Nebraska advertiser. (Brownville, Nemaha County, N.T. [Neb.]) 1856-1882, July 18, 1861, Image 1

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THE ADVERTISER,1
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one Column one year, - -- -- -- -
Oao-hdlf Coliirnn ae ycr, ------
Quo fourth Cui sm:i uae year, - - -
Uaeeitiia Colusa ono year, - - - - .--
Onejo! iitnnsls muntb, - - - - ' - - -
One half Column Jix months, , - - -One
fourth Column ilx month-, - - - - -
Ose olat'iih Coiucia sis zncnt&t, - - -'
One C' ItJtnn taree trnti.
One hair Col nam three xnoctS, - - - -
Onefocrth Cilatun ttreerjoutt, - - - -
OaeoUnin Column ;ree niontb. - - - -
.aiisaciag caaliJitesf oroce (in auTjcce,)
"LIBERTY AND TTHTOrT. ONE AND HTSEPHHABLI?. NOW AND FOREVER.1'
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VOL. VI.
BROWNVILLE, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1861.
NO. 2.
' '' 1 N s 8 JJ-LBit-
'HnKm fc Scliociiluit
iTTOiUraYS AT LAW,
onnToraSA in chancery,.
S Carn P,r.t and Ua,
lrtvn'tli, "
TDlZD. GWIN,
,,.:,, rrmancnily located in
vvmVNVlLU; NEIUIASKA,
, li.'c of Medicine and Snrgery, ten-
Y"'ihCi;: ,vh;cs to the afflicted
T TiioltibAr, jl d.
,rditl , -t te,.-,,,, ,0 ..pr.Mon.to receive
..: .''r a,',.'r""1'T,-t,i-..reTi.eiicnt. a prosciiitioo
rrn'e. .ceatCltyDruS.ore
ret -2. 'M. 3,y "
CHARTER OAK
Life Insurance Company,
Hartford, Conn.
Incorporated ly the Slate of Connecticut.
Capital SJocR $2CO,000.
Wi th I strgc an J i ricreni su rpl Uf-rectijt t'.seaure-'
!y investpd unfler t!ie -jiinct i n aDd apiroTal of the
Comptroller of Public Aw cunts.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS;
JAMCSC. WAI.K.LKY, I'reMdent,
JOHN L. U VCi, Vice President.
ELI AS (5IIJ.. S.'rfary
E.D.DICKIillM AN, General Agent.
DIiirCTORS:
Alfred Gill, I):niicll!.nri-f.s, J..hnL.ranee,
K.r.lodet, J. A.l'.utl.-r, E. I). Di 4 e rnan
N.Whcatt.n, Sam.O i. Nelson Holliater,
Jauii ? 0. Walklejr.
T. W. TIPTON
Law,
r n o iv v ' u
Attorney
J D. N- THOIA'PSON,
ustico. uf Hie iYa-T and
Conveyancer,
MioWWriLUl, .YKlilUS.h
$Jt""-,vrie Jump 21 S6f
run L C ARSON
' T r'. TxT ZH ,
i;t,iH- i t'-, U'LCurnut Jhnry, Land
Yurrvn$. Exchatipe. and Gold Dud
, d nve. uucurreiit Hai.k Biila, anj
,:Vl! C..lierl.-..1Mrte on all accsable pouitf,
, M .. ,.u fii-itiH 5" at current rate.
r "office,
Mi! STRKIX KCTWGK THE
i'lc?riiJ and Hie LT. S.
Lund OHCS.
REFER EXCES:
,, ,e, Tbil.Klelpbia, Pa.
Baltimore, &Id.
:; . !. (".
J,. ' . - v -. G i'r nf Toil,
' : - , . . F. u. H jitter. Wdsbineton, D.C.
r - , i . 1. , . A t'y a' L'.
! , . ; -31 A. id. U.-8.T.
-..k H.-.ke-. .CWro.Ill.
, ,, iV S'. lmis. Mo.
; , ' ; f - iii ' Annapolia, Md.
J ' ,' ,-t.-' Metcertibur? Pa
J, v "fuv't S. Bin, DaeertownMd.
f S :, .'V. A J 8t LlW.
