Nebraska herald. (Plattsmouth, N.T. [Neb.]) 1865-1882, March 07, 1878, Image 1

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    THE HERALD.
ID
PUBLISHED VEEV THURSDAY
a: vi:icTiMi it-ATI-:.
AT
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA
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1 str. . .
2 si j is..
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$1 H'i1-r '.' 00 llfthMWl-MId $15 Off
I fan i.0.1 2 7f! 3"f.' ! 10 00' 1CF
200, ar.'i' 4 00i 4 T.V iM:il300: 1
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OFFICE:
On Vine St., One Block North of Main,
Corner of Fifth Street.
JNO. A. MACMURPHY, Editor.
" PERSEVERANCE CONQUERS.
(TERMS: $2.00 a Year.
JiT-All Advertising bills due quarterly.
fiTriinsiMit advertisements must lie pali
for in advance.
IjAimiEmt rmcr;r,ATio' ok axi
iaii;ki." cans coixty.
Ttrm, lit Advance:
Onf copv, one year
One ropy, six months
One copy, three month
$2.00
l.oo
50
VOLUME XIII.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY MARCH 7, 1878.
NUMBER 50.
Extra cr pics of (he Hf rat. r for sain by ,T. I".
omij;. Postofilce new depot, iill'i O. F.'jollll
soii.coincr of .Main and Fifth Ktrt-u.
THE HERALD.
PIES T
National Bank
OF PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA,
SITCF.SSOR TO
TOOTW; nAXXA A CL A It K
.tOBK FlTZr.KRAUl
K. !. Dovkv
A. W. McLAI.'Oill.I.V...
Josh o'Rocukk
. . President.
Vice President.
Cashier.
..Assistant Cashier.
Thin Bank I now open for business at their
new room, corner Main and Sixth streets, aud
is prepared to transact a general
BANKING BUSINESS.
Stocks, Bonds, Gold. Government and Local
Securities
BOUGHT AND SOLO.
Deposit Received and Interest Allow
ed on Time Certificates.
dbafts iDZRrwnsr,
Available in anv part of the United States and
lu all the Principal Towns and Cities
of Europe.
ACiCVTS I'OU THE
CEI.ERP.ATEI
Inman Line and Allan Line
OF HTKAMKIt.
Person wishing to bring out their friends from
Europe can
I'VUCif ASK TICKETS FROM C8
Thronzh to Ilattmoutli.
CD
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55 ;
Excelsior Barber Shop,
j. c. BOONS,
Main Strert, opposite .'iiml' rs Hons.
TIAIE-CTJTTIITG-,
p i: a v i x ; a x i s n a m r ) o i x ;
I'-peci.iI attention iven t
f l'TTIXi! rHH.nilEX'H -I.V LA
TH AS HAIR.
CA!.!. AND SET. IiOONK. (IKXTS,
And cH a I fn.i-.e i:i a
rrtoiTiiKTou r
PALACE BILLIARD HALL
(Jli'm St., east of First X.tt. Pank.
ri.ATTSMorrii. - nkb.
my i'.ak is svrri.ir.D with thk
BEST WINKS. I.KiroKS, niiAKS,
4l,y, BEEIt, F.TC, ETC.
3roTj"3srTDT,-5r
MACIIIXE SHOPS !
JOHN WAYlvlAlir,
ri.ATTSMOUTII, 'K15.,
'Repairer of Steam Rnyinrs, JJoihrs,
Saw and Urixt Mil If
;AH AXI) HTKAM HTTIUJS,
Wrou-.'ht Iron Pii.e. Force and Lift Pipes Steam
;aii"es.Safetv-Valve Governors. and ad
kinds of Brass Enf-'ine Uttinss.
repaired ou short notice.
FARM MACHINEKt
Berried on Short Notice. i'-'il
"YOUNG!"
THE B U T CHER,
Can always he found at
Halt's Old Stand,
Ready to sell the best Meats.
YOt'Nfi buvs fresh fat cattle, sheep, lioe &e.
direct from the fanners every day, and his
meats aro always good.
CAVE, riSII, AXD FOWL, IX SEAS0X
3yl.
SAGE BROTHERS,
Dealers in
STOVES,
ETC., F.TC, ETC,
One Poor East of the Post-omce, Platumouth,
Nebraka.
: O :
Tragical Workers In
BIIEET I R0X, ZIXC, TJX, BRA
ZIERY,&e.,dc large assortment of Hard and Sort
COAL STOVES,
Wood and Coal Btoves for
HEATING OR COOKING,
Alway on Iland.
every Tarietv of Tin. Sheet Iron, and Zinc
Work, kept In Stock.
MAKING AND REPAIRING,
Done on Short Notice.
KSTErERTTBIXO WARRAXTED t
PRICES LOW OOAVX.
SAGE BROS.
PROFESSIONAL' CARDS
MA 51, 31. C II A PIT A .V,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
And Solicitor in Chancery. Office in Fitzger
ald Block,
loyl rf.ATTSMOUTH, NEB.
