Nebraska advertiser. (Brownville, Nemaha County, N.T. [Neb.]) 1856-1882, December 13, 1862, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    SEID TtT SATURDAY BY
rfIT. K. FISHER,
strickler's Bloci., Main Street,
P jEOWirTOLE, N. T.
;PVAS A FISHER,
I'itUl '
if r,a:.Ki ativanre, i
.jTr lf 1 , . tt! eendof months . 5 60
I' , 7-or im-rt will V furnished at $1 50 per
' IdfJtW cash accompanies the order, not
r
(fslNESS CARDS.
I 1r. GODFREY,
'trvSlCIAN, SUKGEON
LrTrTnin a ro
0 b 1 u
1 rranrp bavins: twenty-five years'
cxpe-
ca! rioiice, and one or ibc reIH)n-
1 ...nfAn
Jiuruai or vuejier:icai Bcieii'
S'1' ,,T,iitiw in Brownrille. and re-
! 1"r!.. i .,. Drofe.ional services to the cit-
t, , nlP Hispasen diseases of lous
; tfcem
tiA Tumors and Sores Ahsceie arid
. . S(ire Evei:. even partial Blindness,
called Falling Sickuess, Falsy,
i ..a i . . in firsf iml
' " i .a ..vn-f Start jltAttCAtt if
IT in HIMIC 1UI Uirt v- v
:UT t'eatioii to Apue.
"k. i r.-neMed. pive reference to iboee pro-
""''rnralie iu the United S
at all hours, ei
or at hiKflwelliuBbou
'.i'.!K,2; taMneK.
ie 1U IOC I UllfU Uu I HI " aius
either at J. II. Mann's
hoiibC, w hen not encased
n50-ly
nTUETER & H0BIS0N,
! KANi;rACTUnERS OT
liBOOTS AKD SHOES J.
tmu rik-sT ake iecoho iTa.,
J 1IROWNVILLE, 5. T.
L afT'ontlT lTirchn1 the Shoe Shop farmerly
"x Wm. T. I'". v "f ,,oW flsr ur work at rreat
d'r'uft tianufartura all that we cfler
, rJ-ATl warrantci.
r
hci l. a ' . too--
C. P. STEWART,
ELECT1C PHYSICIAN
! SURGEON,
:,ROHMlLLE, EBR.tSRA.
...ir'j J TLuraan'i DfuK Store, "Whitney's
v6-n43-:y
UrcrsTUS schoenheit,
TTORNEY AT LAW,
I AND
SOLICITORS IN CHANCERY,
I Corner Tirst and Main Streets,
cmmiUc. - - - Xcliraslia
DWARD W. THOMAS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
IICETOR IN CHANCERY.
AKD
i CIc-e' corner cf Kain and First Streets.
:rownville, Nebraska.
THOMAS DAVIS,
LECT1CPHYSICIAN
j SURGEON,
WLE HOCK, NEBRASKA
JXVrencc, Dr. I). iwin, Iirownville.
? -.1 1 1, VI. n4fl-Iy
LEWIS WALDTER,
:jise, sigx a.d ornamental
lAlZER AND PAPEB HANGER.
I UKOWXVILLE. N. T
t
j E. LIOODY & SON,
1AGARY NURSERIES,
I LOCK POUT, N.
Ttolesoie and Betail DcaleiB in Fruit,
kit and Ornamental Trees,
i j j AKD SUEDES AND
' 1T0CK FOR XIRSLROCX.
m WATCHES, JEVELRY.
i i
M J
PI ov.Mann
uti'i vKiin'y
SCHUTZ
nounieto thecitiiens of Brownville
that he has located himself in
i'lo xnilintendii keeninc a full assort.
(j : fvervitiiig in hi lineof lUMuets, which will
I : -w f.,"- ca-h. He will also do all kinds of re-
r 1 livfclmki. m nictieaudjewelry. All work war-
.. v3ulSly
l Jot Sale at Bargains.
X". 1 Slnittle F.mpirr Sewiug Machines.
f'at.kiin Family Sewinc Machine.
H'Tioe Wif rv' $76 Melodious.
I'ecnV Conical Washing MaohiBes.
S... i f. w. Gaten &. Co.'s Sugar Cane Milli.
'fr.
? 1 : the Advertuer and Te.rmr Office, Browi
I ..Vtiraska.
Ulll lil
0
A. COXSTAltlaE,
f 1MPOSTER AKD DEALER IW
ON, STEEL, NAILS,
rTINGS, SPRINGS, AXLES, FILES
BEIjTjO ws,
a Kti
rer
UCKSMITirS TOOLS
Hubs, Spokes and Bent Stuff.
I ?Ur! Street, between Felix and Edmond,
,IXT JOSEPH. MO.
he sell at-St. lxuis pricesfor cash,
ghest Price Paid for Scrap Iron.
r 1, 159. ly.
REVL ESTATE
AKD
ill cctio q Office
o r
. UWNVILLE, NEBRASKA.
in. Liurcn Lcvte and First Streets.
