Nebraska herald. (Plattsmouth, N.T. [Neb.]) 1865-1882, December 06, 1877, Image 1

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    THE HERALD.
3MA
MRA
B
rirnusriKD very Thursday
AOYKKTIMIXiU IUTHH.
AT
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA
ill'
si'Ack. 1 w.l 2 w.i 3 ir. 1 iii. 3 ni.
t m.
l yr.
1 sjr...;$i no.
2 irs.
1 50!
irt-ll 2 75,' 3 25 10'
. OFFICE:
On Vin St., On Block Morth of Matin,
. - ' Corner of Fifth Street
rAfKHH CABS COl.TV.
3 sqr-t .
h col..
'i 1..
S0O
(Ml
2 7.. 4 00 4 "S! h.l 13 i
R I0J llNI; t'-'flO 2flii)l 2Sm
v ' 'V
I " (HI
m on
His iSOO1 40 CU
1 ll . . . IS HI III)
'." oil 4 mi tio (
JNO. A. MACMURPHY, Editor.)
F E IIS EV E It A X C E CONQUERS.
TERMS : $2.00 a Year.
l-ty-AH Advertising bl!N due quarterly.
fipJTrnnsicnt .HjT;rtl.-.f.inritH must )t paid
lor in advance.
Term, in Advance:
rnxv, m' yenr ..$2.no
One copy, six lumiths 1.00
One oopv. three mouths M
VOLUME XIII. !
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY, DECEMBEK 6, 1377.
1 NUMBER 37.
hxtra c. pie of the IUrai i lor sale hy J. V.
loung. Poitoirti-e news drix.t. :iiu1 ). F. Joun
son.conier of Main and Fifth Streets.
THE HE KALI).
SKA
$12 w
ifl ey
14 (
60 00
in. t o
FI BST
National Bank
PLATTSMOUTH. NEBRASKA,
ll CtsSSOH TO
T viTI.!, MAXSA A tlABK
oHV KT.:KRALT..
K. i. l 1VKV,
W. MrUucinUJI.
lil.VII O'lUlDRIK
, President.
Vice President.
Cashier.
.Assistant Cashier.
T.iW B.tnk 1 now open lor ttiinss at their
e .. rooi i. corner Main and Sixth streets, and
is prepared to trasifict a treiieral
BANKING BUSINESS.
Slock. B?d,
Q-l-J. 3sarment mm4 Lol
Seruritiss
BOUGHT AND SOLD.
DrpoviU litceirid mid Interest Allow- j
ed on Tim Certificates.
DBA.PT3 JZH"W3Sr,
wall .bis in nriT part of the United Strifes and
lu all tlw Principal Towua Mia cu:es
of F-ojope.
IGFA'TS FOR. TIIK
CFLEHRATED
UirUK Line and Allan Line
OP KTKinEKH.
Pr.-vm wib;ug to b:tug out their fnwnils from
.up;e can
X h r s h
t m Piattimtk.
o
O
-
o
o
o
o
o
w
O
rH
5J
ft
S5
8
m I r k
S 5
to
- o
x ;
525
c:
a
2q
5
o
o
p
ExcL-isior' Barber Shop.
jt a BOONE,
'; . ., !ifr-t. opf.itsit': & nnde.ru House.
.f AIR-CUTTING,
;.;.ns anil Slia;niMMilng.
' Si.CI VL T1ESTIW GIVEN TO
i.ti :tzt IifMn'iul lr:ltlIe
ilnlr.
see boonk, gents.
Vi t. ,:t & lior.ne i a
-Lrcl.MT SIIAV3S.
an. SQTeville,
VT.OTHl7.ICll Of
rALACE BILLIARD HALL.
. . ........ I
LirTsnfirTii. - - - m:
MV RAW If HUPr-LlI.D WITH THE
BST WINES, LIQUORS,
B E E H , ETC.
ETC .
Oyl
r o i
. o u v
XexoMnc Shops!
JOHir WAYHAM",
PtTT"TOCTII. NEB..
LVjtftircr of Steam Engines, Boiler.
Xain and Grist ftlillf
.-.. A AXIS KTF.AH FITTl i?4.
'r,.ik-;i'. Iror. rios. Force nnd Lift Pijies.Sream
;".- s-fff- alve overnors. ana an
t::.l"f Pta Eiigliie Fittings.
:fA'.rel ou short notiee.
f A : M MACHINEMt
T'p .".;e x i.Q S'Tarf Kovice.
4yl
' Y O UNG!
55
4
ll G
n
t n-.tv'tyn 6e found at Half Old
. 7, ready to $tll the best Meats.
CsO iitv freh ft cattle, sheep, boirs c.
t ;'n.ui the farmers every day, and his
:.ts tii .n :y JT'XKl.
t Ht.:, run. a.d foitl, j.v season
3vl..
BROTHERS,
Dealers in
KTC
KTC, ETC-
cf he Pot-Offlce, riatUmouth,
roradka.
l"Tetlcal Workers in
sHFtT IhON, ZISC, TIN,
BRA-
l-ne s:rtnient of Hard ana Soft
COAL. ' STOVES,
v.'crd and Coal Stoves for
HEATING Oil COOKING.
AIwets on Hand.
ry vitrift' "f Tin. Sheet Iron.
