Nebraska herald. (Plattsmouth, N.T. [Neb.]) 1865-1882, August 23, 1877, Image 1

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    THE HERALD.
ri T ni a
JD.
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
H hK H. A
Auvr.KTiKixt; uatf.m.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA
SI'Ai'K.
1 W.
1 111
Sri. ; n in.' 1 yr.
1 S'tr... $1 H If I i'.'oi ?2:V) v-.oo , i ii jr. 01
2 s:r.. : i vo) a " tA ! i
3 .' 2lo 2 ' 4V 4 ;."' R;.t.! I.t Vl- fii-'
lul..; 6 CO K 0(1 J'lllll !?! '.'OI'O "'
'., ol..t S 00' 1200 Hon IH'lll "Slcl OH-) MIM
1 !...' 1,") (Ml, t-i 00 l 00 Oil 40 4l 00 -'ttOH
f tfA!l Advertising I - i 1 1 i;n;irtti!y.
; ?-Transient i'.On rlisi-n.cu: must l'-"" -h!-I
for in advance.
- OFFICE:
On Vine St., One Block North of Main,
Comer of Fifth Street.
JNO. A. MACMURPEY, Editor.
" PERSEVERANCE CONQUERS
TERMS: $2.00 a Year.
I-iAltJKHT llTIATIO OK AY
l'.it'ltl. CASS COtXTY.
Terms, in Advance:
One. copv, nrw year
ne copy, s-ix inontli.s
)u copy, three months
.$2.00
. l.oo
. .50
VOLUME XIII.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 1877
NUMBER 22.
Extra e .')-" f tiie IlM! vi ii fur :i1e !y .1. I".
Youn, IV-lofiiee news depot , stud O. F. Jolili
son.cnrner ol Main ami Filth N!ict Is.
T5E HERALD.
A
PIEST
National Bank
OF PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA,
81TCCESSOK TO
TOOTM; IfAXXA A CliAUIi.,
John Fitzc.ebali) President.
K. (J. IIovkv Vice President.
A. V. Mi'.Al';n .IN. . Cashier.
Jdxii O'Uolmckk Assistant Cashier.
This Hank Is now npen for Imsiiiess at their
new room, corner Main and Sixth streets, and
im prepared to transact a general
BANKING BUSINESS.
Stacks, Bonds, Gold, Government and Local
Securities
P.OUCIIT AXI) SOLD.
Deposits Received and Interest Allow
ed on Time Certificate.
Avail:ill."i hi anv part of the United St.ites and
In nil the Principal Towns and Cities
of Europe.
AGIIXTS FOR THE
CELEBRATED
INMAH-LINE AND ALLAN LINE
OF HTKAMEEH.
Fer-jon w i 'siting to liring out their friends from
Europe can
I'uncnASE TirsicTs fjmm rs
Thronsh to I'lattNmontli.
tn
x
o
3
C3
crJ
g W a
3 i D S
2 1 g
p-i-
!25
o
o o
w
CJO
7? ni
S 3
CO
c3
O
CO
a
o
o
$-1
O
Excelsior Barber Shop.
J. O. BOONE,
3 fain Street, opposite Saunders Ifoiise.
HAIR-CUTTING,
ESPECIAL ATTENTION" CIVEN TO
I'utiiii? liildi eFi'sasitl Lartics'
K3air.
CALL AND SEE liOOXK, EXTS,
An I ir't a boon-" in a
CXitE-TSr SHAVE.
YILLIAM HEROLD
Keeps one of the
Largest Stocks
OF
CER
IN TOWN.
l'liOMMKTOR OF
PALACE BILLIARD HALL.
(Main St., east of Eirst Nat. Bank.)
PLATTSMOl'TS!, ... IVKS?
TIV ItAlt I PUPPI.lr.I) WITil TilK
BEST WINES, LIQUORS,
BEEH, ETC., ETC. 4rtyl
V O I ?i IS 21 Y
AND
Machine &1iqj&!
JOHIT WAYMAIT,
I'l.ATTSMon ii, xr.i;.,
IWpairer of Steam Enyine, Unlcr?,
Saw and Grist 21 iW
A"I ST K A 31 FITTi-s;;H,
Vr"')!ii!t Iron Tipo. force and Lift Piiifs.Sl'-am
i iaiu:"s. S;!ffty-'a!ve (Jovenioi-s. and all
kinds of iirass Eii'rinc Fit;i:i,
rvpyiied on short notU-e.
FARM MACHINEKK
Repaired on Short Notice. 4yl
YO UNG !"
C" always he found at Halt's Old
Stand, rendu to sell the lent 2Ieat--i.
YOl'MI buys fieh fat cattle, st.ccp, hotr &e.
'. iieet from the faiMers every day, and his
meats are always jood.
CAME, FISll. -l.YX FOWL, IX SEASOX
m 5yl
SAGE BROTHERS,
Dealers in
ETC., ETTC, ETC.