,'cula.r attrntlon.lTcn to the
pur, liiase and Sale of Ileal
IMate. 51akin? Col
' lections and
Ricnt or Taxes lor Xon-Rcsi-dents.
-M) W ARRANTS I OR SALE, for cash and on
WARRANTS IAICATED forEastern Cap
j 4-t lanl selected from perional examination,
"Oj-Iete Township ilap, showing Streams,
l'n forwarded with the Certificate of loca-
;'ille.X.T. Jan.S.lSCl.
f 0 Western Farmers.
i
zvooo
i ' Teral Tarictirs of Tobacco that will ripen
S -, lautu Je. To any one who wishes seed,
. 'lt.,Ie three--ent Postage stami, c n the
etliV fc 1! of each variety of seed
I X,e -nt in the months of Repiembcr
-i irTi ! ia to introduce the cultura cf
. JutUV-wU
c R. O. THOMPSON,
1 TrarTi tit.. r,..,,. vi.. t-.
cX
tit1-
A.V..fr?T, in','souri. Iowa. Kansa and e-
winlStiln the once, and eending a Ko.
i'flr,v twcnty fonr papers
papers choice flow-THOiflJf.
v n r i A 7T! m A
vol. vir.
JOHIT L CARSOIT
(Successor to Lnshhangn & Carson,
sr rxi
LAND AND TAX PAYIIIG
Dealer in Coin, Uncurrent .Voney, emi
Warrants,' Exchange, and Gold Dust
MAIN STREET.
BROTTXriLIaE, XECRASILA.
I will give especial attention to buying and aellinjr ex
change on the principal citiei of the United States and
Europe, Gold Silver, nncurrent Bank Billt, and
Gold Dust, Collections made on all accessible point,
and prceetl remitted in exchange at current rale.
Deposits received on current account, and interest al
lowed on special depot) ta.
OFFICE,
STHEET, BETHTX:. THE
TelegTapU and the U. S.
Land Otliccs.
REFERENCES:
Lind & Brother Philadelphia, Pa.
J. "W. Carson ti Co., "
Hiaer. Dirk &. Co. Baltimore, Md.
Tount t. Carson, ' "
Jeo. Tnunjpson Mason, Col'r of Port, ' '
wm. T. Smithson, Efcq., Hanker, tTashinetop D.C.
Z. T. Stevens, Esq., Att'y at Law,
Jno. S. Gallaher, Late 3d Aud. C. S.T
Tarlor &. Enesh, Bankers,
AlcClelland, Pye k. co.,
H.in. Thomas G. Pratt,
Hon. Ja. O. Carson.
P. B. Smali. Esq., Pres't S. Bank,
Tol. Geo. Schley, A'y at Law,
Col. Sam.LUmuletouAtt'y at Law,
Jnde Tbs, Perry,
Prof. U. Tatwiler,
4
Chicago, HI.
St. Loins, ifo.
Annaptlis, ltd.
MBcert,burt Pa
Hasertown, Md.
Easton, Md.
Cumberland, Md
Havana, A 1 alma.
Kor 8, lS6d-tf.
BROWNVILLE
TK0R1J, COLMAH, CO.,
Announce to the traveling public that their splendid
and commodious Steam Perry runDins across from
Brownville, pT!lN Nebraska.
is one of the lest In every Tefpect on the Urper Mis
souri river. The Boat makes recular trips every hour
so that no time will be lost in wail ins.
Tsie banks on both sides of the river are low and well
prated which renders unloading unneceesary as is the
case at most other ferries.
No fears need be entertained as to difficulties at ornear
thu. crossing, as everybody in this region, on l oth sides
of the river, is for tne Uniou the stroncci kind.
Our chrpes to an item these hard limes .ire lower
than at any other crossinc.
Travelers from Kansas to Iowa and to the east will find
this tha r.earest and best route i" every respect.
THORN. COLEMAN & CO.
Brownville, Nebraska, Sept. 21st, 1661.
LANDRETH'S
Warranted Garden Seeds
CLUNDEN, KOENIG & CO.,
(Late John Gaenett & Co.,)
Ko. 66 North Second Street, above Fire,
ST. IiOTJIS, MO.
Offer for sale at very low fi?ures. a large and wel
assorted stock of Agricultural and Horticultural Imple
ments, comprising everyihin? necessary to the Farmer,
together with a large and fresh supply of
lanflretli's Celebrated Garden Seels,
CROP OF 1S61,
For which they are the sole agjnts. Their friends can
rely nion petting from them heeds that are not only
pure but true to nnie ir. every instance. -Alsofleid
eeds at lowest market rates Chinese Sugar Care seed,
Tobacco seed. Top Onions. Kc,, 4tc. Dealers in seeds
would do well to send tliem their orders.
Send for Almanac and Illustrated Cataiigne gratis.
BLUNDEN, K.OEN1G A. CO.
March 6, 1862. r.35-ly
J. WILSON BOLLINGER,
"3? "X" O 2r. IT JEZm
AND
COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Conrral and CoIIectin?: A?:ent.