'Work, kept in Stock.
and Zinc
MAKING AND REPAIRING,
Ii tie on Short Notice.
larrvEnrTHTsa irAimAyTEDnun
rcicr-H ww uowx.
SAGE BROS.
GO rO THE
Herald Office
FOR YOUR
HORE.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
CHAPM . Jk SPKA4.17K.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
And Solicitors In Chancery. Office in Fitzger
ald Block,
It. H. n'HKFXI'R eV CO. -
Mwnrpiri Col Pliil fir nl lif.r.
surance Agents, I'lattunoutb, Nebraska. Col
lectors, tax-payers. Have a complete abstract
of titles. Buy and sell real estate, negotiate
loaus. &c. . 15yl
n. I. LYXCIf,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
Office in Fitzgerald Block. Plattamouth, Neb.
JA1IF.H K. SIORRIHOX.
ATTORN EY AT LAW. Will oractice In Cass
and adjoining CounMes ; plves special attention
to collection! and abstracts of title. Office with
Geo. S. fcinlth, Fitzgerald Block. FUUUmoutu,
Nebraska.
EO. 14. MMITH.
ATTORNEY AT LAW and Real Estate Bro
ker. Special attention nlven to Collections
and all matters affecting the title to real estate.
Office on 2d floor, over Post Offlae. Plattsnioutb,
Nebraska. 40 i.
JOII. IV II4IXF8
JUSTICE OF TIIE PEACE, anu collector o!
debts, collections made from one dollar to one
thousand do lars. Mortgages. Deeds, and oth
er instruments drawn, and all connty business
usuallv transacted Itefore a Justice of the Peace.
luii f reference eiven If reauired.
Oftlce on Maiu street. West of Court IJonse.
40-yl jdii.x n.nAi.iu.
D. B. WHKKBR. K. D. STOXK.
WHEI LER & TONE,
ATTORNEYS AT LA W,
PlattMBieatli XeferasU.
B K LIVIXU8TOX.
PHYSICIAN & SCRGEON. tenders bis pro
fessional services to the citizens of Cass county.
Kesidence southeast corner (Sixth ana iihk sis.
Otliceon Main street, two doors west of Sixth.
Plattsnioutb. Nebraska.
OR.fi. II. BLACK
attends to calls la the country as well as city.
Office. -it J. H. Butterv's drug store. Chronic dis
ease made a tueclalty. Rheumatism cured.
DR. J. 91. WATKItMAS,
Physio Medical Practitioner.
Ixruisritle. Can Co.. AZ.
IF Always at the office on Saturdays.
40yl
O. K. SALOON.
I keep constantly on hand
Best's .Milwaukee Brer.
which can be had at no other
PLACE IN THE CITY.
Also the bes; of
WIXES, LIQUUItS, A.XD CIGARS.
.im Ed. Kssfnbsam.
LEXII0FF L- B0XX8,
Morning Dew S;loon !
One door east of the Saunders Ilouse. We
keep the best of
Beer, Wines, Liquors & Cigars,
33m9 Constantly on Hand
AGENTS! "150
low-prici. nd r ist-nkllim;
I .,.!
ARE MOST COM r LET ELY REPItESENTEOIXOUR
iR'l 0'imATIOV PR H.
I-::TS'H h sample pases, bindings. Illustm-
tion, etc. They are iMijiular w rks of every
kind, ami ure Hirers I
i roi u
"anvaKers.
All act-
ually wUhins emrUument. and nonther. addre-s
oiii . kiiiuvi i jirn ut ini f. m.
E. PARMELE,
SALE, FEED ct- LIVERY STABLE.
On Main street nearly onoosite tha Court
House. Plattsmouth, .Neb.
BorsEsfoR Sale.
The buvlni; and selllnz of cood horses made
ine specialty ot tne Du-siuess.
iMew Horses & Carriages
and gentle horses, for Ladies to drive ars kept
at this Stable.
Also a carry all. which runs to the depot, and
will carry nassenuers from any Dlace iu town on
can.
FARUERS CALL AND EXAMINE
MY STOCK FOR SALE.
8yl E. l'ARMELE.
DICK STREIGBT'S
LIYEBY,
Feed and Sale Stables
Corner 6th and Pearl Sts.
BORSsS BOAKDK0 BT THE
DAY, YTECK, Oil IOTII
HORSES BOUGHT.
SOLD Oil TRADED,
For a Fair Commission.
TEAMS AT ALL HOURS.
Pai.icular attention paid to
Driving and Training
TUOTTIXC STOCK.
Alss) A hearse furnished when called foi.
INVENTIONS & PATEHTS.
o
T. C. ITOODITtRD.
Attorney an! Counsellor at Law,
1003 8tb St.. N. W..(F. O. Lock Box 171),
Washington. D. C.
Late Examlner-in-Chiet I'nUed States Patent
voice: iMenueroi tne Mar ."Supreme
Court of the I'nited Stales.
Patent Law Practice in the Patent Of-
jlce ana tne courts a Specialty.
PATfcXTS ObTAKMI IX THE CitlTFD STATES.
CANADA. tBI.AM. r KANOF. IFRMA'Y,
KvsfiA, Belgium. Italt. ac.
Hwrrnrscra .Hon. W. B. Allison, r S. Sen
ator: i;ot. S. J. Klrkwood. V. S. Sei ator;
Judse m. iximihndpe. fcx-M. C: .lustiee
Sam'l Miller. lT. S. Supreme Vurt : Ho . .las.
iianau. r.x-secreiary interior. Jiistn-e- J. e.