-., j.: I i-.r.'.ei .uAu'y at Law, Haaton, Md.
s .. j . . p,,..r Cnmrierland, Md
N.iv 8, 160-tf.
5 ,Mi:S S. BKDFOHD
I ATTORNEY AT LAW,
: AND n,
Master ri;ism!ioiier In Cuanccry.
PEASE & FOWLER,
BLACKSMITHS,
T7V7"rttox Stropt
BROWiNMLLE, ISEBUAblvA.
Hjv rccrntly located in thU place and solicit a 6hare
. trii'if r-Htr..r.aCe.' Their T.oik and price canuot ti
j Ucrve M!it.irurn. Prices for f-lmeiug borfes $1 0
; r billing n round witb new hhoes. Dec. 80; 3m
D. A. CONST A II LC ,
IMPOHTTR AS" PEAtlR IN
IRON, STEEL, NAILS,
CvSriMI, THINGS. AXLES, FILE
rtnT.T.n "717" s 9
AND
HL ACKSMITII'S TOOLS
Al: llu'w, Spokes, and Bent Stuff.
TVml street, dotween Pclix and EJmond,
SAINT JOSEPH. MO.
lit ti tin e!!s at ST . L ns li icesfor cah.
Holes'- u--i-- Paid for Scrap IroD.
J1f'-'illrl,l(,.y.
rvr r5i oy A.rivn UOorl Oil
PIKE3? PEAK GOLD!
I 'o, n i-A Pftak Mild dllVMtlC
i ac - r
"i"ry U"n 'tie Mtinr nd iy vf r ua'inceof proceeiiP
- ""i .M lit Ttmn- nrf had. In all r-es. I wi'
"ri.ii.ir ,, i,,tll relarns ot ibe Tailed StateMir ,
) . L . CARSON.
Sl'LLMN VM) EXriMNGFa BROKCK
II kl W N V I LLC. NLIIRASK4.
no20v4
T. M. T VinOTT.
DENTAL SURGEON,
lvto- 1 ..H.ted hi in self in Hr-.w nville. N. T., ten
I ''""his .' i"-;--i'.,Ti!il .rvic' ' tbeenmmnnity.
t ! i ' wrrn'fil.
u)-4ks Wiitr.liiis & Jewelry.
J. SCIIITTZ
'y (To-iM isanince o th- -itifenn nf Rr-nrll
vK'iniiy -tlai he ?ms looted hiinse!! in
." 'm 'i,orn''l.. ndinten-li- keeping a fui Ussort.
..-n .. ve-ythinain hisiioe .f business which wili
IJ .wf ,rili. Hpmi l ilsodi all kindb of re-
tiirto- .r l..rw wtclie nd ierelry. All work war.
T,""M vSnlSlv
H VAT
.laiiufao
7 BOOK
AM)
BIIJDEPvY,
COUNXIL BLUFFS. IOWA.
WILLIAM F. KITEIt.
y IT, 1S60. .
FAIRBANKS'
EIAKDAB.D
gfjSCALES
OF ALL KINDS.
FAiRBftKKS &GREEI1LEAF
Lilii: ST.. C13ICA(.0.
of Main & Walnut Bts. St. Louis
wr o'LT the crjfriyr.
3
S.TJ.'W.'sr'inl.M I. r?.niUins liyieian.
A. S. iL.lla l n.M I), Mi;-1 Kxii'ininer.
A i .nl ic.i , I v n - ee t-i i.H J I ' . ' . 1 1 ' U N A -. A z' t
nS-t
Hiownvill . N. T.
Johns & Crosley,
SOLE M ANTF A CTV R FTIS OFTHR IMPROVED
CEMENT ROOFING,
the Cheapest and most durable Rtofuxg
in vse.
IT IS FIRE JXD WATER PROOF
l cn be applied to new ;;ti'l old r..oM of a) I kinds, and
t'i -ht Tiwie r. im witbitjt i eni'Vi'iir t lie irjrifa.
Tliecosit is only one-ltiir! of Tin,
and is twice as durahlc.
