor
drinking country, for "Apple Jack" was to the manor born.
It was sold almost exclusively in and from the bar of the old fashioned
COUNTRY TAVERN.
Its use and abuse was greatly curtailed thereby because the old fash
ioned Tavern-keeper was generally a man of property, and means, of good
standing in the community, frequently owned a fine farm or ran a store in
connection with. his tavern; and he would not sell to any body and every
body. It was understood that the few samples he kept were for the use of
travellers mostly-supposed to be tired with a long days ride, or not used to
the water, or having the colic from sampling too many peach orchards or water-melon
patches as they come abong.
There was no tempting array of bottles on t he shelf and grainod walnut
or mahogany counter.
. The whisky was kept in a little corner cupboard, as a rule, with two
common tumblers by the side of the bottle. The Landlord carried the keys
to the cup-board there was no bartender and unly those whom he saw fit,
and who could take a dram and "go of!" got anything out of our old fashion
ed whisky-seller.
In short, he did not have to sell Liquor for a business and to make bread
and butter for his family as the Modern Saloon Keeper does and consequent
ly was indifferent whether he sold much or little and never urged men to
drink.
He had other means of support
and as it was mostly home made with no government license, to pay, and
cheap, there was no inducement to tempt men to drink more than they want
ed, or lay round much for treats.
I do not say all were so, there were
most of them never conducted the business, alone, depended entirely on it
for support, and were licensed to sell
In just so much as this was the case were the evils of excessive drinking
felt and hated and gradually the business became disreputable. - One after
another the old Landlords closed the "bar" forever
Did it stop drinking? I wish I
loon came into fashion, the place set
distinct from any other business.
The place to get drunk as a young
and from that day to this a lower grade of men, a lower grade of liquor and
a lower grade of Drinkers, as a rule, have appeared in and about the business.
The abolishment of the bar from
Landlord, made his wife and daughters members of good society, and turned
the tavern into a Hotel do doubt; but it has cursed the world with a worse
more persistant and harder to cure system of drinking than we ever had
before.
Just how we'll set about to do it
mention in a casual way. that if we
saloon business, License and all, it would be a great prevention to Intemper
ance Perhaps the best, the greatest, the "deadest sure" thing of all
That's your problem, however, good people; and and perhaps mine-
after to-night.
We have received from Scribner &
Co. a copy of "Spiritual Songs for the
Sunday School," selected and arranged
by Rev. Chas. S. Robinson, and pub
lished by Scribner & Co, 743 and 745
Broadway, New York.
The publishers announce their ob
ject in issuing this work to be to sup
ply a convenient and attractive vol-.
urn, which shall avoid tbe superficial '
and ephemeral in music, and a feeble,
unhealthy sentiraentalism in words, so ;
prevalent in the flood of books which '
have swept down upon Sunday School
ranks of late years, and substitute in
stead a selection, all of which shall be j
good, and ranging from such grand 1
lyrics as "Holy, holy, holy, Lord God
Almighty," arrangements of Mendels
sohn, Handel, Rossini, and other class
ical composers, down to tbe simpler
tunes to suit less cultivated tastes.
We commend the work to our read
ers for examination, feeling that reli
able publishers like Scribner & Co., ;
will not offer the public anything
which is not excellent of its kind.
ITEMS OF INTEREST.
Maple sugar made from the sap of a
tice in Williamstown, Vt.,at the roots
of -which the brine from the farmers
beef and pork barrels had been emptied
last autumn, was so 6alty as to be use
less. The three sons of Z. D. Bowcn of
Wadkv, Ga.,all use crutches. Their
bones are so soft and brittle as to often
bre.ik from even a sliirli t iar. The old
est, Sylvester, has already sustained 26
fractures.
A candidate for tlie office'of Record
er of Jasper County, O., solicited votes
on the ground that, if elected he would
return half of his salary to the public
treasury. He was elected, but the du
preine Court has declared the election
void, because the inducement that he
offered to voters was in the nature of a
bribe. "
Mr. Waring, a recent candidate at an
English election, adopted a neat mode
of stigmatizing an opponent. He
asked those he addressed what they
sailed a man who made such and such
charges, knowing them to be false.
The response came back: A nar.
"Well," said the candidate, "I will not
contradict vou."
Crucifix, the winner of the Oaks for .:
Lord Gconre Bentwick, did more in
less time than any horse that ever had
appeared on the English turf up to ;
his time. He ran twelve times in as ;
many months without ever having )
been beaten, and won ten thousand two
huudrcd and eighty-seven pounds in
public stakes. The triumphs of Cru
cifix were all achieved between July
9, 1839, and June 5, 1840, considerably
less than twelve months.