IMIlon. I' . Circuit Court : Jnd-e K. I.. R
Clarke. Chairman Apresl Board, Patent Office ;
vm. a. m. van. nun. Kallwav Mall Service:
C?en. J. M. Hedrick, Ex-Snn'r. Inter. Ifev. ;
Jndge E. 8. Sampson. C.C. : Hon. fieo. W. Mc-
(.4-orr. Heeretarv ot War: CL L n. Inrsrsnll
- nico rosv. mnsoc
Good fresh milk
D ELIV EKED DAILY !
AT
EVERFBODT'S HUMEIX PLATTSMOUTH
tr THK WA!IT IT. BT
J. F. mtil MKlSTLR.
fESD IJf TOCK ORDRRK AND I WILL TBI AJTD
(iirs reo
jPTTtRli" tMZIXjIK:
407I d serve yo reioiflv
VEGETINE
WILL CURE RHEUMATISM.
MR. ALBERT CROOK EK, the well-known
druggist and apothecary, of Springvale, Me. al
ways advises every one troubled with BUeuma
turn to iry VKUKTIN K.
Read Ills Statement:
SrsiNQVALK, He., Oct. 12. 1(76.
Mr. II. R. St k yews :
Dear Sir, Fifteen years ago last fall I was ta
ken sick with the rheumatism, was unable to
move until the next April. From that time un
til three years ago this fall I suffered everything
witn rneamaiisiu. sometime mere wouia oe
weeks at a time that I could not step one step ;
these attacks were Quite often. I suffered ev
erything that a man could. Over three years
ago last spring I commenced taking TKomRX
and followed it up until I had taken seven bot
tles ; nave nad uo rheumatism since mat time.
I always advise everyone that is troubled with
rheumatism to trv vkobtinr, and not suffer
forvearsaslhavedone. This statement is era-
tuitous as far as Mr. Stevens is coucerned.
sours, v&v..
ALBERT CROOKER,
Firm of A. Crooker tt Co., Druggists and Apotb
ecaries.
VEGETINE
HAS ENTIRELY CURED ME.
Bobtojt, Oct., 1870.
Mb. H. R. Strvkns :
Dear Sir. My daughter, after having a severe
atta k of Whoopiug Cough, was left in a feeble
state of health. Being advised by a friend she
tried the Vkoktink, and after using a few bot
tles was fully restored to health.
1 have been a treat sufferer from Rheuma
tism. 1 have taken several bottles of the Vkg
ari!E for this complaint, and am happy to say
it bas entirely cured me. 1 Lave recommended
tli Vkoktimr to others with the same good re
sults. It is a great cleanser and purifier of the
blood ; it is pleasant to take audi cau cheerful
ly recommend it.
JAMES MORSE. 361 Athens street.
The blood in this disease, is found to contain
an excess of Abrin. VEUETiKEacts by convert
ing the blood from its diseased condition to a
neai thy circulation, vkoktine rseuiates tne
bowels which Is very liupottaiit in this com
plaint. One bottle of Vkuktime will give relief,
nut to effect a permanent cut e it must be takeu
remilar'v. and may t ike several bottles, especi
ally in cases of long standing. Vegetink is
so.d by all druggists. Try it. and your verdict
wtu be me same as in:t oi tiiousanas ueiore
?ou, who say, "I never lound so mucu relief as
rom the use of Veoetime." which is composed
exclusively of DarH, RtoU aud Herb.
"Vimjetink." says a Boston physician, "had
no equal as a bloou puriner. iteaxiugoi its mans
wonderful cures, after all other remedies lia
tilled I v. sited the lai orutory an J convinced my
self of Its genuine merit, it is prepared from
barks, roots and herbs, each of which is highly
effective, and they are compounded in such a
mauneras to produce astonishing results."
VEGETINE.
NOTHING EQUAL. TO IT.
South Salesc. Mass., Not. 14, 1876.
Mb. n R. Strvems :
Dear Sir. I have been troub!ed with Scrofu
la. Cai.ker and Liver Complaint for three years ;
nothing ever did mc any good until 1 commenc
ed using the Vkoetink. I am uow getting
along firtit-rate. and still using the Veoktime.
cousiuer taere Is uodiiag eou.il to it lur sucn
' O.npiaiuts. Can heartily recommend it to ev
erybody. Yours truly.
MK!i. M rAllVA lil
No. 16 Lagrange stieet. South Salem, Mass.
VEG&TIN
Prepared by
91. K. STEVL.VS, Roston, Mhm.
Veptine is Sold by all Drnzfists.
PLATTSM0UTH MILLS.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEB.
G. HEISEL, - Proprietor.
. TT , .
Flour, Corn Mjal, & Food
Always on hand and for sale at lowest cash I
prices. The hiehest prices paid for Wneat at..l
Corn. Particular attention given custom wurk.
SAUNDERS HOUSE.
S. GREGORY, - - - Proprietor.
Location Central. Good Sample Room..
Every attention paid to guests. A5iu3
LATTSMOUTH, ----- NEB.
C03I3IERCIAL HOTEL,
LINCOLN, NEB.,
.T.J. IMIIOFF, - - - Proprietor.
The best known and most popular Landlord
in the State. Always stop at the Commercial.