Galta Pcrclia Cement
Fur pTi'prviiiB and rep.ni inn tin rtd other metal roofs
of evet p ieci iv ion, tioni it creit ciastictiy i not ln
jnie'l by th"? ciiit'nc'i.n and -xp iii-i n or metals, and
Will not crack in cold or Run in warm.
weather.
These materia have been lb .inwphly tCed' In Xew
Yoi k and all partf of the S luthern nd Western states
k'nd ,xe can give abundant proof of all we cUtmintbeir
' Tl'ey are readily applied by ordinary laborers at Irifl-
"no' he at IS REQUIRED."
These materials are put up ready for
use a.ndfor Shipping to all parts of the
Country, tciA fuU printed directions for
application-
Full descriptive circulars will be fur
nished on application by mail, or in per
son, at our principal office,
510, BROADWAY,
'Opposite St. Nirhe' "'tel ) NEW TORC.
JOHNS it CROSLEY.
Feb 23 1661. AGrs WANTED. 6 mn-
milKU FASHIONS.
BROWNVILLE
"
''
J ij t 1!
is
Jl. TO 2D
C1S3 1
li'i ;'ft Tf 0
MRS. IIEWETT,
MAIN STREET,
nnowxviLLC, xEDRisztA.
Annonnces to the laoics of Brownville and vicinity
that the hs just received her
SPRING STOCK
O 2J"
MILLINERY GOODS,
To which Fhe calls particular attention. Her R'o!s
are of the rery latest bt les aud are oflered at unusually
low prices.
April 4, 1SC0.
Hew bhoe shop.
W- CS-SLjSa,KrfX,5
BROIV.YVILLE. NEBRASKA,
RerTjctfully informs the citizens of this place and
vicinity that he has commenacd the manufactory of
B.M.ts and sis es in Erownville, and hopes by attention
and care to merit a share of public patronage. His
st.xk isall of the best quality, and his work all war
ranted to "give satisfaction or no p.ty."
All stvlfs'of work, from a No. 1. fine calf skin boot,
to acosr-e ferocan, and at prices so low that tiona can
Complain. ...
Give me acail at my shop on Firet street, between
Main and Water.
B-- wnville May 9 1P61 ly
John (iarnett. Vv liliam K'K-niufr. u id Jiitr.e P.
I SI linden, (the hitter. Ion a Sfdsman in the m
ploy of Messrs Lan Jicth A S.in) have uuiU-d Under
the Crui of
JOHN GANNETT & CO.
for the ruoEcuTioN ur THE
Agricultural Implement
anT
SEED BUSINESS,
They will constantly ki ' n httmt a full svipplyof
Landrdh's Warranted Garden Seeds,
all fr.h mid of th.-lust ViMr's LToWth.
To h. obtiin' d at the oM h..u-o at rhihideljtliia.
and wi'l confine thi ir sales f (.Harden Sccdi ejcclu
siv to (ho. They will k.-cp very lare r.tock of
All Implements and Machinery ill Use,
EMBRACING ALL TUB LEADISO A KTICLK3 IN THE
TKAI'E, OF TUB BKST Ji INC F ACTl'KB.
Thv -,.ii,.it thrt n.mt.inuuvl cust.uu of ihoir friends,
-nrl .,t .11 Hi.ma who have d.alt at tho branch hou
of Landrkth A Son, at St. Iui. Our price shall
be very low. in acco. dance wttn tne times, :iu o
hone to satislv all who call on us,8 to the tupcrior
quali y of our stock, and the prices.
Our T, rmnrt Caxh, and ftrtct to corrcpind.
JOHN GARNETT & CO.,
V2.J4 ST. LOUIS, MO.
Takes pleasure in announcir rr to th" citizens of Brownville and vicinity, that he has
just opened a nevv LIVERY STABLE, where he wili always be
ready to furnish gentlemen with
ScicLeLXo Slorses, Siisie,
0t2T3ig;e3, etc., etc.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
JOHN A. SHALL.
Brownrille, June 19'h. 1S61.
(n50-ly)
FEED XUiilizELVXS! .
New Eating Saloon.
BENJ. WHYTE,
lias opened a new Eatinjr lion so on Main street,
next door to the U. iS. Laud Office in Brownviiio,
whero
CAN BE HAD
AT ALL HOURS
All kinds of game served cp esdesired, at tho
shortest notice.