BEATRICE, GAGE CO., NEBRASKA.
WILL pxaciea in the seve:al Courts in uage anu
adjoining counties, and will give prompt attention
to al! business entrusted to him. Ooiiections prompt
ly niiide. articular attention given to locat
ing Land Warrants on lands carefully selected bj
hitustlf.:
Septeuiucr 25, 'CI. n!2-yly
JACOB HARHON,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
BROWNVILLE,
Calls the attention cf Gentlemen desiring new, neat.
tervicable aud fashionable
WEARING APPAREL,
TO HIS
Hew Stock of Goods
JUST RECEIVED,
BROAD CLOTHS, CASSIMERS, VESTINCS, &c..Ac.r
OF THE VERY LATETT STYLES,
Which he will sell or make up, to order, at unprece
dented low prices.
Those wihhiug any thing in his line will do well to
call and examine hU siock beiore investing, as he
pledges hiuielf to hold out peculiarly favorable in
ducements. February 13th, 1SG2.
THE CONFESSIONS AND EXPERI
ENCE OF A SUFFERER.
TuWished as a warning, and for the e j-edal bene
fit oi Young Men and those who suffer with Nervous
Debility. Loss of Memory, Premature Desir, Ac .ic,
bv one of those who has cured himse'.f ly simple
means, after being put to great expense and incon
venience, through the use of worthless medicines
prescribed by learned Doctors.
Single copies may be bad of the author, C. A.
LAM BERT, Esq., Ureenpoint, Long Island,by enclos
ing a roist-naid addressed envelope. Address
CHARLES A. LAMRERT, Esq., Ureeipoint, Lor
Island, N. T.
May 22, 1S62. n4S-2m.
TVIon-oyLcivaxicocl on.
PIKES' PEAK GOLD!
I will receive Pike'a Peak Gold, and advance
money upon the same, and pay over balar.ee of proceeds
as tioonas Mint returns are had. In all cases, 1 wi
exhibit the printed returns of the United Slates Min
or Asoay ofnee.
JNO. L . CARSON,
BULLION AND EXCHANGE BROKER
BROWNVILLE, JTEBRASKA.
TOvi
Hats, Boots and Shoes.
I have just received a New Supply ft Hats, Boots an
Shoes, which I will sell cheaper than they were ever
offered here before. Call and see me.
DATID SIEGEL.
Brow-Bville, ArTil 1852 nto-tt.
Seeds Prepaid by IaiL
55 Prettiest Annuals In Ccltivation, - - $100
25 Choice Vegetable Seeds lor the Garden, - 1 OO
Both to Club of Tive for $3; To Clubs of Ten for $16;
To Clnbs of Twenty for $25. r
The NEW JAPAN MI LI ET, with imms-nyHheads,
six to ten inches long, 25 cents per lame parer; Five
for $1. I received Genuiue Seeds of this aew and valu
able Millet direct from Japan, bv the Niagara, last May,
and can confidently recommend it as the best Millet ta
cultivation. M- WATSON,
nas-tf Old Ooleay JTurveriM, Plyraoi;,
sy . xyxifv' v U' vyy
' LIBERTY AKD
BROWN VILLE, NEBRASKA, SATURDAY,
mw gllitetistmtnts.
FROM C. H. SC RIVEN,
CEXKIlAli ADVERTISING AGENCY,
10. G3 DEAKBOBIT STHEET,
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.
FAIRBANKS'
ETAXDAUD
SCALES
- OF ALL KIKD8.
J Also, "Warehouse TruckB, Letto:r
3 Presses, Ac
FAIRBANKS, GREEMLEAF & CO,
!
1T2 LAKE ST;, CHICAGO,
t3"Be careful, and bny only the euuine.J
June I2.h, 1SU n49-3ra
16G2. FALL TRADE. 1862
WEBER, WILLIAMS & YALE,
jobbess or
HATS, CAPS,
FURS, BUFFALO ROBES,
BUCKSKIN GOODS, &c,
25, LAKE STREET, CHICAGO, ILL.
Vfe harci now m Store for Fall Trade th Largest and
best Assorted Stock in our line ever exhibited in this
Market, espeaily adapted to ifce wants of Dealera
from all sections of the Northwest, and unsurpassed in
variety and cheapness by any to be found WEST or
EAST.
Me "chants -who tare heretofore purchased in othor
Markets are especially invited -to examine our sto k
this teason, and a re assured we are fully prepared and
determined to tell (Joods as cheap, and on as fvorabe
terms as the best cla of Houses in any Market.
Ol-DEES WILL RECEIVE PROMPT PERSONAL
ATTENTION.
CASH PAID FOR RAW FURS,
and Price List f urrJshed hy mail.
WEBER, WILLIAMS & TALI.
Oct. 4 'S3. nl2-3m
FEl SIIIXG, X. Y.,
Will serd to applicants wio enclose stamps, th'tir
Neif Catalogue of Small Fruits, including 200 SelKt
Varieties of Strawberries. Also Cata.ogue of Bulbi us
Plot-era and Psfonies, Fruit and oniamental Tre;,
Eos and Flowering Pianta, Seeds, nlt)-iw
Shingles! Shingles!!