VI tt All Li luEslll itrljL
HOTEL,
larKfst and finest Hotel be
twecu Chicago and San
Francisco.
GEO. THRALL, - - . Prop.
OMAHA. NEIJ.
A CIreat ltedurtlou In Prices of
GUNS, REVOLVERS, &c.
Prices reduced from 20 to 30 ner cent
Write
for Illustrated Catalogue, with reduced
for 1877. Address.
prices
GREAT WESTERN GUN WORKS,
91 Snilthfleld St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 181
3. A. WATERMAN & SON,
Wholesale and Betail Dealers in
Pine Lumber,
ibiLTjEi:,
Sash,
Doors,
Blinds,
ETC.. ETC.. ETC. '
Mau street Corner of Fifth.
FLATTSMOUTH, - - - - NEB.
I :
Still Better Rates for Lumber.
STRE1GIIT & MILLER.
Harness Manufacturers,
BKIDLES.
coo. Arts.
and all kluds of harness stock, constantly oa
hand.
Fruit, Confectionery,
AND
Grocry Store
NUTS,
COFFEES.
SUGAKS,
FLOCK,
e.
Kemember the place otwoVte K. G.
Dovey's
on Ixvrer Matn Street.
21-ly &XR3IQUT d MILLER.
To the firovrers of Nebraska.
Your attention is called to the poli
cy of organizing a State Woo! Grower's
Association.
The many reasons which nrge tle
formation of such an Association can
be hut briefly set forth in circular
like this. And first,
It is a well established axiom of bu
siness.that in numbers there isstrength
a three fold cord, says the wise man,
is not easily broken. Therefore, let us
increase our strength at once by imme
diate organiz.it io :. Organization will
bring to us Hot only strength but uni
ty; it will make us acquainted with
I ... n. .;.i, ,H.
I v't " .inii
j er3 mode and inet ho.1 of handling sheep
and woo!; k will educate ustothebest
breeds of sheep for our surroundings.
and in the true principles of breeding.
the breedi tie for a purpose. I: will
educate us how to grow, handle and
market wool, to the best advantage,
Bv organization, we shall eta lish a
school in which each member will be
both teacher and pupil.
Thai Nebraska is a natural sheep
country is patent to every well inform'
ed observer. Wool growing is as an
cient as civilization. It has been honor
ed in all countries.
It is a necessity m m must be cloth
ed and no clothing is as healthful and
cheap as that tiwl of wool. Wool
clothes alike thn King and the Peas int ;
the Maid, the Ma rou and ihe Queen.
It takes sir pounds of wool to clothe
the average person. The present pop
ulation of these UnLed States requires
240,039,000 pounds of wo annually to
clothe them. Aud our to.al production
is less than '03,000,030 pounds. There
fore, we are compelled and do import
more than 40,00,000 pounds of woo!
annually to clothe ourselves. And for
these 40,000.000 p. muds of foreign wool
we pay gold. With the best climate,
water, soil and vegetation of the world,
for wool growing, shall we longer con
tinue in this ruinout pracuc?? M.in-
hood. self-res jct, an 1 our country s
honor foi bids.
American wmla ar? stronger, softer,
work more kindly, than .h" woois of
other countries, and are sought after by
all manufacturers.
American m mufaeturers prefer our
doiues ic wools to foreign. In fact eer-
taiu sUIes and qualities of goods cum
be made only from A n rica.'i wool
European m inufactur -r :t"k no wledg
this hey acknowledged it at the On-
tennia': and were astonished at th
body, lustra, linish, q.i .lit? and cheai)
ness of American cloths.
American wools. American genius,
and A.neric in machinorv have chai-
eed the ost of ciotiihi- to th? p.-.?it?
one i, df in f ir.y j'ears. PloleCtijn to
Horn- Industry wLI render our coun-
try self-susainin in her every depart-
mtnt
: i . i; i .
.vi cni,iii rT" "e i:oess
t,lHV ,.r . i...... i ,.!, th . uro In
a surplus they cannot buy of o.hvrs
Excli myes are never made on the b isis
of something for nothing, but for a
consideration.
Eoiope. while increasing in popul i
tion. is ilecreasinjf in wool-roducii n
she has re.iclied and passed her max
imum hence f or Ji she must impirt
more large;y of tlie raw :n iteri al. or
her manufactures uiut dex.line a so.
Free Trade lias :i-.ti'ly aanilul itv'.l
the merino n-ks of Oeruia..y, and
ruined her woolen m.t: ufaciuies.
t7...-i i i. . i. i
dred inhabi ants, an i she can kefp n
more. France has U7. P. os.si t 93, while
ihe who e Russian Empire has 81, aud
a grand total of 6 .3i7,(K)0.
The Argentine Republic has 51,530,
260 sheep, producing 216,000,000 pounds
Of wool.
Australia had in 1374, 61.634.12:
shei p, which has been .he chief instru
ment of her civilization.
The wool p.l;ict o.' California f r
the current ear is tst ;m ed a; ii J.Oj V
000 pi an ls. ltsi yetr i: n aen.
1 5 1,- !
000.000 iioiiii is.
;
is I
The domestic production o:
lii-Mil v tiroiuoii v o: inn ino t.-i-i in.i
abundance of the woo. iu la ila. t ui ; s
; ot a u t ion.
The wool m inufactui rs of the Uni
ted states is co.isi u iusIj 'de;iendent
upon our domestic wool production,.