Oysters, Quails. Prairie Chickfns.
Fih, Veniton, Pes, Califs, Hot
Coffee. Sweet and BuU.er
Milk. Muhaud Milk,
and all such.
Como fvxxcl 0oo Mo ! !
Pike's Peak, or Bust."
provision mm.
DRY GOODS HOUSE.
jyj"o. 3LXV XVLtxTC street
BROWNVILLE, H. T.
CIITLHBBT.SHBLE
J. B5EIRISY & Co
Have Jnst completed their new business house on
Main Street, near the U.S. Land Office, in Brownville
where they have opened out aDd areoffering on the most
favorable lerws.
Gr3FS.O OE! RIB S
Dry Goods, Provisions
Or all Kinds,
FLOUR, CONFECTIONAMES,
CltHEV 4XI 13 SI I C J FRUITS,
Choice Liquors, Cipars,
And a "thousand and one,'' other things everybody
needs.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR STOCK
R"..w:M'ii:e Aori' 16 IV
THOMAS DAVIS.
ECLECTICPHYSICIAN
S TJ I O EON;,
TABLE ROCK. NED RASE A.
li'-'i-r-tiC'-, 2)r. 1). 'v n. Brownville.
Apr.l n4.)-Iy
Fiiruilurti Manufactory.
AND
GENTliEMiiilN'b VVHiiiV
JACOB MAUOtlN,
MERCHANT TAILOR
imOWXVILIX, A E 15 U ASK A,
Has just returned from St. Louis wkhu entire
new stock of
LATEST STYLES ;
Of Goods for Gentlemen's wear, which he will
make to order ar short notice, and in a mnnner he
warrants to be satisfactory.
His stock consists in part of black, colored and
mixed cloths ; blsek, colored and mixed doeskins;
black, colored, lancy and mixed Cassimers; fine
Kentucky Jeans, Chock?, Cottonades. Linens, dril
lings, docks. Satins, Vesting, Braids, Buttons, cords
Ac. He returns his thnnko the pentlemn of this
place and vicinity for their past liberal ptronae,
and respectfully invites thein to call and examine
his new stock. He feels confident that in the fu
ture as in the past, he will be able to give entire sat
isfaction. Brownville, March 21, lS6ft,-ly
HELVIft HILLS.
KEJIAHA CITY. NEBltSKA-
Casli fox A7Iioat,
Ttie public are luiormcd that at Weivin's Mills that
goto 90 cents c.ish is being raid for good mei clu ntable
wheat. Also wheat and corn grouDd Jor toll as osual.
So-2J J. G. MKLV1'.
Feeci fSJtosro
BROWNVILLE, NEBRASKA.
ROGERS & BROTHER,
i v-v-nrrvrfi tn im nnhiic that he has purchased, the
i i.Lrv c,',ht.Md st.ick forrreriy owned by Wihiani
It -sscil and ad led thereto flue stock, aad is now prepar
ed to accommodate the public with
Carri.igeSj
BuggicSj . -;,
Sulkies,
Saddles Horses
&c. &c.
THE TRAVELLUiG PUBLIC
Tan find at his Stable ample accommodations for
horse, mules or cattle.
BENJAS lis . JtJJUUA nuviJiikj.
Brownville, Oct. 18, 1SG0. nl5-yly
1859. 1859.
UAVMOAL & ST. JOSEPH II. U.
he Underiig-nod havin.T op:-ntd a h
at the
T3 J3
iinLJll hv" k fc
FALL ARRAKGEMEXTS. :
Mornlnit Train leaves St. Joseph at - - :00
EveninK Train leaves io do - 6:n
St. Joseph Is reached by the Western Stape Line.
Pasenners savetime and tiresome stapinn by thisror.te.
Daily connections made t Hannibal with all"Eastern
nnd Southern Railroads and Packets.
J T D Haywood, Sup't., Hannibal.
D C Sawijj, General Agent, St. Joe
P B Groat, G. Ticket Agent, Han'bai
Theo. Hill, G. T. Ag't, Brownville
Kovember 24. 185B.