I. II. WIIRELER A CO.
I. AW OFFICE. Beal Estate, Fire and Life In
surance Agents. Plattsiiioulh, Nebniska. Cd-l-c
tors, tax -payer. Have a complete abstract
of titles. Buy and sell real et-tate, negotiate
loans. 4c Idyl
JAMES K. JIORRIKOX.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Will practice in Cass
and ndjoinini; Counties ; gives special attention
to collections and abstracts of title. Office with
(leu. S. Smith, Fitzgerald Block, Platteraouth,
Nebraska. lTyl
CO. H. H3IIT1I.
ATTORXKY AT LAW and Real Estate Bro
ker. Special attention given to Collections
and all matters affecting the title to real estate.
ifflce on 2d floor, over Post Office. Plattsmouth,
Nebraska. 40 I.
JOIIX IV IIAIXK
.ri'STICE OF TIIE TEACE. ana collector of
debts, collections made from one dollar to one
thousand dollars. Mortgages. Ieeds. and oth
er instruments drawn, and all county business
usually transacted before a Justice of the Peace.
Best of reference given if required.
Office on Jlaiu street. West of Court House.
40-yl JOHN W. HAINES.
I. H. WHEELER, K. D. STOME.
WHEELER & STONE,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
IMattnmouth
.Nebraska.
It It LIVIXUHTOX,
PHYSICIAN & SCBflEON, tenders his pro
fessional services to the citizens of Cass county.
Resilience southeast corner Sixth and Oak sts. ;
Office on Main street, two doors west of Sixth,
Plattsmouth. Nebraska.
IIt. J. 31. WATERJIAX,
Physio Medical Practitioner.
Isruisvillc, Caxs Co., Xth.
HPAlways at the ofnee on Saturdays. 40yl
llt. AY. II. Ht'KILIK.ECHT,
PRACTISING PHYSICIAN, will attend calls
at all hours, night or day. Plattsmouth. Ne
braska. 421y
SAUNDERS HOUSE.
J.S.GREGORY, - - - Proprietor.
Location Central. Good Sample Room..
Every attention paid to guests. 43m3
Pl.ATTSMnrTH. ----- NEC.
COrniERCIAL HOTEL,
J.TNCOLX, XEIi.,
J. J. IMIIOFF, - - - Proprietor.
The best known and most popular Landlord
iii the Male. Always slop at tile Commercial.
"GRAND CENTRAL"
HOTEL.
LARGEST AXH FINEST HOTEL BETWEEN
CHICAGO AND SAX FRANCISCO.
GEO. THRALL, - - Prop.
OMAHA. XEB.
E. PARIY1ELE,
SALE, FEED d- LI VERY ST AXLE.
On M:iin street nearly opposite the Court
Hou-e. Plattsiuouth, Nei.
HorsEsfoR Sale.
The bu :vi nnd sellin: of ood horses made
the specialty of the business.
New Horses & Carriages,
and gentle horses, for Ladies to drive ar kept
at this Stable.
Also a carry all. which runs to the depot, and
will carry piissengers from any place in town ou
call.
FARMERS CALL AXD EA'AMIXE
31 Y STOCK FOR SALE.
Syl E. I'ARMELE.
O. K. SALOON.
. I keep constantly on hand
REST MILWAUKEE BEER.
vt hich can be hail at no other
PLACE IX THE CITY.
Also the best of
ir.YFN. LIQUORS. AXD CIGARS.
PUKE APPLE P.0ILEI) CIDER.
Boiled dorm from 3 gallons to 1
FOR SALR
At Ed. Kosenbauni's by the glass or
gallon.
3.im6 Fit. Kosmlinum.
LEX II OFF & BOXXS,
3Ioniiii Dew Saloon !
One door east of the Saunders House. AVe
keep the best of
Beer, Wines, Liquors & Cigars.
33m9 CoDStantly on Hand.
CM Z. t T
DICK STREIGHT'S
LI V FRY, FEED AXD SALE STA
BLES. Corner 6th and Pearl Sts.
nOnSKS BOARDED FT THK
DAY, WEEK, OR MOXTII.
HORSES BOUGHT.
SOLD OE TEAUED.
For a Fair Commission.
TEAMS AT ALL HOI ItS.
railieular attention paid to
Driving and Training
TKOTTISC STOCK.
Ai A hearse furnished when called for.
A ireat Jtedaetlon lu l'rlee of
GUNS, REVOLVERS, &c.
Trloe roiltweil from 20 to so per cent. VHt
for IUastratsl Catalogue, with reduced prices
1 4 .1.1 .-..
GREAT WESTERN GUN WORKS,
91 Smlthfleld St.. Pittsburgh, Pa. lyl
H. A. WATERMAN & SON,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In
PINE L.UMRER,
LATH.
SIIIXGLE3.
SASIT,
DOOKS,
BLIXDS.
ETC
irrc
ETC.
Maluttreet, Corner of Fifth,
PLATTSMOUTH, .... NEB,
Still Better Rates for Lumber.
VEGETINE.
HER OWN WORDS.