One Door East of the Post-Office, Fluttsniouth,
Nebraska.
... : o :
Practical "Workers in
SHEET IRON, ZINC, TJX. BI2A
ZIERY, tt-e., it-c.
Large assortment of Hani ana Soft
COAL STOVES,
Wood and Coal Stoves for
HEATING OR COOKING,
Alwavs on Hand.
Every variety of Tin, Sheet Iron, and Zinc
Work, kept iu Stock.
MAKING AND REPAIRING,
Done on Short Notice.
tsrErERTTHixa warraxted : :3
' ikicj:s T.OW lOWX.
. u " SAGS BROS.
svw 4
4rtvl
m It J;-S 'V4i fCi
T-f '" JS
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
PT 4 JflC 7l"aznil!rMit (Iran .w eGSO,
1 IflliU'J Pi'csi'iviiiu l lauos only inusi
flDP A 7JCl!,e fold. Fi(i iiM(vooil I'p
UnunflliSi'ivJit Piiuas iitll h1 ;o!4t
$XOO only .5:55. Parlor r- tus 2 stops sr., 9
stops iv5 12 nuns only $75. Nearly new 4 Set
Heed 12 Stoii Sni Bass and t'oajder Orjran S-Vi,
run tivT .j . j-iwesi I'li' iMi vn on-i-fi
on 15 day- lest trh'P Yoo as, why I olTer so
cheap? I answer Hani Tiim I't'M) employ
ees inii-'t havi 'rk. Kesi.lt of w;ir coiisiueiic
pd im nit- ! t'n- iii-mopolif-ts. Hat'.!e ra-'ioj;.
I'articul.-irs friM'. Adlrfs la?iiel l-'.Hfiillj',
AYaMiiinstun. SfW Jersi-y. ion -
O CFANCY CARDS all newMy!3 with tiaine, 10
utJeis. ost paid..f.B.IIUHted, Nassau. Co. N. Y.
l...l-ll..:i..nl
" 3Qyk VJL P:r.pa:S to cy reader
S c!S&ier. Twee Bet fer
bO eett. In Car
' &Vl7? fl rimcy or Prampo.
Ks-sr ;i rarZitj! HILLKITS ZAOSB FOS lit
:4!MKl Auents wantfil for the
CROSS MM CBBSCBHT
By the eminent a. ItrocUctt. Unfold the
ctraiie Mocial. polilicul. and r-lisiu,
peculiarities and Iiintorv of the Huxsviut and
Turk, cause of t he w.iT.thi'jlit'.i iritere"li at stake ;
Biographic of Ilulem, etc, rieily Slluwtriit
Eor terms, ad.liess quickly, HUB BAUD
BUOS.. luh., 30 JiSaile St., Chicago, Ills.
A GR E AT 0 FFER! ! EnV'1"?;
Ii:rr! t s;u di-jiO'st? f I I'UXOX St
tA..lv aii-lserooJ hand nf 1rmt
riniiiiinakcrs iiirludiiiur t ATKilH' at
lvr prircM for -a-Ii or inntal Intent- r
to let until iin'il forthna ovr lrref
ferod. 'v..T:l?, kam MM.Aiii;
uni "iis jiar ii4s4 ai ie
as 1-; ii.-vi 'rir,iit xmv
MM VK.V::: A.i ISOrillllHiare the
IIKWT iSAII- 7 Octavo I'iauos iS 1 50.
71-: ilo nHt not a j'l-ar. """-I'' Stop
irrai s. - NlwynMSS. 7 ritops 6S.
top73. lllh'twpsSSS. ia Htot SIOO
(!). iml iiiMl ;v y car, in irfc-ot orlr
aiuiwnrrnntcd. !,: A l.nnilri'H A VEL
XUAIi)'.Ts WA.'TS:i). liluMtratetl
('atale'.'ues M :iled. Aiiheral discount to teaeii
ers.iiniiiler. chinches. Aj". Sheet nuisie at half
price. iio:!A('l! WATEKS & S( INS. Maoufac
turers a;d ilealt-rs, iOEat Hth St., near Broad
way New Y01 k. 2!U
ONLY FIVE DOLLARS
FOR AN ACRE!
Of the best land ia AMEP.ICA near the cheat
l.MO.N PAi IKKJ RAILBOAn.
A FARM FOR S200.
In easy pitj cicnts -wltJt low ratc. of
inter? r.t,
SECURE IT NOW!!!
Full inf.'nnaiion eent free, address,
O. i . DAV1N, Iind A-sent, U. P. Ii. H.
OMAHA, NKJS.
DS. JAS. CHARLES.
Emm-',i.,BiTi,
OFFICER : Xo.C."J and
Frij!H;:x r4t., - - i!ia!ia, Xcb.
J'-Ireiervatioii of t In- rVutural Teeth
fa.io a fpoci.ilty-.
Oldest p"a-tiffn Dentist in the City.