Wool gro. ing an.l wool iu inutacLur-
ing aie mutual f rieuds, eacu depeii ie..t
upon tne outer. As tn il jcks increase
and spread in our new .-j.ates. in. mil. I
are planted 111 their mid.-t. inis con-J
liguity 01 cue uocks to tne ail , a.id ot
th t mill to .heco.1sd.ue4 if au ts ia great,
gain to a.l ,arue.
Toe manufacture ol w toi is th-j pre
cursor ot a geoer.t. 111 tnu.ac.ucrs. Iu
England, a ,ioteilion of lour cTulur-
ies to ihe wool i.uiutry iu lie ;n-r a na
tion of spiniuis and weavers, and of
anisaus su-feiuiary to llieiu. In this
country the woolen mill is snowu .o be
every where the pioueer ot a Ui ve i sided i
manufacture. ru..f sys em o. proiee-
tion and consumption proves itself to
be most economical to the people, which
makes consumption tue most abundant,
That our people are tiie mast abun-
dau.ly and subs.antially co.lied of any
iu the world needs no demonstration,
rne personal appearance of a pnpuia-
tion indicates is social coudition.
W001 growing, '.neivtore, is of ihe
firs: iniir autre to a nation, and should
receive 'he foslering are of govern
ment, sine-, upon i.. nines 1 ute .t ii-
veisity or nit muusirie.-, iutl a enc
and isunal attarance cf u
f Therefore, let tis form it State Wool
Grower's Association, an1 for this our-
pose you are earnestly reques ed to meet
nt Lincoln. Tuesday, ihe loth day
January, H73, for t!i piir-.s of form
ing such Association, and the transac
tion of such other business as may be
necessary to its support and continu
ance.
. Moses Stocking, )
, S. C. Cart, - Cora.
Jno. A. MacMurpht.
.. ' Insane Asylum.
Your correspondent visited the In
sane Asylum last week to inspect its
workings under the new Superinten
dent "Dr. Ma'.hewson of Omaha who
entered upon his duties a few days be-
I fun.. everything was looking very neat
Dr. very kmdK took us into and through
the various wards beginning with ward
No. 1, of the men, in which wereconfin
ed the less dangerous cases: the greater
number in here were at work around
the building engaged in various kinds
of labor, two from this ward are em
ployed in the kitchen washing dishes
etc , they are very faithful in their du
ties, some 10 or 15 were cleaning up
the rubbish around the building: :hey
seldom speak to each other, bu- keep
mumbling to themselves, the men in
this ward are the ouiy ones expected
to work, it keeps them busy, occupies
their thoughts aud pleases them. We
next were shown in ward No. 2, in
which were some 13 or 15, they are
perfectly rational on soin subjects
when if you speak on others tney are
roused in an instant and all their in
sanity returns, from here w- were
shown in ward No. 3, where all danger
ous subjects are kept, and are liable at
any minute to be changed into rav
ing maniacs; no labor of any kind is re
quired from these, we were very g!ad
when the door was close! between us
and the inmates of this ward. A keejw
er is constantly employed in each ward
so that he may quell at tfte start any
outbreak that might occur, and attend
t the wants of the i a- i nts. The anls
in. which the w j:ueii were c.i r.i lie.
ra!i'el in tui saaiij mtii-r i-i t i
S nth wi:g. i:i N. 1. ve-e con i e-l ta
less da ieroas, we noticed sojl 3 o.
engage! in qui'.tin they had an ovi
seer a id were very q aiet and orJeri;
'in.? iii.-uaUM of v U No 3, were oi:
t iking a walk which they do ev -rj
pltasaut day, they are alway accoai
pmied iv two or three ai.e.i 1 t:i s. lit
ward So. 3, are tii3 m ! li-ig-r uis
casus, they recoive VLry litl e exerei.-'-
on acoo ant of the ris they ru.i iu ai
lowing them out oi toe oui. liug, a I-
joiniog each ward are the at. end to o
rooms which were neatly indcv)mror;
a!ly filled up. Hath rooms a so a ljoi..
each ward. We were particularly struct
with the nea'u jss of the lining rooais.
a pleasant effect was produced byanei
woi k of vines suspended from the ceil
ing. Iu tre 3d wardtheinma.es an-
allowed no knives ami forks for fear
of misuse. There are now ninety-nint
uatients in tne Asvlum so mat two
are often obliged to occupy one room.
The asylum Farm consists of one hun
dred and sixty acres and produced
this yeir two thousand bushels of corn
and six hundred bushels of potatoes,
fourteen acres are set apart for garden
purposes and enough vegetables were
raised to fully supply -the wants of the
Hospital and will hav3 enough to last
during the winter. The building aud
its appoint in vits cost jll5,0 0and its
annual expenses are about: $3 J.0JO. It
s Mil? of the finest buildings m the
state.
D. II. Wheeler Jr.
The Faiitaus Morses of Venice.
But one of the most wonderful things
about Venice is that, with the exce.w
tsoti of those I intend to teli you about,
there are no horses there. How charm
iug it must be you think, when you
want to visit a friend, to ru.i down he
m irliV st --s if sunn- old nalac . sten
i - - t . , ,
into a gjudila, and glide swiftly and;
iiiiiittissl v itivav. itmtearl nf iolt ins ami '
. .. j . - - i
i tiinbiung along over the cobble-stones!