Baltimore, Md., Feb. 13, 1877.
Mr. II. K. Steevess.
Dear Sir. SI uce several years I have cot a
eore and very painful foot. I had fome tHiysi
cian. but they couldn't cure me. Now I have
heard of your Vkoktixk from a lady wlio was
sick for a longtime, and became all well from
your Vfhf.ti.vk, and I went and bought one
bottle of Vf.cktink ; and after I had used one
bottle the pains left me, and it beuan to heal,
and then I bought one other bottle, and to I
take it yet. I thank God for this remedy and
yourself ; and wishing every sufferer may pay
attention to it. It is a blessing for health.
Mks. C. KitABK, CM West Baltimore St.
VEGETINE
S AFE AND SURE.
Mr. II. It. Stevens.
In 1872 your Vkgetiw k was recommended to
me, and, yielding to the persuasions of a friend
I consented to try it. At the time I was Buffer
ing from general debility and nervous prostra
tion, supe: induced by overwork and irregular
habits. Its wonderful strengthening and cura
tive properties seemed to affect my debilitated
svstem froai the first dose ; and under its per
sfsteut use I readily recovered, gaining more
than usual health and good feeling.
Since then I have not hesitated to give
Veof.tine my most unqualified indorsement,
as being a sate, sure, and powerful agent in pro
moting health and restoring the wasted system
to new life and energy. Vrcetink is the only
medicine I use ; and as long as 1 live I never
expect to find a better.
Yourn truly, W. II. CLARK,
120 Monterey Street, Alleghany, Peun.
VEGETINE
THE BEST SPRING MEDICINE.
ClIARLESTOWN.
II. II. Stevens.
Dear Sir. This is to certify that I have used
Your "Blood Preparation" in inv family for sev
eral years, and think that for Scrofula or Cank
erous Huuior or Kheumatic affections it can
not be excelled ; and as a blood purifier and
spring medicine it is the best thing I have ever
used, and I have used almost everything. I can
cheerfully recommend it to any one in need of
such a medicine.
Yours renpectfullv,
Mrs. A. A. D1NSMOKE, 19 Russell St.
VEGETINE.
WHAT IS NEEDED.
Boston, Feb. 13, 1371.
H. It. Stevens, Bsq.
Driir S!r, About one year since I fonnd my
self in a feeble condition from general debility.
VfciiKTlXK was strongly recommended to me by
a friend who hail been much benefitted by its
use. 1 procured the article, and, after using
.several bottles, was restored to health. and dis
contiuueil its use. 1 fed quite confident that
tUere is no medicine superior to it for those
complaints for which it is especially prepared,
and would cheerfully recommend it to those
who feel that t bey need noiiiethina to restore
t hem to i crl'-ct health.
Respectful iv your-, 1. L. PETTEXCILL.
Firm of S. M. Petteiigill Co.
No. 10 State St., Boston.
VEGETINE.
ALL HAVE OBTAINED RELIEF.
South Berwick, Me., Jan. 17, i72.
If. K. Stevens. F.sy.
Iirnr Sir. have had dyspepsia in its worst
form for the hist tell vears. and have taken hun
dreds of dollars' worth of medicines without oh -taiuiug
anv relief. In September last I coin
inenccil taking the Vkuetink. .since which
time mv health lias steadily improved. My
loon injresis wen. aim i nave gamcii iiueeii
pounds of I'.esh. There are several others in
this place taking Yk:etink, and all have ob
tained relief.
Your- truly. THOMAS E. MOORK,
overseer of Card Room, Portsmouth Co.'s Mills
Prepared by
II. II. STEVEXS, XSoston, Muss.
Yeptinc is Sell liy all Drniists.
ROBERT DONNELLY'S
AXD
BLACKSMITH
SHOP.
Wagon, Buggy, Macltine and Plow re
pairing, and general jobbing.
I am now prepared to do all kinds or repairing
ol farm miI other machinery. as there
is a good lathe in my shop.
PETER RAG EN,
The old Reliable Wagon Maker
has taken charge of the wagon shop.
He is well known as a
NO. 1 WORKMAN.
fw IVnsans and Hugsie made to
oruer.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
Shop on Sixth street, opposite Strcight's Stable
U.1T Mathews
HARDWARE STORE,
In Plattsmouth, Xeb., on Fourth St., about the
MIDDLE OF TIIE BLOCK,
you will And :
Corn Planters, (hand & Iiorse)
Stirring IMcmvs,
Sulky Plows,
Cultivators,
and all kinds of Farm Implements and
Shelf Hardware, Tin Ware, &c, Ac.
ALSO,
Hungarian and Millet.
Seed for Sale
3lm
PLATTSMOUTH MILLS.
FLATTSMOUTII, NEB.
C. HEISELT, - Proprietor.
Flour, Corn Meal & Feed
Always on hand and for sale at lowest cash
uriees. The hirhest uriees iaid for Wheat. ml
Corn. Particular attention given custom work.