""jTcHAftBERS,
M tnur.'.ctarer or iv.nl Dealer In
,2u mZ .-'u j
SADPIES.
COLL A US.
II ALTERS,
wniiK-u
ETC., ETC., .ETC.
REPAIRING
Bona vitli Neatness! Dispatch.
The on'v place in t'vn where '"Turh'y's pat
ent sell aijustal.'le liorse collars are told."
4!ini6
HO FOIl THE
.Y i'Z.i TTS2I0UTII.
A.I t'lliAS STOKF.
O F
:-M. -'IL'IEE'S old tan i ull kept t-pen by
tlie above.
CIGARS. TOJi AC COS, AC. WHOLE
SALE tt- RETAIL.
W V. K K V V
Gcocl Gocds, Buy" Largely
. And invite trr.ae to e:C. and examine, ltf
(iwiil fresli milk
DELIVERED tAILY !
AT
EVER YEOD IS J fOM E IXl'LA TTS1Z0VTU
IF TifKY WANT IT, I!Y
J. F. Hi: lOIEJSTCR.
SEND IS YOLBOKPKRS AVT I WILL. IKY AND
UIVK VOlf
40yl and serve you rtgularly.
O. F. JOHNSON,
DEALER IN
Drugs? JTedicines?
- -
All Paper Trimmed Free of
Charge.
ALrO DEALEK IX
Stationery, Magazines,
AND
Latest Publications.
rreseriptiOH Careriilly Compcnoded
by an Experienced Irnsi?t.
REMEMBEE THE PLACE.
COR. FIFTH & JIAIN S1REETS
PLATTSMOUTH. NEB.
PKOFESSIOXAL CA11DS
NAM 31 fIIAI'3IAX.
ATTOItNEY AT LAV and Solicitor in Chan
f.-Tv. Office in Fitzgerald's Block, Flattsmouth
JelrasKa.
II.II.WHEELEKACO.
LAV' OFFICE, Beal Extate. Fire and Lifeln-
S'lriinco Atents. Plrtttsmouth, Nebraska. Col
lectors, tax-jiayers. Have a complete abstract
of titles. Buy and geil real entate, negotiate
loans, inf. iyi
i:iAn i. sTiiXK,
ATTORNEY AT LAV. office with D. II. Jl
heeler & Co., Plattsniouth, Neb. 15yl
JASIKS K. 3IOKRINOX.
ATfOKXEY AT LAW. Will practice in Cass
and adjoining Counties : cives special attention
to collection and abstracts nf title. Onice with
Oeo. S. Smith, Fitzgerald Block, Plattxmnuth,
eLr;isk;u .10
it it L,ivixiSToar,
PHYSICIAN & SCBGEOX. tenders his pro
fessional services to the citizens of Cass county.
Residence southeast corner Sixth anil Oak sts.
Oitice on Main street, two doors west of Sixth,
Plattsniouth, Nebraska.
c;ko. H. SMITH.
ATTOTtNE Y AT LAW and Real Estate Bro
ker. SH"cial attention iriven to Collections
ana an mailers uiici-uiii 111c iilic iu ir.u ?ri.iit-.
Office on 2d floor, over Post Office. Plattsniouth,
Nebraska. i.
JOIIX XV IIAIXF.8
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, ana collector of
debts, collections made from one dollar to one
thousand dollars. Mortjjnses, Deeds, and oth
er instruments draw n, and all comity business
usually transacted before a Justice of the Peace.
Best of reference given it requireu.
Oflice on Alain street, West of Court nouse.
40-yl JOHN W. HAINES.
1K. J. M. M ATKUJIAX,
Physio Medical Practitioner.
1ntixriUe, Ca Co., Xeb.
Always at the office on Saturdays. 40yl
PLATTSMOUTH MILLS.
rLATTSMOUTH, NEB.
C. HEISEL, - Proprietor.
Flour, Com 3Ioal, & Feed
Alwavs 011 hand and for sale at lowest cash
prices. The highest prices paid for Whuat
Corn, particular attention lven custom work.
SAUNOEilS HOUSE.
J.S.GREGGCIY, - - - Proprietor,
Location Central. Good Sample Room..
Every attention paid to guests. 4jin3
Pr.ATTSTUOUTK, - - - - Nkh,
C03I3IEKCIAL HOTEL,
LTNC0LX, XEEL,
J.J.I2III0FF, - - - Proprietor.
The best known and most popular Landlord
in the Slate. Always stop at tne Commercial.
'GRAND CENTRAL'
HOTEL,
Lnret't aad finest ESulel bc
tivecn Cliicasro and San
"ra 11 ciixco.
GEO. THRALL, - - Prop.
OMAHA. XEI).
O, I. SALOON.
I keep constantly on baud
Iiosi's Milwaukee IJccr.
which can be had at no other
PLACE IN THE CITY.
Also the best of
W1XES, LIQUORS, AXD CIGARS.
sniati K1. Knsrnbauni.