I would re-pcttully inforri the cltiens of Nemnha
osui.ty, thtt I shll endeavor to keep this market sup
plied with gooil Cottonwood Shingles, which I will i el
fortash: cr take in exchange Cattle, Hogs, Wheat or
Con. H. P. BARUEI.
March 27, 1SC2. u38-tf 4
Okra or Gumbo Seed.
The best substitute for Coffee prepared in the same
ifis-mer as CorTee. Packages of seed by mail at lOcts.
each. Each package contains seed euoqga to raue a
tpyIy for an ordinary faiaiiy.
Send order! to ' H. A. TERRT.
iiM-U Creent City, Iown.
THE M1SS0URIREPUBL!CAN.
TcMls-hcd Daily, Tri-Weeklj" and Weekly,
GEORGE KNAPP,)
K. PASCUALL, V rroprletort.
JOILX KXAPP, )
OITFTCF, "NO, 11 CHESTNUT STHEET.
TERMS OF THE RERUEL1CAX.
Dr.i!y, (in advance) $10 00
Tri-weekly, (in advance"! 6 00
Studay Republican 2 00
Weekly, in advance 2 00
To Clu'bsof Ave Tri-weeklies 20 00
Three copies Weekly one year 6 00
Fi?e ' u u u 8 0
Tn u tt a 15 00
Fourteen " " " 20 00
Twenty " 27 .,0
Thirty u " u 40 00
Fortj " " 50 00
CASH RATES FOR ADVERTISING.
jgyWants, Lost and Found, Boarding, For Rent,
and Removals, will be caarge 1 filty cenu per square
of eight lines or le?s fer first insertiou. aDd twenty
five cent? foroarh additional one, without alteration.
O.'xE iUUARE, eight lines or less $ 50
3 times on first or fourtn page 1 0!)
u
u
u
tt
M
(
u
u
it
u
tt
u
II
tt
.
I
1 week
u
2 weeks,
II
U
It
U
u
u
u
tt
tt
3 weeks,
1 month,
2 months
3 months,
8 00
... 10 00
6 months, "
12 months,"
" 15 00
" 25 00
I3f XVwearly Contracts male by which ad rerti-
srs can have the privilege of changing mailer or
style of card without additional charge.
't57AU advertisements required to be kept on
second page, charged ae new each day, and on third
pige. an aaviince over stated rates.
5f"Advertisements directed to be displayed, or
set in larsre ti re, charged doublerat.es.
r"Advertisement in WEEKLY paper, ten cents
a line solid, or fcr'teen cents, leaded agate typi, each
insertion
Scf Transient adrertisementa must be paid for in
advance.
PROSPECTUS FOR 1363.
TIIE SATURDAY EVENING POST.
-
The publishers of- THE POST take pleasnre in an
nouncing that their Literary arrangements ror ttie cm
ing year are of a character to warraut them in promis
ing a feat of good tbius to their thousands of readers
Amoim the cuntribntor. to THE POST we may now
mention the Jollowin distineui-hed authors :
MRS. ELLES WOOD.
Author of "The Ecrt't Heirs " ' Eatt Lynne,"
'The Channrna." 4"C .
.V A R I A .V H A R L A JV D .
Author of "Alone " Hdde Path " -Miriam," fc
EDMUND KIRK.
Author of 'Aonit Pi'c."
virgiS'IA f roTr.vsr.VD
XThote Domtttic Sketches are to gr tally admired.
Dnrin? the crming year The Post will endeavor to
Its high refutation for ceojcx ioi., hm.b,
.n,t r.-ritv SDecial Hopartmetits shall als- be de
voted a heretofore to Agriculture, Wit and Humor,
Receipts, JS'ew t, Market, rc
TERMS CAS Q IN ADVANCE
1 copy, cue year,
2 copies, one year, - " " "
4 copies, one year,
8 copies, one yenr, (and oae to the etter-np
uf the club.) "
20 copies, one yeaj, (and one to the getter-p
of the club,) -
$ 5 00
3 eo
6.00
12.00
25.00
A SPLENDID PREMIUM.
WHO WANTS A SEWING KACHIKE ?
To advene sending thirty subscription anio. we
will rive one of Wbt elet tt WUsou's celcbraiel Sett
ino Machines, such as taey sell for S45. The machine
"m k. .,,.ti t th manufactory in New York, boxed
and f.imtfcrded free of cost, triA the exception cJA
riddVi DEACON & FETE I? SON,
So. 319 Waiuut Street, JJLUade,j,hta.
Flower. Seeds.
Choice varieties, and of Tery superior 4nalitr,20 pa
pora of which will be Bent (post-paid) by mail, to aay
address, for one dollar.
H. A.TE2KT, Cretcant City. Iowa.
Maraa 13th, IWt . tnJft-Tm
1
mr
UNION, ONE AND HTSEPEKABLS, NOW
Herdlns Cattle.-
Extract fr on a Private Letter.