ST11E1G1IT & MILL E It,
Harness Manufacturers,
SADDLES
BRIDLES,
COLLARS.
and all kinds of harness stock, constantly on
hand.
FRUIT, CONFECTIOXEY,
GROCERY STOKE,
NVJTS,
CANDIES,
TEAS
COFFEES,
SUGARS,
TOBACCOE3,
FLOCK,
AC.
Remember the place opposite E. G. Doyey's
on Lower Main Street.
21-ly STJiEiaXT d- MILLER.
Knlttin?.
"With a blocmlnjr mnldcn sitting.
While she nimbly plies her knitting-.
Pleased I gazed upon her beauty.
While I fill my happy duty,
"Paying out" the zephyr doub'e.
Richly paid for ploft.-unt trouble
Just to watch her nimble flmjera.
And her ruby Hps wrier. lingers
Many a beauty in her Hintling,
All my loving. soul beguiling-.
Just to feel the woiul'rous thrilling.
Of my heart with rapture filling-.
While befi1 the mnldon sitting,
"Paying out" while tiha is Knitting,
lam thinking how our knitting
Is an illustration fitting
Of the real life we're living;
Of the mercies God is giving
In the nctive world around him.
When to woman man has bound him.
Then are lo v.? and labor making
Ail the Joys our souls are taking.
His to labor ore supplying.
"Pa- ing out" life's thread, and trylruj
Ever to undo its tantrling;
His to give life's thread and hold It;
Hers In love to gently mould it
Into forms of use and beauty.
Thus they link theirlove and duty."
Faith.
GEORGE GIBSON.
There's a Joy beneath our sorrow.
As a pearl lies in the sea.
And though wnters deep roll o'er us.
There's light, though dim it be.
Tis but vain we sound the ocean.
To find no treasure tuerc
Tis but v. in afflictions smite us,
Aud we full God-iilie to bear.
There's a Joy allied to sorrow;
There's bliss conceived in ) uin;
And he who is heroic
Sheds not his tears in vain.
Epitaph Upon a Milkman.
Put awsy his short quart measure
And the cow wi h iron tail;
"MWlkl" ho yells no more at morning
He has kicked the golden paiL
PRESIDENT HAYES' MESSAGE.
THE SILVER BILL RETURNED.
The following is the president's mes
sage to the house of representatives:
After a very careful consideration
of house bill 1073, entitled "An act to
authorize coinage of a silver dollar
and to restore its legal tender charac
ter," I feel compelled to return it to
the house in which it originated with
iny objection to its passage, holding
the opinion which I expressed in my
annual message that neither interests
of the government nor tin people of
the United States would bj promoted
by disparaging silver as one of the two
precious metals which furnish the
coinage ot tlie worm, ana mat leg
islation which looks to maintaining
the volume of intrinsic money to as
full measuare of botli metals as their
relative commercial value will permit'
would be neither unjust nor inexpedi
ent. It ha" been my earnest desire to
concur with congress in adoption of
such measures to increase silver coin
age of the country as would not impair
ol ligation of contracts, either public
or private, or injuriously aJTect the
public credit. It is only on the con
viction that this bill does not meet
thse essential requirements that I
feel it my duly to withhold from ltmy
approval.
SrECIFC EFFECTS OF THE BILL.
My present official duty a to that
bill permits me only an attention to
specific objections to its passags, which
seems to me the constitution has in
such way provided. The bill provides
for coinage of silver dollars of the
weight of 4122 grains each of stand
ard silver, to be legal tender to their
nominal value for all debts and duties
public and private, except where oth
erwise expressly stipulated in the con
tract. It is well known that the mar
ket value of tLat number of grains
standard silver during the past year
has been found from ninety to ninety-
two cents as compared with the stan
dard gold dollar. Thus the silver dol
lar authorized by this bill is worth
from eight to ten per cent, less than it
purports to be worth, and is made le
gal tender for debts contracted when
the law did not recognize such coins as
lawful money, issued in sufficient
amount to circulate, put an end to the
receipt of revenue in cold, and thus
compel payment of silver for both
principal and interest of the public
debt. One billion, one hundred and
forty three million, four hundred and
ninety-three thousand four hundred
dollars of the bonded debt now out
standing was issued prior to February,
18(3, when the silver dollar was un
known in the circulation of this coun
try, and with only convenient form of
silver bullion for exportation; S5S3,
440,330 of bonded debt has been issued
since February, 1873. when gold alone
was the coin for which the bonds were
sold, and gold alono was the coin in
which both parties to the contract un
derstood that the
BONDS WOULD BE PAID.