I.ENH OFF ct- B0NNS,
3Iorniiig Dow Saloon !
One door east of the Saunders House. AVe
keep the best of
Beer, Wines, Liquors & Cigars.
f 3m9 Constantly on Hand.
A Gireat ICedurtion in Irice of
GUNS, REVOLVERS, &c.
Prices reduced from 20 to 30 per cent. Write
for Illustrated Catalogue, with reduced prices
for 1S77. Address,
GREAT WESTERN GUN WORKS,
01 Smithfield St.. Pittsburgh, Pa. lSyl
H. A. WATERMAN & SON,
Wholesale and Uetail Dealers in
Pine Lumber,
SHIFQLES,
Sash,
Doors,
Blinds,
ETC.. ETC., ETC. '
Mai,i street. Comer of Fifth,
rLATTSMOUTJI, - - - - XEB.
Still Better Rates for Lumber.
STll EIGHT & MILIEU,
Harness Manufacturers,
SADDLES
BKIDLES,
COLLARS.
and all kiiids of harness stock, constantly on
hand.
Fruit Confectionery,
AND
Grocery Store
NUTS,
CANDIES,
TEAS
COFFEES,
SUGABS,
TOBACCOES,
FLOUE,
AC.
Keinember t lie place opposite E. G. Dovey's
on Lower M tin Street.
2-y'
STHEIG1IT tf- MILLER.
AND!
BEST FARMING LANDS
IN NEBRASKA,
FOB SALE BY
IX XEUKAKKA.
Great Advantages to Buyers
IN 1877.
Ten Tears Credit at 6 per cent Interest.
Six Years Credit at G per cent Interest,
and 20 per cent Discount.
Other Lilicrnl DNponnts For Casii,
Kelate on 1'iires and freight,
antl I'reiuiuiu.H tor Improve
meutn. ramphlet and 3fanf. containins full partlc-ulai-s.
will he mailed free to any part of the
world on application to
LAND COMMISSIONER. B. M. K. R.
10 Vl Ll&COLX. Necba&ka
kmx
NOT LOST.
A Siorjr of Love and Constancy.
Let me recount to you a true love
story ; a story of love pure and unde
filed love as it was in the beginning,
is now, ever shall be, world without
end. For love is all thing3 in one to
us. It i3 hope and fear and joy and
despair; it is truth and it is falsehood;
it is anything, in short, that you are
pleased to call it, or it can represent
the brightness of heaven or the black
ness of perdition.
"Love Is a melting of the soul."
It was late in the afternoon of a dull
autumnal day that a group of young
people came chatting down the flight
of stor.e steps leading from the door of
a cathedral church in an old Atlantic
seaport town. They were members of
the choral society attached to the
church, ad they had evidently been
there for rehearsal. "Within, this great
building yawned black and lonely, save
in the gallery, where, over the organ, a
gas jet sprung rays of light in the gloom
and the sound of softly subdued voices
broke thro' the stillness.
The visible occupants were two a
man and a maiden young, both, and
with the cabalistic word, "lovers,"
gleamed, as did the mysterious hand
writing on the wall, on their foreheads.
Robert Field, the organist. w.'i3 turning
over some sheet3 of manuscript music
wich an absorbed air, while by his side
stood Hester IIethersleigh, her pretty
face full of anxious interest as she
watched his movements. A little cloud
of uneasiness wrinkled her forehead
now and then as she saw the rent edg
es of angry clouds scud by the narrow
slit of window going to the east, where
the gray sea lay tossing stormily.
"Well, Robert," she said at last, drop
ping her slim hand on his shoulder,
"Well, Robert, what is it?"
The musician's dark, serious face
lighted for a moment gloriously, as he
turned and took the little ungloved
hand in his.
MI asked you to stay, Hester, because
I wish to play for you some passages
from my new piece. I shall submit
it to the society at ilusic Hall to-mor
row, ana, llester, l want your opinion
in ad va rice."
The young girl laughed a little, rip
pling laugh of gleeful enthusiasm.
My opinion! Why, Robert, you know
beforehand what that will bo. It
would be nothing but a form asking
it."
Robert raised the little hand tender
ly to his lips.
"I know that love makes gentle crit
ics of us all," he said wisely. ''But
now I want you to forget who is the
author of this melody and to exercise
your judgment without stint. Re
member, too, that love is the theme
love which, wisely or unwisely, hopes
all thing, believes all things, and en
dures all things un.o the end." And
then he turned to the organ. lie play
ed slowly at first. It was a lovely open
ing, full of strange, sad chords-as if a
soul were waiting somewhere in the
shadow. Then, as a brightness entered,
the theme asserted itself, Those won
derful tones climbed higher and high
er, expressive of a great faith, of a fond
mad triumph and bewildering joy. On
and on the chords swept; it was a3 if
a living chain of light ran round the
world.
When he had fiaished there was a si
lence for a moment between these two.