NciuBuppiiiaf Stau
I have jnst received a new surjIy u
COOK STOVES
Of tYi 1;itfst iirnl most, imr.rr.rrd natterns. w
V. MW ' - v
troToe to scll'Bt sach prices as cannvt be oom:l:Mi-
. M. 1 ' ' 1 . II 1 A.n,n!no
ed oil. 1 ne I'Uoiic are inMicii to chii Mini r.miuun.
As usual my stock of Tin, Sheet Irm an ! CojiH r
Ware is lanre ana ci rcy own m:inutacrti'.
J.C.DUSER
April 11,1651. n40yly
BROWNVILLE STEAM MILL,
Are prepared to pot up all kinds of
CiiEIiiiT WML
To order, at short notice. V7e will manufacture
BUREAUS SAFES
DESKS TABLES
STANDS LOUNGES
CRIB CRADLES-
ROCKING OFFICE ,
CHAIRS CHAIRS
WINDOW LOUNGES
CHAIRS &c. &c.
TrJh ak aleA MrT9
ncom i!" v w w a
-ct w a hjivpf.n hand wpII sronM Blaci
1 1 1 ' ' l Ul' f iv ii. -
w . .., i,,rKnp f.r tht nurryM V. haVP thel.Clll-
V a 1 II Ul 1 U IHUV" - mm- r - r - '
ties of making furniture as cheap as It can he Tarnished
in this country, when ouraDiiuy is tacea iuo u.e ac
count, as wo warrant all ol our wcrk.
VTe Solicit the patronage of the community.
Te will take in exchange for fnrnlture all iin1st
farm nrodnce. The behest price, for butter, eggs,
and lard will be paid the entire hot season.
Browrjville, May 30, ly.
CHAMBERS fc XOTES.
REAL ESTATE
H , R
lib)!
I ;l IT I if I ' I 'r f II T I
1
AND
oll ectio d Office
OF
BROWNVILLE, NEBRASKA.
Main, Bdiceen Levze and First Streets.
Parllcnlar attention sivrn to the
l'Hi-cliase am! Sale ol'Ileal
Estate, lakijipr Col
lections and
Payment of Taxes for Xon-Kcsi-d
ent s.
LAND W AUftASTS t'UU SALE, frr h and on
U LAND WARRANTS LOCATED f Eastern r!ap
it"Hfts on hiTid.-i -c'e,;red from pr.iial exam'pati"",
nrd 'n. comjih-te T.-wr.ship Map. shnwir? Stream",
Tiiner. fi rw.irdid with the Certificate of loca
tion. lroivDvjlie,y. T.Jan. 3, 1851. yl
Flax as SafcsUtGtc for Cotton-
Since the ustal supply of cotton has
been cut off by the blockade of the South
ern ports, public attention has been
aroused to institute measures for - obtain
ing a substitute for it. The Board of
Trade in mis city, at a recent meeting,
discussed the subject at much length, and
proposed the formation of an association
for the development and application, of
flax to take the place of cotton in our
manufactures. More zeal than knowl
edge distinguished the proceedings of th"
B -ard in relation to this qntion. If we
cannot obtain cotton fo. our manufacture,
of course we mint have som thing !?e;
but in the present s'ate of the ans flax
Cinnut b-' produced a a cheap substitute
fur it The public should be made aware
of this fact, so that thre .may be no de
lusion on this important question. We
shall endeavor to make this perfectly
clear.
The fiber of cotton exists free in the
ball as it picked from the plant, and it
only requires to be subjected to the sim
ple mechanical operation of ginning tore
move'ihe seed, when it is fit for the first
operations in the factory. Flax, on the
other hand, requires to be rippled or
threshed, then rotted, dried and skutched,
involving several exdensive chemical and
mechanical operations, extending ovr a
number of days, to put it in the condition
obtained by the simple gin in the case of
cotton. Flax grows like grass ; it has a
stalk with a pith or woody heart, and the
fiber forms the sheath. This fibep is ce
mented with vegetable gue and bitumen,
which have to be decomposed by the rot
ting process before the pith can be re
moved and the fiber set free. Improved
processes maybe discovered to render the
preparation of flax less expensive, but we
think, than that of cotton.