These bonds flowed into markets of
the world. They were paid for in gold
when silver had greatly depreciated
and when no one would have bought
them if it had been understood they
would be f aid in silver. The sum of
S223 000,000 of these bonds has been
sold during my administration for
gold coin, and the United states re
ceived the benefit of those sales by
reduction of the rate of interest to 4
per cent. During the progress of those
sales a doubt was suggested as to the
coin in which payment of those bonds
would be made. The public announce
ment was thereupon authorized that
it was not to be anticipated that any
further legislation ol congress or any
action of any department of the gov
ernment would sanction or tolerate re
demption of the principal of these
bonds or the payment of interest there
on in coin exacted by the government
in exchange for the same. In view of
that fact it will be justly regarded as a
grave breach of public faith to under
take to pay these bonds, principal or
interest, in silver coin, worth in the
market less than coin received for
them. It is said the silver dollar made
a legal tender by this bill, will under
its operations.be eqiTalent in full to
the gold dollar. Many supporters of
the bill believe this, and it is just an
attempt to pay debts, either public or
private, in
COIN Or AN INFERIOR VALVE
to the money of the world. The capi
tal defect of the measure ia that it con
tains no provision protecting from its
operation pre-existing debts, in case
the coinage which it creates shall con
tinue to be of less value than that
which was the sole legal tender when
they were contracted ; if it is now pro
posed for the purpose of taking advan
tage of the depreciation of silver in
payments of debts, to coin and make
legal tender a silver dollar of less com
mercial value than the dollar, whether
of gold or paper, which is now the law
ful money of this country, such a meas
ure, it will be hardly questioned, will,
in the judgment of mankind, be an act
of bad faith as to all debts heretofore
contracted. The standard of value
should not be changed without consent
of both parties to the contract. Ra
tional promises should be kept with
unflinching fidelity. There is no pow
er to compel a nation to pay its just
debts. Its credit depends on its honor,
the nation owing what it has led its
creditors to expect. I cannot approve
a bill which, in my judgment, author
izes VIOLATION OF SACRED OBLIGATIONS.
The obligation of pulic faith tran
scends all questions of proof or public
advantage. Its unquestionable main
tainance is the dictate as well of the
highest experience as of the most
necessary duty, and should ever be
carefully guarded by the executive, by
congress, and by the people. It is my
firm conviction that if the country is
to be benefited by the silver coinage, it
can be done only by issue of silver dol
lars of full value, which will defraud
no man, and a currency worth less
than it purports to be will in the end
defraud not only creditors, but all who
are engaged in legitimate business and
no rnnrs assuredly than those who are
dependent on their daily labor for
their daily bread.
(Signed) Rutherford B. Hayes.
England's Strength.
London, Feb. 27. It is rumored in
the lobby of the House of Commons
that Lord Derby has resigned inconse
quence of importaut steps resolved on
bv the cabinet.
Major-General Sir Garnet Wolseley
contributed to the Nineteenth Century
an article entitled " England as a Mili
tary Power." The following are his
conclusions: At no previous period
has England been so strong in
MiLITART SENSE
as now. Were war declared to-morrow
about four-hundred thousand
drilled men would fall into line if re
quired, supported by 372 field guns
manned and horsed by royal artillery.
That number would roughly be made
up as follows: Standing arm' at home
9'J.OOO, army and militia reserve 4,000,
militia 83,000, volunteers 180,000. and
second class army reserve 18,000; to
tal 414.000. In this calculation I have
FIGURED VERY LOW.
having left out altogether 10,000 yeo
manry, who would be available for
home service. I have not taken into
consideration the number of regular
troops that would be available for
war when the Mediterranean garrisons
were furnished by the militia. It
will thus be seen that we could at once
TAKE THE FIELD
with two fully equipped army corps
of more than thirty thousand soldiers
each, leaving a similar force of regular
troops at home as a reserve. When I
compare the military strength of Eng
land now with what it was in 1834, I
am amazed at the condition of the mil
itary, the weakness and helplessness
which we were in when we began the
Russian war of that year.
Editor MacMurphy is in for "pay in
advance subscribers." We second the
motion. liurtonian.
W. A. Connell was in town last Sat
urda and made an effort to start a
paper in the void made by the Times.
We hope he may succeed and be com
pany for the Globe. Sutton Times.
Can't you come here, Connell, we
want just one more paper, and you're
the kind of fellow to run fourth pa
pers or four papers in one county.
Leasing- Public Lands by Government.
David City, Feb. 24.
Your correspondent at North Platte,
"Ranchero," gives some of the reasons
why the government lands should not
be rented to stock men. Additional
reasons of great importance might be
given. It is well known that the re
gion of country in question is a thor
oughfare, not only for bringing stock
to the railroad for shipment, but for
immigrants who cross those plains ev
ery summer, with both teams and herds
of cattle, horses and sheep, which
amounts to a large percentage of the
occupancy of the country. If the
lands were leased to stock men, with
the privilege reserved for the public to
cross with their stock.it would effectu
ally defeat the object of the lessee, for
it is plain to see that any herdsman
could pasture his stock on such leased
lands continuously, by keeping on the
move and not making a permanent
camp.
Your correspondent says, "It may be
urged that the government ouht to
receive some income for the use of
these lands." If that is really a true
politic principle, it appears to me that
the object can be secured in a much
better way; that i3 to say by a direct
tax per head for all stock kept on gov
ernment lands in the grazing regions.