The lingering echoes rolled back and
forth until one by one they too escaped
into the stillness. Then Hester Ileath-
ersleigh stooped, and, with quivering
ips and tear-wet eyes, reverently kiss
ed the bowed forehead of her lover.
'0h, my darling!" she cried, "it is so
beautiful! I am so proud of you. "Who
taught you to play like that ?"
A proud and satisfied smile curved
Robert Field's lips as he listened. "My
ove for you taught me," he said. "My
love for you, which is so great, so all
absorbing, that my music seems to be
but a poor expression of it.
Then lifting her head he gazed for a
moment with wistful tenderness into
the rose-pink beauty of her small, sweet
face. " You think it is a triumph, then.
dear? Ah, Hester, are you sure you
speak for the music itself, or only out
of a tender mercy born of vour love
for me?"
An indignant light brightened the
pretty violet eyes out of the drowsy
languor of youth's enchanting dreams.
"Tender mercy for you," she repeated.
Then her voicechanged. "Ah, Robert!
if my love can make you write like
that now, then your future shall be
full of inspiration, for I shall love you
more and more the longer I know you.
I shall love j-ou more and more forev
er!" She wound her arm about his neck
and with tender, maiden sweetness
kissed his forehead, kissed his wavy
hair, and kissed the thin, pale hand
which lay nervelessly on the yellow
organ keys. And then a stillness crept
about them a stillness more fraught
with eloquent joy than any measure of
golden speech could have been.
While they thus stood hand in hand
talking, the curtain behind them par
titioning off the 'long gallery parted,
and a dark face peered through. It
was a man's face, hsjidsome but cruel
in that purple gloom of gathering shad
ow. It was no friendly face, either,
that, with its many changes of hate
and jealous anger, and furious despair
seemed, while the lovers talked, to be
playing a dark and stormy accompani
ment to the idyl of their love.
A sudden, angry burst of wind at the
narrow window roused them unpleas
antly to a sense of night and the near
ing storm.
vUh, the rain! cried Hester, with a
pale face,
stay, and
"How thoughtless of us to
you have that long, deso-
late walk over the cliffs in the dark!
"Xever mind," cried Robert, stoutly.
"Therare such light and warmth
withi.i me that I shall not heed a pass
ing touch of wind and water. I will
see vou to your door first, and then
good-night."
"My cousin Conrad promised to come
for me," Hester answered. "I wonder
what detains him. It is too bad for
me to take you all this long way out
of your route."
"I like it better so, the young man
said gravely. "I do not like your cous
in, Conrad, and I am not willing to
trust you to his care. Oh, my darling!
he went on earnestly, "if my music but
brings me fame and fortune I can then
make you all my own, and there will
be no more good nights, no more part
ing in the storm for us."
They passed down the stairs and out
into the street together, unconscious
of the shadow closing upon them, near
er and blacker. At the door of Hes
ter's home they parted with a lingering
good-by. s
"My precious music," cried Robert,
buttoning his coat closer about him.
"Xo harm must coma to that. It rep
resents fame and fortune and love and
honor for thee and me, my darling."
Hester lifted a small, wet face to
peer into the gloom. "I wish you could
stay," she said. And oh, Robert, be
careful of the cliffs the path is so
lonely and dangerous. I shall come
early to rehearsal to-morrow for the
sake of knowing that you are safe."
"Do!" he answered. "I shall bring
you. glad tidings. Success is too near
for me to miss it now. Good-night,
good-night my sweet-heart !" And so
speaking he passed from her into the
shadow of his waiting doom.
After that night of storm the day
dawned clear and cold. At St. Paul's
the Choral Society, just then in the
first flush of enthusiasm over a new
oratorio, gathered early. One two
three! the great bells chimed the hours,
and the singers waited patiently for
their leader. Something had detained
him, most likely; lie would come soon!
The hour struck four and he had not
come, and Hester Ileathersleigh, with
a heart heavy as lead in her bosom,
fell on her knees in an agony of pray
er. '-0!i. my God!" she cried, reckless
of who might hear hsr, "he is dead. My
Robert is dead! He has been lost in the
cruel storm."
Some one, pitying, touched her arm.
It was her cousin, Conrad Charteris;
he was looking down at her with a pale
face a face paler far than that with
which he had spied upon her yesterday
behind the gallery curtain. Her pite
ous cry had touched even his stony
heart.
"Hush!" he whispered, "here is news j
from him from Robert; come and
hear what it is."
A note had been brought by a swift
running messenger, and a shudder ran
round the waiting circle of listeners
when its contents were made known.
It was signed by the leading phj'sician
of the city, and stated that Robert
Field had been picked up that morn
ing at the foot of the cliffs and taken
home for dead. He was now, at the
date of writing, lying in an insensible
condition, and it was impossible to tell
what the extent of the injuries were,
or if there were any hope of his ulti
mate recovery.
A horror-stricken silence followed
the reading of the note, broken at last
by a low, sobbing cry from Hester
Heathersleigh's white lips.