At the present time, the prices of cot
ton in our market range from 11 l-4c per
pound for. ordinary upland, 15 5-Sc, per
pound for fair New Orleans. In ordi
nary peaceful times, the prices range
about two cents less than the above.
Flax, of an equal degree of fineness of
fair cotton, is not an article commonly sold
in our markets ; but in Europe it is four
times the price of cotton. vvhy, our
common dressed American hemp, acoarse
fiber of the flax species, is the same price
as ordinary upbnd cotton, and Italian
hempis 11 l-4c. per pound by the tun.
Another mistaken idea has also been
isseminated among the community,
namely, that by reducing flax to what is
called -'flax cotton" it becomes a substitute
for common cotton. The process of cot-
ionizing - flax consists in reducing it to
short fiber by a combined chemical and
mechanical process.
Several years ago Chevalier ClausSen
produced considerable of a sensation in
Europe in making flax cotton, by first
steeping the flax in a strong solution of
oarhonate of soda, then iT dilute sulphuric
acid. The acid disengaged carbonic aeid
cas in the pores of the flax, and split the
fibers into short staple. This processs
1ms been fairly tested in this country, but
without pecuniary success. Several other
parties besides Ciaussen have introduc d
peculiar mode 3 of canonizing flax ; and
the Ly.iian process, ly sulj-'Ciing it
high pr s.Mire steam first, then p-rmitting
it to xpatid su 'derily. effects tl.is object
in a mo. t simp! and not too expensive.
But we curiu m impress the fant to0 strong
ly upon th'- pnl lie mind, that, in llvi pre-
para-i:-i: of flix for spinning, the c:'ttor.-
izuiir of it is t;;e very thing uhicn should j
be avoided, One oi the valuable quali- j
ties ot in consists in us I'inj noer.
This enables it to bo spun upon proper
machinery at less expanse than com. on.
It is therefore, a rui-taken nation tore,
duce the liber of flax to a cotton condition
to fit it for spinning on cotton machinery.
The great expense connected with it is
its preparotion, and obtaining a long sta
ple; and every attempt at improving the
the processesconnected with its treatment
should have special reference to prevent
the cottonizing of it. We do not wish to
discourao-e the cultivation of flax and the
development of its manufactures, but we
consider it our duty to warn enthusiasts
against the delusion of raising flax, and
manufacturing it into goods to be sold at
anything like so cheap a price as cotton
fabrics have been furnished during the
last thirty years. Scientific American.
Budding may be done fro.n the first
of June until late in the fall; but it is
j not always best to bud too early, or else
the buds are apt to grow out the same
year, and are then liacle to be killed in
winter. From the middle of August to
the middle cf September is as good time
as any.
First, trim off the leaTes end small
branches that might be in the way ; then
having got n scion of whatever you wih
to bud, of medium size, and pretty well
matured, cut off the leaves so as to leave
from one-fourth to one-half of an inch
of the leaf-stalk adhering to the bud ;
then take the scion in your left hand, place
y.iiir left hand fore-finger under the bud.
and wuh a sharp ki ife cut out the bul,
commencing above the bud and finishing
at the -bottom; cut your bud from three
fourths to one inch in length, taking care
not to cut the lower part of the bud too
short or too thin, which you will be tpt
to do at first. It is generally best to cut
a thin piece of wood with the bark, but
care must be taken not to cut too much ;
then taking the bud by the leaf-stalk
with your left hand, make a horizontal
cut across the place where you wish to
insert your bud, then a perpendicular one
below, making a figure resembling the
letter T; with the point of your knife,
lift one of the corners of the bark, and
insert the point of your bud, then lift the
other corner also, at the same time shov
ing down the bud with your left hand,
your bud will now be from one-third to
one-half way in, then place tho thumb
nail of your right-hand on the leaf-stalk
of the bud, and shove it down to its place
letting the bark raise the wood itself as
you shove it in, but be careful not shove'
it down too far. Then tie with bass or
a string, commencing at the bottom and
winding it upward, and tie above the bud,
you need not wind close with a view to
exclude the air. If your bud is about an
inch long, winding it firmly some six or
seven times will be sufficient.