A law of Congress authorizing such a
tax should stipulate the boundaries of
such regions, foi the purpose of deter
mining what stock should be so taxed,
but not to the hurt of agricultural pur
suits, leaving States and Territories in
terested, free to mako their own law
with regard to the trespass of stock up
on agricultural lands. For, it is evi
dent, that if no impediment is thrown
in the way, agriculture and grazing
jointly will be carried on in large por
tions of territory that are now little
occupied with either and it is import
ant to the government that it should
be so. It will enlarge the bounds of
industry, arrd make homesteads of much
of the lands in question.
A tax per head upon all cattle ship
pe 1, which had been kept on such lands
a definite length of time fixed br law.
could be easily levied and collected by
the revenue collector of the district
where the stock had been located, tak
ing the R. K, Co's. shipping books for
tneaata. Occident.
TELEGRAPHIC!
The Silver Bill Passes the Honse and
Senate.
London, Feb. 28. A Vienna corre
spondent states the Russian concessions
touching limits and length of occupa
tion of Bulgaria are quite sufficient,
with the present tendency of the Aus
trian government, to restore confidence.
Austria is content for the moment and
looks to the conference for the rest.
Still another telegraphs: The posi
tion appears extremely critical, not
withstanding tranquilizing utterances
of ministerial papers. The conference
i3 regarded in Austrian government
circles as ad journed sine die.
London, Feb. 28. In the house of
commons to-night Sir Stafford North
cote, replying to a question, stated the
government was still uninformed of
final terms of peace, but if they injuri
ously affected British interests the gov
ernment will take the proper course to
vindicate and protect those interests.
This declaration wa3 received with
loud cheers,
Deadwood, Feb. 28. A monster
mass meeting was held at Miner's Union
hall in Lead City to-night in favor of
Lincoln territory bill now in congress.
A procession headed by a band of mu
sic and a wagon carrying speakers, flags,
banners and emblems, made the grand
rounds through Deadwood, Central City
Gayville, Golden Gate and Lead City.
The names of Saunders, Spencer and
other members of congress who cham
pion the new territory bill were receiv
ed with hearty applause.
THE SILVER BILL IN THE 6ENATE.
At 4 o'clock the senate pioceeded to
vote on passage of the silver bill, not
withstanding the objections of the
president, and it was passed by a two
thirds vote yeas 40, nays 19.
THE SILVER BILL IN TIIE HOUSE.
The vote in the house on passage of
the silver bill, notwithstanding the ve
to, was 196 to 73. The announcement
was greeted with general applause.
Condition of Hon. Ben Wade.
Cincinnati, March 1. A Herald
special from Jefferson, Ohio, this
morning, says Mr. Wade is we iker.
Rome, March 1. The Italian gov
ernment warned the Vatican authori
ties through the inspector of polico
that they could take no measures to
prevent possible disturbance at the
pope's coronation, as the pope did not
recognize the king of Italy. The Vati
can is indignant, and it has been deci
ded that coronation shall be strictly
private. An understanding between
the papac yand Italy as far off as ever.
London, March 1. In the house of
Lords this afternoon Derby, in reply
to inquiry of Lord Granville, s;iid he
had reason to believe the treaty of
peace would be signed to-morrow.
Derby said a rumor had reached him
from many qnarters, which he hoped
was true, that Russia had abandoned
her idea of cession to her of the Turk
ish fleet.
(Jiiiek Conversion.
A hard old customer was Badger.
He was never known to attend church
and was considered the wickedest man
in the small town in which he lived.
One night his old cow was prowling
about the house seeking what she might
devour, and stuck her head in the
swill barrel. By the time the barrel
was empty, her head was so far in that
she made a blind rush to free herself
from the incumberance. As luck
would have it, she struck a bee line for
the house, and directly for the front
door. The o'd man was sitting inside
telling his family all about a great
murder trial, when the cow gave a
frightful bellow, which was prolonged
by the empty barrel into an unearthly
roar. At the same time, the front door
crashed from its hinges, and the cow,
with her uncommon headgear, bolted
into the room. '"Old wickedness" gave
one agonized look at the frightful de
mon which confronted him; each sep
arate and individual hair stood on end;
a shivering feeling crawling up and
down his back; his eyes protruded from
his head; altogether, he was a picture
of abject terror. Suddenly his tongue
was loosened, and he screamed, "For
heaven's sake take Mary! She's better
prepared than I am." Since that
eventful night the man has joined an
easy-going church, which is one step
progressive, and he only swears when
he sees old Bi indie or the swill-barrel.
The old cow "fetched him."
Labor-Saving Machinery.
The London Engineer tells a strange
story of the prejudices of English work
men against labor-saving machinery.