Within a few vears a system of
cattle-growing has been practiced in
this country (111.) which changes the
characteristics of prairie farming.
The vacant lands are now bo general
ly enelosed that the pasture "range"
has become too narrow for the stock
of the farmer, and this has led the
owners of larce herds to establish
"ranchos" or herding stations, on the
borders of Inlet and Winnebago mar
shes, to which aro gathered in the
spring most of- the beef- and young
cattle of this section for pasturage
during the grazing season. In Octo
ber they are returned to their owners
who pay about one dollar per head,
for salting and attendance, thus get
ting a summer's growth at but slight
expense compared with home feed
ing, the animals thriving equally well.
The farmers following this sysiem,
are generally such as own from one
hundred to one hundred and sixty
acres of land, about one half being
kept under cultivation, in corn, wheat,
timothy, and the lesser crops.
e cannot give a better idea of
this system than by-some accouut of
the farm and management of Ira Bv
rcn, Esq. He has 240 acres of land,
nearly one third of which is in with
timothy, which he cuts as early as
it is fit for seed, carrfully saving the ,
straw, as well as that of his .larger
crops of wheat and oats in stacks for
winter forajre. His cornfield also1
furnishes a large amount of fodder.
He buys of his neighbors as he can,
their one, two and three year olds,
as before stated. In October, when
the prairie grass is all dead, his tis
mothy is excellent pasture, and here
his stock is kept until snow comes,
when they range the cornfields or feed
at the straw stacks as taey choose.
At the proper age, Mr. Brewer fat
tens his cattle for the Chicago mar
ket, feeding them liberally with corn
in the ear. About sixtv hos follow
the cattle to use up all the shelled
corn and that which is voided whole.
It is found that hogs do better when
fed in this way than if fed corn in the
ear fattening more readily and eco
nomically. !This system has its advantages in
allowing the profitable home consump
tion of all the fodder as well as the
coarse grains of the farm ; in ena
bling the farmer to keep all the stock
the farm will winter at but slight ex
pense per head ; and in the large a-
mount oi manure tnus iurnisnea ior
keeping the .soil in highly productive
state, lhe expense ot marketing tne
product is far less than in the form of
grain, and the prices are generally as
remunerative.
To Prepare Trees forPlantln
With a sharp knife cut off sloping
from the under side, any bruised or
broken roots, then reduce the tops to
correspond with the losis of roots, cut
ting off the surplus branches, and
reducing those forming the head to
three or four buds cm each of last
year's shoots. This will cause a more
r . - -i l A xv r i.
healthy anci vigorous kuooi me urbi
season its omission is a common
cause of the failure or sickly growth
of newly planted trees.
In setting, let one person hold the
tree in its position, while another fills
in the mellow earth, pressing it care
fully among the roots with the hand,
leaving no cavities underneath and
when the roots are all covered, pres
sing the whole down firmly with the
foot.
Avoid deep planting when all is
finished, the tree should be not over
two inches deeper than when in the
nursery.
Grapevines should be cut back to
two or three eyes, and only one of
these should be permitted to grow the
first year.
Blackberries and raspberries should
be cut back to within one foot of the
norund.
Gooseberries and currants should
he cut back to one or two eyes oflast
season's growth.
Trees planted in the Fall should
have earth hilled up around the stem,
six inches or mo;e in light, to hold
them firmly in position during win
ter, and protect th3 roots somewhat
from frost and excess of wet. This
is also a protection against injury by
mice. In sprirg the earth should be
leveled, and a few inches of coarse ma
nure or litter spread on the surface
over the roots for the space of four or
five feet in diameter; this will keep
the surface moist, prevent baking,
and check the growth of weeds.
If planting is done rather late in
spring, and in dry weather, it is well
to give water freely after setting the
trees and covering the roots with earth
letting it settle before finishing up ;
then if the surface is mulched as re
commended, no farther watering is
necessary.
No gras3 or grain crops should be
grown araoBg fruit trees, at least un
til they have arrived at bearing Bize,
even then it is bad economy.
tc
y- Arir
AETTTOKETE:
DECEMBER 13, 1S62.
THE PRESIDENTS MESSAGE.
Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh
Congresf, December 1st, 1SC2.
FeUoiD Citizens of the Senate and
House of Representatives : j
Since vour last assembling another
year of health and bountiful harvest has
passed, and while it has not pleased the
Almighty to bless us with a return of
peace, we cannot but press on, guarded
by the best light he gives us, trusting
that in His own good time and wise way,
all will be well.
OUR 'FOREIGN RELATI05S.