"I must go to him oh, I must go to
him! Who will take me ? You ! you I"
and she caught Conrad Charteris by the
arm.
He shrank away from her with a
gesture, much as if she had pierced him
with a knife. His black eyes dilated
horribly. If I go with you to see him ?''
he cried. "What are you thinking of?
What do you take me for ?" Then not
ing her astonished look he made a
fierce struggle for composure; but his
hand shook like withered leaves. "Why
do you wish to go to him?" he ques
tioned angrily. "He would not recog
nize you and it is no place for you!
Let me take you home."
She snatched up her shawl and bound
it with trembling fingers about her
shoulders. "I tell you I shall go to
him," she answered. "I was to have
been his wife, and living or dead, my
place is now by his side. You can
come with me if you like!" And she
flew down the steps.
It seemed an age to her, that short
time she was on the road leading to
the lonely house of Robert Field's wid
owed mother; and when at last, by dint
of her prayers and tear3, she was suf
fered to approach his bedside, she look
ed upon a very different Robert Field
from the one with whom she had part
ed in such high hope the night before.
The bruises were chiefly about the
head, the physician said gravely, and
even if he recovered it waf. doubtful if
his mind would ever be sound again.
Hester heard him, and with a great sob
fell on her knees by the bedside. Where
now were the brilliant aspirations, the
tender hopes, the gay courage and stout
hearted faith of one short day gone by ?
Lost! lost! Success so near to him.
and yet to fail. Triumph so nearly
won. and vet to pass by on the other
side.
"Robert, Oh my Robert! Look up
Speak to me, or I, too, shall die!"
Ah! but love remained. love un
changed and unfaltering. This, then,
was left the blessing of a love which
believes all things, hopes all thing3, and
endures all things unto the end.
The drawn white face on the pillow
did not change at Hester's cry, but un
der the half closed lids . the dull eyes
gleamed feebly and the slender hand
outside on the coverlet groped helpless
ly. Hester took his hand in hers, and
then quick as lightning, by some
strange, subtle instinct rather than by
.any demonstration of his, she felt that
the poor stricken senses were trying to
break through the darkness that envel
oped them, and make their unknown
want understood.
"Robert, Robert! what is it?" she
cried, "what is it that you want to
make us understand.
The helpless moving of his lips, the
helpless groping of his fingers were
enough to make one weep. Hester
kept her ear to his mouth.
"What is it, Robert, dear? Tell me
what is it you want?"
The stiffened lips strove with a
mighty effort to move, and this time
one work was feebly articulated :
"Music!"
Hester looked up with a startled ex
clamation. "Music! He calls for his music! Do
you not bear? Where is it? Who
knows about it? Is it lost?" she ques
tioned eagerl'.
Again that terrible attempt at sf eeeh.
The dull eyes opened wide, the feeble
fingers clenched themselves in Hester's
hand, and with a last mad effort of ex
piring, desperate strengui, lie raisea
himself and shrieked:
"My music! Find it! Save it!" and
then he fell back on his pillow like one
dead.
"You have killed him," said the phy
sician angrily, and at the words lies
ter, with a moan, dropped down insen
sible. Xofcdead! But when after weeks
and months of painful illness, he faced
the world again, he looked like a shad
ow out of the past. But bent and aged,
with scarred forehead and whitened
locks, the wreck of his body was not
the greatest evil that had befallen him;
for of the brilliant genius of other days
not a vestige was left. Saddest of all,
the miserable ghost of his last hopes
haunted him, and in the ruined cham
ber of his darkened intellect he was
forever groping, trying to gather up
the mystic chords of tuneful thought
which no longer vibrated to his magic
touch. The lost manuscript music had
never been recovered, and though his
feeble mind failed to take in the great
ness of his loss, the shadow of some
thing beautiful which was to have
been, but, somehow failed to be, lay on
him and gave hi.s face a wistful look,
which was sadder far in its mute en
durance than any w-ail of speech could
ha
ave been.
Music was to him now something
akin to the sound of "sweet bella jan
gled, out of tune and harsh."
One day in early spring he went to
church for the first time, leaning on
Hester's arm. The old familiar look
of the place struck him forcibly and
aroused his dorment wits. He satH
down to the organ and glided his hands
over the keys; a few jangling, discor
dant chords followed, wandering and
disconnected: then his face changed,
and, with a terriable cry, he flung his
head on his arms.
"Oh, Hester! tell me what it is I
have lost! Sometimes I almost reach
it it is in my mind, something beauti
ful which I almost grasp, and then it
eludes me and fades away. I have
lost it now. Hester! Hester! take me
home.
She kissed him and soothed him
with sweet womanly words, and when
he was more composed she led him
away.
Soon after they were married. In
vain IIester,s friends threatened and
opposed her. She was quietly deter
mined. "He loved me when friends and for
tune smiled on him," she answered
them. "He would have given me ev
ery great gift which the world was
ready to bestow on him for love of his
beautiful genius, and shall I desert
him now when misfortune has overta
ken him ? Perhaps oh, perhaps some
time God may restore to him his lost
mind." Tears filled her lovely, soft,
pathetic eyes. "If I dared to hope for
it, how willingly would I give my life
to have it so."