Bass is the best thing to tie with, and
it is made by stripping the bark from
Linn or Basswood and Pawpaw trees, and
then sinking it in water for some two
weeks when the bark will be sufficiently
decomposed, and it will be found to con
sist of thin layers of fibre very much re
sembling silk ribbon. Cut this into prop
er lengths and split so as to be somewhat
hss than one-fourth of an inch wide; and
when wanted for use it should be damp
ened a little. Pawpaw bass is superior
to Linn, being stronger and less coarse.
Should the trees be growing very rap
ly, it will be necessary to untie and then
re-tie the buds after having been insert
ed about a week, to prevent them from
being cut by the ties.
We differ in opinion from the writer
of the above article, with regard to the
danger of budding trees too early in the
season. If the budding is done in the
latter part of May, or at any time pre
vious to the 20th of June, the top of the
tree or limb that is budded should be cut
off above the bud within two or three
weeks from the time the budding was per
formed. If the tree is thrifty the bud
will immediately commence growing, and
will a row several inches, and sometimes
even several feet that season. There
will If no danger of the winter killing
it. There is, however danger cf winter
killing trees budded in July. There are
several reasons why budding should not
be d.me in July. If the weather is dry
ap does not flow freely, and the bud gen
erally withers up. Frequently the sap
stops flowing entirely for two or three
weeks in the middle of summer, during
which time budding cannot be performed
at all.
(From the Valley Farmer.
Luddlng-
Budding is a very simple operation,
and may be done by any one who will
exercise a little judgment with tolerable
success; and farmers could often use the
budding knife to good advautage on their
farms. There may be some thrifty trees
that bear very indifferent fruit, that can
be worked over with a' better sort, and
thus in a short time make good and prof
itable trees. There may also be some
fine seedlings in the fence corners and
other out of the way places, that might
be budded with some good fruit. Dif
ferent colored roses might also be bud
ded on one stock, which would produce
a fine erfect when in bloom. In fact
there are many things on nearly all farms
that.rr.ight be improved by budding; and
thinking that some of your numerous
readers might wish to do some budding
this season 1 ill give them the method
which I have found best in rny experi
ence of many years.
Brjlzis tHe Coiamoii Rca Currant.
The currants should be quita ripe when
gathered, with the p:e:r3 attached, 1
washed or rinsed effectually and drained
off. Then stem them" and wash then
thoroughly, and to each pound of currants
add a quarter of a pound of good HaTacn
sugar, then place them in a preserving
kettle, over afire, until they come to a
scaM heat, wh?n they are turned cut in
to white eartLia dishes, and exped to
the action of the sun, until, by evapora
tion, they become hardened en ths up
per side. Then they ar turned over,
and there remain until they beccmo so
on the other side, and so alternately un
til they become a sort of leathern tex
ture, when they are put away in earthen
jars or boxes, until wanted for uso. Care
must be taken to keep them from the.
dews of -night. and rains during the pro
cess of drying ; finally, the utmost clean
liness should be observed during the en
tire process.
When used, enough hot water is re-
: i .i t. .i . . .
quueu .u uitzuiw uieui tu any tuustsieu-'
tency suitable for tarts, jelly, &c. At
the same time, more sugar is required
to make them quite palatable, which must
of course be governed by taste. Cur
rants in this wav havfi kpnt well, with
U3 for three years, and the presumptioa '
is, that they will keep for a longer tuse
if well cared for.
Eilllns Smut In Seed Grain.
Wash the grain thoroughly with water
two or three times ; swim off as rnuchof
the lighter seeds, (oats, &.C., if there bo
any,) as I can drain off ihe water;
then put in four to six quarts strong brine?,
to the bushel; stir it well ; then add slack
ed lime to absorbe the moisture, and to
keep the kerneta sticking together after
it is well stirred. It will be as well ta
let it stand a day or two in the brine be--fore
the line is added, or it may lay two
or three days after the lima is put in,
without injury, if it is stirred once cr
twice a day ; but I most generally pre
pare it and sow it a3 soon as I can.