The correspondence touching foreign
affairs which has taken place during the
last year, is herewith submitted, in vir
tual compliance with a request to that
effect, made by the House of Representa
tive near the close of the past session of
Congress. If the condition of our rela
tions with other nations is less gratifying
than it has usually been at other periods
it has certainly been more satisfactory
than a nation so unhappily distracted as
we are, might have reasonably appre
hended. In the month of June last there were
some grounds to exnect that the maratime
O A.
powers which, at the beginning of our
domestic difficulties so unwisely and so
unsuccessfully as we think, recognized
the insurgents as a beligerent power,
would soon recede from that position
which has proved only less injurious to
themselves than to our own country, but
the temporary reverses which afterwards
befel the national arms and which were
exaggerated by our own disloyal citizens
abroad, have hitherto delayed that act of
simple injustice.
The civil war which has so radically
changed for the moment the occupations
and habits of the American people, has
necessarily disturbed the social condition
and affected very deeply the prosperity
of the rations with which we have car
ried on a commerce that has been stead
ily increasing throughout the period of
half a century. It has at the same time
excited political ambitions and apprehen
sions, wrhich have produced a profound
agitation throughout the civilized world.
In this unusual agitation we have for
borne taking part in any controversy be
tween parties and factions in any such
Stales. We have attempted no prcpa
gandism and acknowledged norevelution,
but we have left to every nation the ex
clusive conduct and management of its
own anairs. uur struggle has been or
course contemplated by foieign nations
with reference less to its own merits than
to its supposed and often exaggerated
effects and the consequences resulting to
those nations themselves. Nevertheless,
complaint on the part of this Government,
even if if it were just, would certainly be
unwise.
SUPPRESSION CF THE SLAVE TRADE.
The treaty with Great Britain for the
suppression of the slave trade has been
put into operation with a good prospect of
complete success. It is an occasion of
especial pleasure to acknowledge that the
execution of it on the part of Her Ma
jesty's government has been marked with
a jealous respect for the authorities of the
United States, and the rights of their
moral and loyal citizens.
The convention with Hanover for the
abolition of the State dues has been car
ried into full effect, under the act of
Congress for that purposn.
THE COAST BLOCKADE.
A blockade of 3,000 miles of seacoast
could not be established and vigorously
enforced in a season of great commercial
activity like the present without commit
fing occasional mistakes, and inflicting
unintentional injurie upon foreign na
tions and their subjects. A civil war,
occurring in a country where foreigners
reside and carry on a trade under treaty
stipulations, is necessarily fruitful of
complaints .of the violations of neutral
rights. All such collissions tend to ex
cite misapprehensions and possibly to pro
duce national reclamations between na
tions which have a common interest in
preserving peace and friendship.
In clear cases of these kinds I have,
so far as possible, heard and redressed
complaints which have been preferred by
friendly powers. There is, however, a
large and augmenting number of doubt
ful cases upon which the government is
unable to agree with the government
whose protection is demanded by the
claimants, lhere are, moreover, many
cases in which the United States or their
citizen suffer wrongs from naval or mil
itary authorities of foreign nations, which
the government of these States are not
prepared to redress.
AN INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION.
I have proposed to some of the foreign
C...- .1 - . .J l 1.
oiaitrs uius imi.'rcMcu uium;u couverjuons
to examine and adjust such complaints.
This propositihn has been made especially
to Great Britain, to France, to Spain
and to Prussia. In each case i: has been
kindly received, but has not yet "been
formally adopted.
THE CASE OF A NORWEGIAN BARK.
I deem it my duty to recommend an
appropriation in behalf of the owners of
the Norwegian bark, Admira P. Fcrciens
Riola, which vessel was in May, 1SG1,
prevented by the commander of the block
ading force off Charleston from leaving
that port with a cargo, notwithstanding a
similar privilege had shortly before teen
granted to an English vessel. I have di
rected the Secretary of State to cause the
papers in the case to be communicated to
the proper committee.
AFRICAN EMIGRATION.
Applications have been made to me by
many free Americans of African descent
to favor their emigration, with a vieiv to
such colonization as was contemplated in
recent acts of Congress. Other parties,
at home and abroad, some from intereste d
motives, others from patriotic principles,
UZ Hy
PA
NO. 22.
and still others influenced by philanthrop-
ic Fentiments, have surested similar
measures; while on the other hand sev
eral of the Spanish Amerioan Republics
have protested against the sending of
such colonies to their respective territo
ries. Under these circumstances I have de
clined to move any such colony to any
State without first obtaining the consent
of its Government, with an agreement on
its part to receive and protect such emi
grants in all their rights asfreeaen, and
I have, at the same time, offered to the
several States situated in the tropics, or
having colonies there to negctisite with
them, subject to the advise and consent
of the Senate, to favor voluntary emigra
tion of portions of that class to their re
spective Territories, upon conJitions
which shall be equal, just and humane.
Liberia and Hayti are the only coun
tries to which colonists of African de
scent from here could go with a certain
ty of being received and adopted as citi
zens, and 1 regret to say that such per
sons, contemplating colonization, do not
seem so willing to emigrate to these
countries as to some others, nor so willing
as I think their interest demands. I
believe, however, that the opinion is im
proving, and that ere long there will be
an augmented and considerable emigra
tion to both these countries from the
United States.
OUR FOREIGN RELATIONS.