The day before her wedding she re
ceived a visit from Conrad Charteris.
"It shall not be!" - he cried out, ve
hemently. "Do you realize what you
are doing? Why, you had better far
die at once, for Robert Field is but
little better than an idiot."
"And if he were an idiot," returned
Hester, bravely hiding her hurt at the
brutal words, "even then I would
marry him. I love him, and if not one
vestage of his glorious intellect re
mained I would be Robert Field's
wife and a proud one too."
"I believe you would V answered
Conrad, looking with a fond, n?ad long
ing into the pale face, lifted so un-
dauntedly to his dark gaze. "Hester,
you will drive mo mad. I would to
heaven that Robert Field was dead.
Why did he not die that night last
winter?" and he struck his hand fu
riously on the table in a blind frenzy
of despair.
"God knows it was from no lack of
purpose in you that he did not die," re
turned Hester, spiritedly.
She spoke at random, but Conrad
shrank away with a white face. The
idle words evidently hit him hard.
They cut close and sharp as steel iu
their unexpected descent and wheel
ing abruptly about he left her and did
not seek her again.
They were married quietly and af
ter mat, in the tender security 01 Jus
modest home, under the fond and
cherishing care of his wife, health and
strength came slowly back to the shat
tered frame of Robert Field.
Slowly, too, out of the darkness ho
began to wrench, one bv one, the se
crets of his prisoned mind. Old mel
odies began to shape themselves under
Ins touch, discordant and fragmentary
at "first, but gradually assuming symme
try and power.
Xot quite a wreck!" he would si gh,
wistfully. "Some day some good genii
will unlock my prison door and set
me free."
In the child that was born to them
a beautiful boy who sang sweet music
in every tone of his childish voice his
pride was great. He talked of him, lis
tened to him, wached him and dream-
of him, predicted a future of which
Betrand was to be the perfect flower
the very golden rose of joy. So the
five years passed and sweet Hester
Fields fair face grew heavenly beauti
ful to see, with its tired look of pa
tient waiting. God only knows how
her heart failed her now at times, or
with what fierce power she wrestled
with her growing doubts and prayed
for strength to help her bear this cross
whose shadow fell even darker and
deeper on her young life.
Had her love then bean a sacrifice in
vain? But one day the answer came!
Returning one afternoon from a long
walk Robert Field stopped in the h ill,
spell bound from the triumphant strain
of some new and beautiful melody
floating through the rooms. His
worn face flashed with the old light of
inspired thought; h'u eye3 dilated;
his whole form shook with a mysteri
ous emotion.
"What is it? what is it?" he asked
of his wife, who came to meet him.
Betrand's music!" answered proud
mother Hester. "He hasn't been with
it a long time. lie meant it to be a sur
prise for you.
Robert Field threw up his arms with
a joyful cry.
It is mine mine! My lost music!
the music I played for you that long
forgotten day ! Hark ! Hester, do you
not recognize it now? Oh! to think it
has slept so long and now come back to
me so fresh and fair. This is what I
have missed out of my life. This is
my treasure which wa3 lost to me and
now is returned to me after many
years. Brought back to me by a little
child! Our child Hester. Oh, thank
God for that.
Rushing into the parlor ha swept
Bertrand from the stool, and seating
himself at the organ, with one power
ful sweep of his hand over the keys he
summoned his God-given genius from
the tomb of his youth, and bade it
stand unresurrectionized in new life
before him. On and on the music
swept, not a note was lost; not a chord
was dropped from the splendid work.
Shouting exultantly th3 tones leaped
fourth, "and their name was called
Wonderful." On, and on! Up and
up.
At last, from shere exhaustion, the
musician dropped to the floor and ly
ing there at Hester'3 feet, lie wept
tears which were no shame to him.
"It is the very same," lie cried, "Ber
trand has written it off note for note
a counterpart of my own work. Is it
not an awful thing to think of? My
own work and yet his. Who but God
can explain it? And Oh, Hester! The
darkness is all gone now. Let us thank
God for that.
Then wrapping his arms about her,
Robert Field kissed hiswife's pale face
and kissed her tender inouth, her wavy
hair, and her slim pale faithful hands.
My wife! my wife! Oh, what if
your love had failed you, Hester? If
in those terrible first hours of my mis-1
fortune your true heart had been one
whit less true, then I should have been
lying in my grave to-day a broken and
forgotten man !"
So fame and success in the latter
days of his life came, not unwelcome,
to Robert Field. The world welcomed
his famous piece with none the less
acclaim for its long delay and for the
strange story which accompanied it.
One truth only concerning that fatal
night Robert withheld known alone
to his faithful wife. But Conrad
Charteris had long ago disappeared
from town and was seen no more
among them. So he and Hester buried
the secret in their hearts, contented
that it should be so for God ia his
own avenger.