It says that there are many manufac
turers who have the machinery but
cannot use it, and this machinery re
mains unproductive and unused, not
because of defects or for want of knowl
edge of how to make it work, but be
cause of the opposition of the workers
themselves to its use. One of the man
ufacturers referred to by the Engineer
has idle machinery worth $15,000, and
another machinery worth $-50,000,
which they are afraid to operate for
fear their manufactories should be
burned down by hostile workmen. Half
a century ago such sentiments as give
rise to the hostility against labor-saving
machinery were quite common, but
the great majority of working-men in
this country at least have learned that
the inventor is not their enemy, and
hat notwithstanding all his ingenuity
and inventions, he cannot yet keep pace
with the growing demands of civilized
communities. "Necessity is the moth
er of invention," and inventions born
of anything else lead but languishing
lives. Labor-saving machinery, if it
meets a real necessity, multiplies the
demands of men, and opens up new in
dustries; if it does not meet a necessity
it will not be used and in either event
it is not an enemy to the working
Difficult Lore Making:.
The boy who sells fruit and confec
tionary on the train is usually a very
vigorous sort of boy, with an eye strict
ly to business, and with no romantic
thoughts running through his active
brain. One of them came very near ru
ining the happiness of two young souls
for life, the other day.
A young man sat in the seat with a
pretty girl, and though the passengers
couldn't distinguish their conversation,
from the noise made by the cars, it was
pretty evident that what was being s;tid
was of great interest to the young cou
ple. He was saying: "Jennie, darling, I
have long been wishing an opportunity
to tell you of my great regard for"
"Peanuts?" inquired the fruit and
confectionary boy, thrusting his basket
in front of the pair.
"No!" exclaimed the young man in an
annoyed tone, and waving his hand t)
one side.
"As I was saying, Jennie," he contin
ued, when the boy had passed on, "I
have long wanted to tell you of my re
gard for you. You are everything to
me, and always in my absence my
thoughts are constantly dwelling
upon"
"Nice candy prize in every box,"
interrupted the boy, totally ignorant of
the interesting conversation he was in
juring, ine young man shook his
head, while the girl looked mad enough
to bite a hairpin in two. When the boy
had left the young man resumed:
"I do not think you are entirely in
sensible to my regard, and I feel certain
that you in some degree reciprocate.
Tell me, darling, if I have a right to
think that you are fond of"
"Nice fresh fig3 ten cents a" the
boy saw by the countenance of the pair
that he could make no sale, and moved
ahead with the basket. The young man
Gnished-with his eyes the sentence he
had commenced, and waited for an an
swer. It came, murmured i:i his ear,
that no other person might learn its
import:
"Oh, Charlie, you've no idea how
happy you make me by your avowal.
You know that I care for you only, and
that my regard for you is as lasting
as"
"Maple candy very nice" said the
boy, displaying a tempting array of the
delicacy.
"Clear out!" ejaculated the young
man, between his teeth, in a savage tone,
and as the boy cleared out, he turned to
his sweetheart for the continuation of
ner answer.
"As lasting as eternity. I have al
ways cared more for you than anybody
else. All our folks think" you are just
splendid, and mother says you are as
good as"
"Pop com fresh this morning."
The young man rose hastily and lifted
the boy several seats down the aisle, and
the girl fell to crying in her handker
chief. The young man resumed his
seat, and sat in a moody silence until
the train stopped at his station, when,
in company with the young lady, he
alighted, while the boy, after nursing
the spot where he was kicked for a few
minutes, went on with his business, in
utter ignorance of the fact that he had
perhaps broken up a most interesting
and happy courtship. Rockland Cou
rier. Dinner-Table Hints.
When taking a lady down do not ask
if she is "peckish" or "sharp-set."
Do not say "I hope they will give us
a good tuck-out!"
When you are seated keep calm, what
ever there is for dinner.
Soup should not le chewed, you must
swallow it whole.
Never hammer with your feet for the
next course, or shout "waiter!"
When anything nice is put on the
table do not chuckle nor rub your chest.
When the entrees come round, make
a free choice, but don't pocket.
Never take more than four helps of
anything.
Do not sponge your gravy with your
bread and squeeze it down your throat;
it has an uneducated look.
Never speak with your mouth full;
first, because its vulgar; and, secondly,
because you car 't.
If you feel uncomfortable symptoms
arising from repletion you must dissem
ble; do not call lor brandy and pepper
mint dropa
If yonr air neighbor asks what is the
matter with you, hasten to assure her
that it's not catching.
Crack nuts for your hostess if yonr
teeth are good.
Do not say "I'm chock full!" when
dinner is over; it has a foreign air about
it.
Before joining the ladies wash yonr
hands in the bowls provided for the
purpose; you should not call for soap or
bath towels. Puncli.
Fighting on Tea.
The Russian soldiers are said to live
and fight almost wholly upon tea. The
Cossacks often carry it along in the
shape of bricks, or rather tiles, which,
before hardening, are soaked in sheep's
blood and boiled in milk, with the ad
dition of flour, butter and salt, so as to
constitute a kind of soup. The passion
of the Russian for this beverage is
simply astonishing. In the depth of
winter he will empty twenty cups in
succession, at nearly boiling point,
until he perspires at every pore, and
then in a state of intense excitement,
rush out, roll in the snow, get up, and
go on to the next similar place of en
tertainment. So with the army. With
every group or circle of tents travels
the invariable tea-cauldron, suspended
from a tripod; and it would be vain to
think of computing how many times
each soldier's pannikin is filled upon a
halt. It is his first idea. Frequently
be carries It cold in a copper case, as a
go!&C9 upon the rtiarch.