The new commercial treaty between
the United States and the Sultan of Tur
key has been carried into execution. A
commercial and consular treaty has been
negotialed, subject to the Senate's con
sent, with Liberia, and a similar negoti
ation is now pending with the Republic
of Hayti. A considerable improvement
cf the national commerce is expected to
result from these measures. Our rela
tions with Great Britain, France, Spain,
Portugal, Russia, Prussia, Denmark,
Sweeden and Austria, the Netherlands,
Italy, Rome, and the other European
States, remain undisturbed. Very fa
vorable relations also continue to be
maintained with Turkey. Morocco, China
and Japan.
OUR NEIGHBORING NATIONS.
During the last year there has not
only been no change of our previous re
lations with the Independent btates of our
continent, but mere friendly sentiments
than have been heretofore existing are
believed to be entertained by those
neighbors whose safety aud progress are
so intimately connected with our own.
This statement especially applies to Mex
ico, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras,
Teru and Chili. The commission under
the convention with the republic cf New
Grenada closed its session without hav
ing audited and passed upon all the
chirns which were submitted to it. A
proposition is pending to revive the con
vention that it may be able to do more
complete justice. The commission be
tween the United States and the repub
lic of Costa Rica has completed its labors
and submitted its reports.
INTERNATIONAL TELEGRAPH.
I have favofed the project of connect
ing the United Slates with Europe by an
Atlantic telegraph, and a similar project
to extend the telegraph from San Fran
cisco to connect by a Pacific telegraph
with the wire that is being extended
across the Russian empire.
OUR TERRITORIES.
The Territories of the United Stales,
with unimnortant exceptions, have re-
A
maineu unuisiurueu uy iuc uvn wai, u
they are exhibiting such eviJence of j
pro.per.ty as justifies an expectation that
some ot tnem win soon De in a conuuiuu
to be organized as States and be consti
tutionally admitted into the Federal
Union
The immense mineral resources of
some of these Territories ought to be
developed as rapidly as possible. Every
step in that direction would have a ten
dency to improve the revenues of the
Government and diminish the burdens of
thepeople.
A SCIENTIFIC EXPLORATION.
It is worthy of your serious consider
tion whether some extraordinary meas
ures to promote that end cannot be ad
opted. The measure which suggests
itself as most likely to be effective is a
scientific exploration of the mineral re
gions in those Territories, with a view to
the publication of its results at home and
in foreign countries results which can
not fail to be auspiciou3.
NATIONAL FINANCES.
The condition of the finances will
claim your m st diligent consideration.
The vast expenditures incidental to the
military and naval operations required
for the suppression of the rebellion have
hitherto been met with a promptitude and
certainty usual in similar circ im'tances,
and the public credit ha- been fully
maintained.
THE CURRENCY INFLATION.
The continuance of the war, however,
and the increased disbursfment3 made
necessary by the augmented forces now
in the field, demand your best reflection
as to the test mode of providing the
necessary revenue without injury to busi
ness, and with the least possible burdens
upon labor. The suspension of specie
payment by the tanks, soon aftnr the
commencement of your last session, made
large issues of United States note una
voidable
In no other way could the
payment of the troops and other just de -
rounds be so economically or as well pro -
vided for. The judicious legislation of
Congress securing the recsivability of
these notes for leans and internal cuties,
and making them a legal tender for oth
er debts, has made them universal cur
rency, and has satisfird, parti lily at least,
and for the time, the long -felt want of a
uniform circulating medium, saving there
by to the people immense sums in dis-
Nebraska uutrftscr.-
One .-jT7are (" en linns or le) oat insertion, $1 ro
V..cix adlitioijal insertion - - - t
husmf s Cants., iz hues cr lew, one yew f to
Ouo oulunin neyear - - - - . 6 !
One half culunn vne year - - - 43 tu
Oaf f onTth co r mn .yer - - Si i
One e!Chth- :jHiD i,re year - 18
Guecoiemn n x nna:a . . i 4
ha'.f column six ?!;octi - "-iti
One f-j-jrth cvinam mx t;w&:i, - . t t
(s; e:.:L-ii :.' a co.un.n fu mria li r i
Ore column taree rauiitns - . , t,
One half alosn three month. . li
One f.iirth wloniD three months - 12 a
OneeuMh n lnmi lhre montjs - s in
AuuouiicuizCioduUteri for OSUe, - , its
Transient advertisements mantfre paid for iu adv&bca.
Tear It advertisements, quarterly tnadvaac,.
In TranLiea; Advertisement, fmiu erer
s.yj.re will be charted fur by the. line, atttu rate of lea
, entsth. first wat-k, awl 5 cent Mca aule.iuout weefc.
count and exchange. A return to spcia
payments, however, at the earliest perio
compatible, with a due regard to ail in
terests, should be kept in view.
EVILS OF FLUCTUATION.