They had been taught a wonderful
lesson, too, by one who lived on earth
knew what the full fruition of earthly
life must be, and whe gave ere He pass
ed away from among men, the crown
ing blessing of His wisdom in a last,
new commandment
Love ye one another I
TEARFUL FALL.
Frightful Frile of the man Who Know
How to lluu a p iper.
The man who knows how to run a
newspaper better than anybody else,
came in last night. His entrance was
opportudo, coming as it did, just when
the tired local was in dire distress for
want of an item something stirring
and sensati mal.you know. Fierce tho
visitor didn't break forth and dares b
thou then, etc., but he opened out with
"You fellows are just running IhU pa
per into tho ground. Why don't you
write something with vim and life in
it, and spice and ginger and all sorts
of things? Just look at that article
of yours on the "Notable Achieve
ments of the Ruahogs in tho last cen
tury! w hi ever seen' yes he said had
seen "who ever seen such morbid
dribble :u that in a respectable news
paper? If I was guilty of writing
such stuff as that I'd crawl out on a
sand bar and mourn myself to death.
Then there is that unhallowed e3say
on "The Illimitable Ethics of Uu
knownablo Convolvula;" that's a sweet
thing now ain't it? I hope to be smoth
ered in mouldy mush if that' ain't a
mighty sweet thing to print. If that
is fine writing, then hazel brush is hay.
Xow I've got an article. Whenpeoplo
read that it'il wako 'em tip. It will
make about four columns solid noupa
riel, and I want you to bring it out in
the morning. If you could only write
like that now," and he flourished hi
MS. over his head; "If you could only
write even once in a while, an articlo
that would corruscate and flash,' ho
said no more. His back was toward
the ouon window; it is about forty feet
to the ground, and tho ground,
is Oh, so hard! Impelled by
the force of circumstances and a fivo
hundred and eighty pound lick on tho
jaw, he went below, and the coroner
dragged him away this morning, but
there was no inquest. Tho cause of
his death was plain he couldn't fly,
and there was no parachute hand'. If
any other fellow thinks he knows all
about a newspaper, there's an opening
in this room. Kansas City Times.
Barmim 011 Tcmparenec.
London Times, July 17.
Mr. P. T. Barnum, the well-known
American showman, delivered an ad
dress last night on "Temperance," at
the Ilawkstone Hall, Christ Church,
Kennington Road, in connection with
the Xational Temperance League. Tho
Rev. Newman Hall presided. The lec
turer proceeded to give, as he said, "tho
experiences of hi3 life on both sides off
the hedge" in regard to temperance.
When he camo to England in 1813
with Gen. Tom Thumb he made a largo
fortune. He had been a drinker to
some little extent, but when he camo
here he took more drink, for he believ
ed that in England more stimulants
were drunk than in America, Ilo
stopped the use of the stimulants in
1817, and for twenty years he had not
had an ache or pain, though he wag
now CD. Tho statistics of America
with regard to the pauperism and
criminality proved that seven-eighths
of both were caused by the use of al
coholic drinks, so that at least thero
would be two-thirds less paupers and
criminals if this traffic did not exist.
Then, too, it had been proved that be
yond the direct and indirect evils thus
caused tho money spent in America
would every -sixteen year3 purchase
the whole of the land, so that the peo- '
plo were swallowing down tho value
of their country over and over again.
He touched upon the licensing sytem
in both countries, and urged that tho
nation had no right to licensa people
to do evil. If lie took out hi3 rattle
snakes and laid them on the pavement
so they killed a child, people would
say he had committed murder. Ho
might show his license, but that would
not save him. Yet the liquor sellers
under their licenses killed peoplo caus
ed the committal of all sorts of crimes,
and they were protected by the law.
Mr. Barnum told many anecdotes of .1
lively character drawn from American
and Irish sources, and ho added .some
remarks upon smoking habits, which
he utterly condemed. A hearty voto
of thanks was given to the lecturer.
who was warmly cheered.
Nebraska State Normal School.
The next term of this prosperous
institution will open on Tuesday, the
fourth day of September.
The two Xormal Courses are now
clearly defined, and hereafter exclusive
attention will bo given to the educa
tion and training of teachers.
At the opening of the fall term all
the students found fully quallified to"
enter the A grade will be formed into
a clas3 with a view to graduation ia
the Elementary Course at tho end of
the school-year. This class will have
a thorough drill in all the brandies of
the Elementary Course, and in tho
science and art oi teaching combin
ed with practice in the Model school.
The graduating "class in the High
er department, will pursue a similar
course in that department, whilo all
tho other classes will bej conducted as
usual.
In order to enter the regular
classes, students should be present 011
Monday, the third dav of September.
All newspapers in tho State copy
ing tills notice, will confer a favor on
all their student readers who wish to
become teachers.
a;--'.-
ii