Aud then to come back by moonlight,
aud hear the low plash of the oar in
the water, and the distant voices of he
boatmen sinking si.tne love-siek song
oh. it's good as play 1 '
'Of cur?e there are no carts in Ve
nice; and the fish-man. the butcher, the
lu,ker, ai.u the candle fctick maker, al
iide softly along iu their boats to the.
kitchen door with their vendibles, and
chaffer ami haifule with the cook for
half an hour, after the manner of mar
ket men the world over.
.So you see the little olack-eyed Ve
netian boys and girls gsze on the braz
en hordes in St. Mai k's Square with as
much wonder and curiosi.y as ours
when we look npon a griffin or a uni-
COlll.
These horses there are four of them
have quite a history of their own.
They once formed part ol agroupmade
by a celebrated sculptor of antiquity.
named Lysippus. He was of such at-
kuo .fledged merit that be was one of
the three iucluded in the famous edict
of Alexander, which gave to Allies
the sole right of painting his portrait,
to Lysippus that of sculpturing his
form in any style, and to Pyrgoteles
that of engraving it upou precious
St'IH S. " - - -
Lysippus executed a groub of twn-y.-.uv-s
eij iestrian statues of t-'ie Mrs-
Jon an horses that fell at tho DAssa-!
- horses now at Ven ice formed a part.
They were carried from Alexandria to
Rome by Augustus, who placed them
of on his riumphal arch
fterward Nc-
ro. Domitian and Trajan, successfully
! tr iii.tunul li.tn In urplisa nl tliolr iiirn
W hen Constantine removetl the cap
ital of the Roman empire to the an
cient Bzantium. he sought to leautify
it by all means in his power, and for
this purpose be removed a great num
ber of works of art from Rome to Con
stantinople, and among them hese
bronze horses of Lysippus.
In the early part of the thirteenth
century the nobles of France and Ger
many, who were going on the fourth
crusade, arrived at Venice and stipula
ted with the Venetians for means of
transport to the Holy Land. But in
stead of proceeding to Jerusalem they
were diverted from their original in
tention, and. under the leadership, of
the blind old doge. Dandolo, they cap
tured the ci.y of Constantinople. The
fall of the city was followed by an al
most total destruction of th works of
art by which it had been adorned ; for
;he Latins disgraced themselves by a
more ruf bless vandalism than th. t o
ilie Vandals themselves.
But out of the wreck the four broi:z
horses were saved and carried iu ti i
umph to Venice, where they were ;1 1 : -
ed over the central porch of t. Alar
Cathedral. 1 here they sto d unt ' Na
poleon rJoLSipartt in 17t7n rucvec theur
with other tiophits to I ar is, tut a a
ins uowni. li tney were rtrMt te . i
as Byrou says in "Chil-'e il .iol P:
Reforest. Mar-at. I gl -b vs; ''-.
Their elided c .lur. g at rliu i'l t is I '.
Mary Lloyd. .St. Nicholas for Dec,
Miss Alcott's Life at Concord.
Twenty years ago, Miss Alcott re
turned to Concord with her family,
who have ever since resided here. It
was there that most of her books were
w ritten, and many of her slories take
that town for their starting-point. It
it was in Concord that -Beth" died,
and there the "Little Men" now live.
.uiss Alcott herself has oen iwo or
arue years in Europ sinc 136. and
i ts sj.n- s'trar i' w:nt.r-i i:i 3 s: :i or
Ne w York. but hersu nm ts are usually
o.ts.sed in Concord, where sh lives wi.h
ae- fath t aa I noh in . pi ?tnr.squ-
d !i us, u i l-?r a .var a ii'.l-si le, vith
hi orchard around it and a pine-wood
.i the hill-top behind. Close by is an-
h.r house, where Mr. Hawthorn lived
ad wrote several of his fam us lKKks,
and it w is a!onz the old Lexingto : road
: i fro a of these ancien . houses th.r
thrt B itish Grena Hers :n trche 1 and re-
i ea.ed on the il ty of tha b tttle of Con-
ord in April, 1775.
If you sli ui.'d see Miss Alcott. you
A'ouIJ like her face much better than
anv picture of it. She ha3 large, dark-
due eyes, brown clustering hair, a firm
out smiling mouth, a noble head, and
a tall and stately presence, as becomes
tie who is dessended from the May;
Q'lincys and Sewalls, of Massachusetts,
ml th- Alco ts and B ion sons of Con
nection.. From them she has inherited
th- oest New England trai a, courage
and iu 1p nideiice wit'ioat pride, a just
anl compassionate spirit, s.rongly do- I
mestic habits, good sense, and a warm I
heart. In her books you perceive these j
qualities, do you not? and notice, too,
iier vigor or ner rancy, me nowing
huaior that m tkes her stories now droll
aud now pathetic, a keen eye for ch ir-
acter, aud the most cheerful tone of
mind. From the hard experience of
life she has drawn lessons of pitience
and love, and n w with lur, as the
apostle says. "abide. h f tkh, hopj, char-
ty. these hree; but the greatest of
these is charitv. There have been
men, and soma wa.n:i to , who could
practice well the heavenly virtue of
charity towards the world at large, and
wita .a general atmosphere effect, but
could not always bring K down to
earth, and train k in the homely, crook
ed paths of household care. But those
who have seen Miss Alcott at home
know that sa?a is n it hr pnetice. Iu
the las . summer, as for years before
the citizen or the visitor who walked
the Concord s rects might have seen
this a linired woman doing errands for
her father, mother or sister, or neph
ews, an I as attentive to hr fanily as
if she were oilv th'ir. b ittsek fp r.
lu the tuck-room she has been their
nurse, iti ta excursion their guide, in
the evening amusements their compan
ion and entert liner. Her g-od fortune
has been theirs, and she has denied
herself other plwisures for the satisfac-
tion tf giving c-imfor and p'easure to
them. From an artie'e by F B. .3- St.