The above is my plan for "preparing
seed wheat. I have practiced il for sev
eral years, and I have never known a
crop of when to bo smutty, raised from
seed thu3 prepared. - I once bought soma
very smutty wheat for seed, and prepar
ed it a3 above, and had a fine crop, while
the man I bought cf sowed the same kind
without preparing it, and had very srau
ty wheat. Cor. Country Cent.
Lawns When to Sott.
In an essay recently read before the
Progressive Gardeners Society, by H.
Pettigrew, the month of August 13 re
commended as the best time to grow grass
seed on lawns.
What to Seed with. He recom
mended equal parts of Kentucky blue
grass and Perennial rye gra-:3. William
Saunders call poa pratensi3 (speer or
green grass) one of the best as in the
course of time it takes the place of al!
others which may bo sown. R. Robinson
Scott says there are not more than three
or four kinds that can be employed with
safety.
Of these the Red Top, (Agrostis Vul
garis,) Green or Meadow grass. (Poa
pratensis) and Timothy ( P Men m pretense)
are the most reliable; Kentucky Blue
Grass, which as far as I can judge is no
thing else but green- meadow grass, of a
stronger growth, has been highly extolled;
those who do not believe in its identity
with poa pratensi3, may add it to the list.
Red Top alone, has been sown with good
results in more northern districts, as it is
very hardy, withstanding both the heat of
summer and cold of winter. Green grass
is the favorite grass in this vicinity. In
lawn mixtures such grasses as Sweet Ver
nal, Perennial Rye grass, and one or two
others are occasionally used, which are
not at all suited for a lawn. The Sweet
Vernal is a poor, week growing variety,
only odhered to prove the idea of its rrv-
I ing the sweet odor to hay, and Perennial
Rye grass grows on good soil in strong
tut'ls or hills, quite dissimilar to the other
varieiies, thus spoiling the entire appear
ance of the lawn. "Prairie Farmer.
Broadcasting and Drilling
An array cf nineteen reasons why it
is better to sow in drills than broadcast.
1. Drill requires much less skill.
2. It requires less time.
3. It requires less labor.
4. It requires less seed.
5. It can be done in spite of wind
weather.
6. It insures a mere even distribution
of the seed.
7. It injures the covering cf all tb.8
seed.
8. It insures the covering cf the seed
at the proper depth
9. It facilitates the sowing of mixed
seed.
10. It insures the covering cf the seed,
with the best earth.
11. It obviates the "packing" cf tea
heavy soils.
1.v It fnriiitntrs t!ir nmlir.atinn cf fefJ
tilizers. , -
13. It leaves furrows, and thus .pro
motes furrows.
14. It diminishes the danger of wintef
killing.
15. It lessens the injury by drough.
16. It provides for convenience of cul
tivation. 17. It secures better airing and sanninj
of the plants.
18. It insures a more uniform ripening.
19. It insures a larger and a better
crop.
Barley for Pork 3Iak!ss-
At a Farmers' Club in Illinois, reported
in the Farmers' Advocate, inquiry was
made fcr experience in feeding barley to
hogs. One member had fed it, bat with
out comparison with corn, as to value.
41 It is made the best sweet meat, and free
from the oilines3 so common to corn-fed
pork." Another thought barley double
the value of corn fcr fattening purpose
The pnnnirer said hisatlentian wa3 calkd
to it by the great success cf an eastern
farmer in fattening pigs on ground barley
and milk, getting three hundred pounds
dressed weight, at nine months eld. :
Judge cf Toledo, Ohio, has a lit
tle four year old boy, who one day, when
company was present, wished a seat at
the table, but was sent a away with tha
remark that his whiskers were cot lorj
enough for him to sit there. Tha littlo
chap took a seat by a stand, vharo a izr
vant gave him his dinner. While eatirj
it, the house cat came purring arcund hinf,
when he said: "Oh, go off! your whisk
ers are lig enough to eat at the otner
table."
To destroy flies, to one pint of milk
add a quarter of a pound of raw sugar,
and two ounces of raw pepper; simmer
them together eight or ten minutes, and.
place it about in shallow dishes. The
flies attack it speedily and are soon suffo
cated. By this method, kitchens, 2ic.
may hi kept clear of these pest3 all sum ¬
mer without the danger attending1
son.
Cli