Archbishop Purcell said, in a recent
sermon at Cincinnati : "1 now solemn
ly declare before Almighty God and
this congregation, that not one dollar
of the money that was intrusted to my
care was lavished in luxury by myself
or agents, or expended in any manner
for our personal benefit; and no mat
ter how unworthily 1 may appear in
your eyes, 1 humbly ask that you pray
to Almighty God for me." His health
ha3 been very bad since the financial
disaster in his diocese.
The will of Mr. Alfred Gilbcy, win
merchant of Loudon, was lately prove
ed at 1,750,000 personal estate. Mr.
Gil bey owed his success to honesty
and advertising. On one .occasion a
wealthy baronet resolved to have some
cheap and excellent sherry sold to
him by Gibley analyzed, intending if
found impure, to publish the fact. It
proved absolutely pure, and the letter,
he wrote to Gibley about it served as
splendid advertisement. The firm
occupy immense premises, formerly
the Pantheon Bazaar, Lu Oxford, street,
London.
always than the profits on his whisky.
rum-holes then and there, but the
Liquors and had no other business.
could say that it did but no! The Sa
apart and licensed to sell separate and
Irishman said here, once, sprang up
the old taverns respectabilized the
then. I don't know, but I would like to
could abolish our saloons, and the whole
Gambling: Abroad.
Terrible stories are told of the gamb
ling saloons which infest the Conti
nent. At these resorts, fortunes, trust
money, provision for children and wi
dows, the sums acquired by the sale
of commissions, sums raised on house
and laud, have disappeared in a few
days or hours. Often it is extrava
gance of the companion that drives her
victim back and back to the tables,
deeper and deeper. But the women
themselves are the most reckless gam
blers. The common computation is a
6uicide a mouth, and there sometimes
come three or four together. On the
ramparts of the garden of Monaco
there are several points from which
ruined gamblers have thrown them
selves into the sea, 300 feet. Some
suicides occur at the gambling table
itself. For the reception of such scan
dals there is provided a room, handy
for the railway which passes almost
directly under the Casino. Some in
quests "there must be, and it- is per
formed by the servants of the estab
lishment. But most of the victims go
away and hide themselves and die like
a sick dog in some corner, where they
hasten death or let a broken heart take
its course. It is impossible even to
conjecture the total amount of the an
nual ruin ; nor is that an important
matter, for a loss of a few hundred is
as utter ruin to some people as tens of
thousands is to others. When a man
cannot meet his creditors, or even his
wife and children, it is all over with
him, unless he is devoid of natural
feeling and dead to shame. The mere
excitement of a day's gambling has
been known to kill people constitu
tionally weak of heart or head, wheth
er they have wou or lost. Ecstacy
works the effect of despair in such
cases. Of all passions, that of gamb
ling is the most absorbing and dajigcr-
ous.
OSU AJlliJUS. 1
The reputashun that a man gits from
hiz anscstors, often wants az inutch
altering to fit him, az their old clothes
would.
It Lz a wizo man who profits bl hiz
own experience but it iz a good deal
wizerone, who lets the rattlcsnaik bite
the other phellow.
Take all the phools out or this
world, and thar wouldn't be enny
plain, nor prolfit living in it.
I never question a suukcess enny
more than 1 do the right ov a bull dog
to lie in hiz own gateway. No I don't.
Whcu a wize man undertakes to do
a kunniug thing, he al linos t all ways
makes a.mizcrable failure ov it.
Marridlife iz a little game, in which
the woman, if 6he iz called, iz al linos t
sure to liav a strate flush.
The man who knows a thing, and
can tell it in the fewest words, iz tho
hardest kind ov a man to beat in a
kross examinashun.
When a man sets down a poor um
breller, and takes up a good one he,
makes a mistake; but when he sets
down a good umbrcller, and takes up
a poor one, he makes a blunder.
The things that i kant prove i De
leave the most, i beleave one apple iz
sour,- and another one sweet, but I will
giv enny highly eddikatcd man, a span
of matched mules, who will tell mo
what makes them so.
The smartest thing about enny man
iz hiz consilience, he may outargy hiz
reason, or stutify hiz faith, but he kant
beat his confluence.
Thare iz only one thing that kan bo
sed iu favour of titc Boots they make
a uian lorgit all his other sorrows.
Caushun iza good thing for a man
to hav, but when he haz got so mutch
ov it, that he is air.ule to tutch a kast
iron lion, lor fear it will bit?, igno
rance iz what's the matter ov him.
Thare aint nothing that a man will
thrive so well on az abuse that ain't
merited.
Whenever yu cum akrost a man who
distrusts everyboddy, yu hav f.uid
one whom it is safe for every ioUdy to
distrust.
. i i,:iti -
ft