Ncho'as for December.
School's Out
Did you ever pause and contemplate
the particular and peculiar phase of
human nature developed by the exis ant
scho'. - 1oy when released frcm study
and discipline when "school is out,"
and he is on his way home?
Ordinary humanity, when released
from the toils of the day, is prone to
seek rest and reiaxa'ion. The boy
scorns all such "ffVrninate idests. He is
composed of but thre parts legsf
arms and yell, an I the yell is the blg-
gest part of him. His legs and arms
have been kept in irksome om iuls ry
qui" trie all d iv, and mus now Jh ex
ercise -. his voice h;wlKen seethinir and
swe 'inj in hini fo- h-iur. a-i 1 now
wist have vent. "
As sc,n as h U clear f tha school-
bams etepa, he deliberately yella a :
yell that is ear-splitting, but has not PQJ TJI HOUSEHOLD.
moie object meaning or direction than I
the midnight vociferation of a mule and """
yet it appears at a full run with his With a very handsome biid catre,
arms flyingabout like the scintillations the following beautiful piece of poetry
of a pin-wheel. lie is no respector of was found on the occasion of tLo tin
persons and is utterly indifferent as to wedding last week.
whether he runs down a smaller boy,
spins an aged citizen three times around
or smashes a girl's hat over her eyes in
his headlong career.
"Mercy on us! If that boy was only
mine I'd but then her own boy flies
past, falls over a dry-goods box, bounces
up, kicks another boy, and chases
across the streat and around the corner
vcivic Diiu vmi fet-V tne j uu iiuuci ii
with which she intends to annihilate
him. out of her astonished throat.
There is but one thing that has the
slightest soothing .effect on tha boy
when he is on his way home from
school. He can see his old man furth
er than Prof, Hale can see a hay stack
with a telescope, and the moment that
parent dawns upon his vision he be
comes as a model letter-writer, and the
neatly modulated tone with which he
woeedles the author of his being out
of five cents on the spot is a lesson for
future ambitious savings-bank and
passenger railroad presidents.
The amount of racing, jumping,
pulling, booting howling that a school
boy concentrates into a transit of two
squares is positively astonishing, and
the pcrternatura' coolness and the qui
etude with which he takes his red face
and panting, breath into the kitchen
and asks if supper ain't most ready is
a human conumdrum that calls un
qualified admiration, Free Press.
See if punctuation will make the
following lines any less absurd:-
I saw a pigeon making bread;
I saw a girl composed of thread;
I saw a towel one mile square;
I saw a meadow in the air;
I saw a rocket walk a mile;
I saw a pony make a file;
I saw a blacksmi.h make a box;
I saw an orange kill an ox;
I saw a butcher ra ide of s.eel ;
I saw a penknife dance a reel;'
I saw a sailor twelve feet high;
I saw a ladder in a pie:
I saw an apple fly away;
I saw a sparrow making hay;
I saw a farmer like a dog;
I saw a puppy mixing grog;
I saw three men who saw these too,
And will confirm what I tell vou.
"Settle Up, John."
John Brown, a middle-aged negro,
was charged by his laundress, Nancy
DraKe, with disturbing the peace. It
was a question of forcibly removing
a pledge. Nancy had been getting up
his shirts aud collars for some months
and he had paid her in nothing but
promises, and when, last week, he took
round his overcoat to gee the centen-
nial Tear creases ironed out of it she
congealed to it and dec ined to surren-
der it until he paid up.
Now, Jej." the defendant ssked
"You has an obercoat Y
The Court nodded assent,
"Now, Jej, sposin a woman got hold
oh your obercoat dis yer cole wedder
an utteily de-clined to gib up de same
jes bekase you owed her a few bits fo
washm out things.
"Oh, bress de Lawd. a few
bits!
Seven dollars and foah bits he
me, nor coun.in ae wasuiu 1 nao on
hand."
"Spos'n a woman played dat ah dirt
on you. Jej, what'd yer do, eh ?"
"Well, I think I'd pay her up
and
get my coat."
"Wha-a-t! Pay right up squah!"
"Yes, sir."
"You wouldn't lam the wooly
old
head off her?"
"No, sir."
"N" mo wud I, Jej au' the man that
wud ouht ter be "
"Fined S3 and cos s," the Court broke
in. when the curtain fell and the exhi
bition closed for .he day.
Locality for Orchards.
In almost all cases it is the universal
xp -i ience that orchards are more cer-
2 a. n . . a .a a. I
am to uo wen wnere ine spot cnosen
is somewhat higher than the surround-
ing land. Often enough the fruit will
le killed by Spring frosts, when those
on land fifty feet higher will escape.
The cold air will always sink, and if
there is any low spot for it to sink in
the higher of course escapes. Often
trees on river-banks esraue. when oth-
ers are injured, and people think it is
the contiguity to water, when it is
really the elevation the cooler air be
ing drawn to th river-bed. Garden
er's Monthlv.