Fluctuations in the taiue of currency
are always injurious, and to reduce these
fluctuations to the "lowest possible point,
will always be a leading purpose in wise
legislation. Prompt and certain conver
tibility into coin is generally acknowl
edged to be the lest and surest against
them, and it is extremely doubtful wheth
er a circulation of United Slates notes,
payable in coin, and sulliciently large fcr
the wants of the people, can be perma
nently, usefully and safely maintained.
Is there any other medium which the
necessary provision for the public-wants'
can be made, and the great advantages
cf a safe and uniform currency secured ?
A REMEDY PROPOSED.
I know of none which promises so cer
tain results, and at the same t;me so un
objectionable as the organization of bank
ing associations under a general act cf
Congress, well guarded in its provisions.
To such associations the Government
might furnish circulating notes on the"
security of United States bonds deposited
in the Treasury. These notes, prepared1
under the supervision of proper ofBcers,
and being uniform in appearance ard
security, and convertable always with
coin, woull at once protect later against
the evils of a vicious currency, and facil
itate commerce by cheap and safe ex
changes. A moderate reservation from
the interest on these bends would com
pensate the United States for the prepa
ration and distribution of the notes, and
a general supervision of the system would
lighten the burden of that part of ths
public debt employed as security. The
public credit, moreover, would be greatly
improved, and the negotiation of new
loans greatly facilitatsd by the steady
market demand for Government bond,
which the adoption of the proposed sys
tem would create. It is an additional
recommendation of the measure, of con
siderable weight in my judgment, that it
would reconcile, a3 far as possible, all ex
isting interests by the opportunity offered
to existing institutions for a secured uni
form nationalcirculation in place of the
local and various circulation, secured and
unsecured, now issued bv them.
THE TREASURY EXHIBIT.
The receipts into the Treasury from
all bureaus, including loans and balances'
from the proceeding year, for the fiscal
year ending on COih of June, 1SG2, were :
RiCEir-n. -
Cu-ioni
Ilireet Tax-
Public Laodi--
Miscellaneous
Loans in all form?..
L'idiaace from last year
$13,053,137 82
l,7iJj?.l 73
U22)Z 77.
K3I.7S9 61
5:5,692.30 50
257,065 50
Total 5S3,SS5,217 65
The disbursements during the same
period were :
DISBURSEMENTS.
For Conrossianal, executive an j ja-
diciai purposed $5,929,f)08 23
For foreign intercourse 1,23'J,719 35
For mirfoellaneoui expense, iiclud-
inz the uniit., loans, postoXce de-
fijienc:ej, collectiou of rerenue,
and oth.r charges. 14,1C3,771 5
For expenses unaer tte Interiar De-
pa-tmunt 3.102.995 52
Under the War Department 381tS,li)7 Z&
Under the Xavj Department 4274.53 R'i
For interest on the public dbt 13,rJ0,32i 45
For the pajmen:of the pulll) debt,
including reimburn:nienU if tem-
p-jrary loan and redemption 9!i,0C'u,023 0 9
Total - 5,81100 25
Balance in the treasury on the 1st
dy of July, 1SJ2 13,013,446 81
It s-houtu be observee that the sum of
-or fl0(. 0o,. no j , , , -
n, and redempiion of the public
deU L - indudeJ .q ihello
made, may properly be deducted both
from the receipts and expenditures, leav
ing the actual receipts for the year
S4S7,7SS .321 97, and the expenditures
S474,744,7b3 16. 0:her information on .
the subject of the finances will be given
in the report of the Secretary of the
Treasury, to whose statements and views
I invite your most candidate and consid
erate attentioa.
WAR AND NAVY REPORTS.
The reports of the Secretaries of the
Navy and War are herewith transmitted.
These reports, though lengthy, are
scarcly more than brief extracts of the
very numerous and extensive transactions
and operations conduced through these
Departments, nor could I give a summa
ry of them here upon any principle whieh
would admit of its being much shorter
than the reports themselves.
I therefore content myself with lay
ing the reports before you, and asking
your attention to them.
THE POST OFFICE T APARTMENT.
It gives me pleasure to report a deci
ded improvement in the financial condi
tion of the Post Oilice Department, as
compared with the several preceeding
years. The receipts for the fiscal year,
16G1, amounted to $5,349,200 40, waich
embraced the revenue from all the States
of the Union for three-quarters of that
year. Notwithstanding the cessation cf
revenue from the iiO-called Confederate
States, during the list fiscal y:ar the in
crease of the correspondence of the loyal
States has been sufficient to produce a
revenue during the same yesr of $3,299,
520 90, being only $50,000 less than was
derived from all tte States cf the Union
the previous year.
The expenditures show a still mere fa
vorable result. The amount expended ia
1561 was S12.606.7S3 11. For the last
jyear lhe amount his teen reduced to
' Sll, 125,364 13, showing a difference of
: about 81,457,000 in the expenditures, as
compared with the preceding year, or
about 2.750.000, as compared with the
fiscal year of 1560.
The deficiency in the Department fcr
the previous year was S-i,55i,CC .j D3.
For the last fiscal year it was reduced to
82,112,514 57. These favorable rsrolts
are, in fact, owtng to the cessajiaa cf