FOR THE HOUSEHOLD.
An old negro cook says, "Sass am
powerful good in elery ting but chil'n.
Dey needs some odor kind ob dressin."
A good furniture polish Is composed
of equal parts of boiled linseed oil and
kerosene oil well shaken together. Ap
ply with a pie -e of soft flannel, and pol
ish with a dry piece of flannel.
Apples.
With us the use of tne apple, as an ar
ticle of foo'l, is far underrated. Besides
containing a large amount of sugar, mu
cilage and other nutritive matter, ap
ples contain vegetable acids, aromatic
qualities, etc., which act powerfully in
tlie capacity of refrigerants, tonics, and
antiseptics, and when freely used at
the season of mellow ripeness they pre
vent debility, indigestion, and avert,
without doubt, many of the "ills that
flesh is heir to." The operatives of
Cornwall, England, consider ripe ap
ples nearly as nourishing as bread, and
far more so than potatoes. Iu the year
1801 which was a yearof much scarcity
apples, instead of being converted into
cider, were sold to the poor, and the la
borers asserted that they could "stand
their work" on baked apples without
meat; whereas a potato diet required
either meat or some other substantial
nutriment. The French and Germans
use apples extensively: so do the inhab
itants of all European nations. The
laborers depend upon them as an article
of food, and frequently make a dinner
of sliced apples and bread. There is
no fruit cooked in as many different
ways in our country as apples, nor is
there any fruit whose value, as an arti
cle of nutriment is as great and so little?
appreciated. Water-Cnre Journal.
America n Weincn.
American women take vastly better
care of themselves than formerly.
They have more aeqtta iitanco with hy
gienic laws, and hold them in far high
er esteem. The days when they ex
posed themselves to dampness and
wintry cold, in thin slippers and silk
stockings; when they abstained from
flannels next to tho skin; when they
pinched their waists to semi-suffocation;
when they sacrificed comfort and
health to what they conceived to bo
their appearance these foolish and
unhappy days have gone forever, have
barely been known to tlie rising gen
eration. Our women now have nr
mawkish and morbid notions as to
themselves; they no longer think that
to be unhealthy is to be attractive;
that invalidism and iuterestingness are
synonymous; that pale faces and com
pressed lungs are tokens of beauty.
They dress seasonably; they wear thick
boots and warm clothes in bad and
cold weather; they allow themselves to
breathe freely, and they find their looks
improved, not injure I, by the whole
some change. There are exceptions
many of them doubtless but the rule
is as we have described, and tho excep
tions are constantly diminishing. It
may be safely siid that all sensible
women are becoming, if they have
not yet become, converts to nature, and
that they heed her behests, recogniz
ing the great principle that what is not
natural cannot be beautiful. Harper's
Bazar.
Drying Flowers In Sand.
The Ladies' Floral Cabinet recom
mends the preservation of flowers in
sand, and gives the following plan of
carrying out the advice: "Take deep
dishes or those of sufficient depth to al
low flowers to be covered an inch deep
with sand. Get the common white sand,
such as is used for scouring purposes,
cover the bottom of the dish with a layer
about half an inch deep, and then lay
on the flowers with the stems down
ward, holding them firmly in place
while you sprinkle more sand over
them, until all the places between the
petals are filled and the flowers out o
sight. A broad dish will accommodate
quite a large number. Allow sufficient
sand between; set tho disli in a dry.
warm place, where they will dry grad
ually, and at the end of a week pour off
the sand and examine them. If there
is any moisture in the sand it must be
dried out before using again, or fresh
sand may be poured over them. Some
flowers will require weeks to dry, while
others will become sufficiently dry in a
week or ten days. By this simple pro
cess flowers, ferns, etc., are preserved
in the proper shape, as well as in their
natural color, which is far letter than
topressthem in books." While flow
ers will not answer well for thi3 pur
pose, nor any succulent plants as the
hyacinth or cactus. Such flowers as
dahlias, pansies, carnations, pinks,
sweet Williams and gladiolus may be
preserved for years.
In Berlin there are about one hun
dred females employed in the telegraph
office, and among them are to be found
women of good standing in society.
Those who enter are trained in the
necessary theoretical and practical
knowledge in a special school, estab
lished by the Post Office authorities.
The preliminary examination is higher
in its requirments than in England,
comprising English, French, Geogra
phy, and the construction of German
sentences. A three months' course is
required in the practicing rooms,
where the management of the appara
tus is taught, and a practical examina
tion is then passed. Lectures on
physics and chemistry are then attend
ed twice a week for five months, after
which an appointment is given. Then
another written and verbal examination
must be passed on the internal man
agement of the telegraph service, and
the uses of the various portions of tho
apparatus. When a'l these trials have
been successfully passed the candidate
receives a permanent appointment.
The service is in great demand, and
the work of tne ladies ia said to be
highly satisfactory.
A