Capt. Eads is to leave a lasting marR
of his hand in the East, as he has al
ready done in the Wes. Having bridg
ed the Mississippi at St. Louis and
deepened its m tilth a: the Gulf, he is
now ii bridge tha B isphorus aud lead
the fide of travel to India through the
Valley of the Euphrates.
V Lowell firm sent a lot of biils west
for eolhc in. The lis' came btck
with m name marked "dead." Three
mou.hs after the sara bill got m o a
new lot, an. 1 when th" list came back
the nan was marked "still dead.'
Ten Years.
Ten little years ago, dear loe.
Ten Utile years, iio more.
That happy morning came, hkc which
None ever dawned before ;
That blessed morulug when the earth
Wore all her blessed charms ;
That morning when the heavens came down
And c!asied us lu its arms ;
That morning wheu upon your hand.
Your band no white and small,
I placed the symbol of our lovs
Frail bond. If that were all.
Some words I know, were said, a vow
Was given, a prayer, a kiss,
Aud through and over all a trau?
Confused sense of bliss.
They have been very happy years,
Happy and glad and true ;
I will not thiuk what lire had been
To me unblessed by you ;
Aud every day I bless that ilay
Whose tender, roseate glow
litis never faded yet, de;ir wife.
Full well we both do know.
Twas not t'ae words the f nn.oii sail
Hint made us one : tho years.
With all their many, many Joys.
Their triumphs, losses, tears .
The years, with all they have denied.
And all that have been given I
Of gsod and ill and many friends
Walling for them in lieavu
Uave all been life's true niiui-teis.
And helped to make us one ;
So may ic be until the end
Till all our work is done !
Tnen, in the perfect Suinmerlaud.
The love begun in this
Shall bloom forever ou the hlsli
Eternal hills of bliss.
A lump of wet saleratus applied t
the sting of a wasp, or spider, or bee
will stop the pain almost instantly, and
I prevent all swelling of tho part. It
seems a specific for insect poison.
IIousEKEEPixa. "Word of graco to
woman; word that makes her tho
earthly providence of her family, that
wins gratitude and attachment from
those at home, and a good repcrt of
those that are without. Success in
housekeeping adds credit; to tho wo
man of intellect, and lustre to a wo
man's accomplishments. It is a know
ledge which it is as discreditable for
any woman to be without as for a man
not to know how to make a living, or
how to defend himself when attacked.
ITe may be ever so good an artist, ever
so polished a gentleman, if deficient in
these points of self-preservation you
set him down for a weakling, and hU
real weight in society goes for very lit
tle. So, no matter bow talented a
woman may be. or how useful in tho
church society, if she is an indiffereut
housekeeper it is fatal to her influence,
a foil to her brilliancy and a blemish
in her garments." Extract frooi th
Home Cook Book.
Potatoe Frittep-s. Grate six
cold boiled potatoes; add one pint of
I sat s .
cream or mux, ana nour euougn to
U)aKe 8"" lKe oiner irers; ine yoiKi
01 uiree es'' tnen ine "eaten wnues;
I salt, anu iry 111 not lard, mey
are delicious.
Apple Fiutters. Beat three egg
very light, then stir in one teaspoonf ul
of salt, one tablespoon!" ul of sugar, tho
I grated rind of half a lemon, and the
j juice, one pint of milk, two cups of
I chopped apple, and two cups of flour;
loftr it urol 1 trtrit Imr iinl frv In l?irr1 r-
cau be baked on a griddle as pancakes,
sift sugar over them, and send to the
table.
Family Pie Paste. One cofl'eo cup
ful of flour will make the paste for a
medium sized pie. Use three-fourths.
of a cup of shortening to each cup of
flour; yon may use. all butter, or part
lard if preferred Take one-third of
the shortening, a little salt, and rub
well into the flour with the hand, then
stir in as little water as possible, and
form with a spoon into a very stiff
d ugh .m t on a pie board roll lightly ant!
spread with one third of the remain
ing shortening; sprinkle on a little
flour, fold, and roll out enough for the
a - . rr . 1 . . - 4 1.--
u"uw c,u,u v :u
uaste spread on half of the remaining
blltter f0M ad roll as before; repeat
tn4 process, roll thin and use for tho
er crust. Always make a few
8lUs jnthe centre of the upper crust to
lo the staam to escape. Never put
In tne fliijng until you are ready to
bake them A nice pie will ie brown.
tender, and flanky.
Trifle. Make sponge cake. If dry
all the better. Turn over some rasp-
berry syrup, and let stand until just be
fore you serve. Make a rich custard and
turn over. This is very nice.
Chocolate Meringue. Dissoho
three tablespoonf uls corn starch in two
tablespoonfuls milk; break up two"
ounces sweetened chocolate in a tin
basin, over boiling water, and to it add
gradually the rest of a pint of milk:
stir until perfectly smooth and when
it is scalding pour In the starch, and
stir until it thickens; then add tut
yolk of three eggs beaten with two
large spoonfuls of sugar, and stir until
much thicker than soft custard, anl
when somewhat cooled, add one tea-
spoonful vanilla, and pour it into n
glass dish. Just before serving (when
it must be perfectly eoMj, cover it
with a meringue of the whiles ol egs
beaten stiff, with four tablespoonf uls of,
sugar. ""
0
r