Nebraska advertiser. (Brownville, Nemaha County, N.T. [Neb.]) 1856-1882, September 27, 1860, Image 1

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    TUE- ADVERTISER,
. rrBLISKO EVERT TEXRSDAT BT
FURNAS '& LYANNA,
9oond story Stricter'. Block, Kain Street,
HROTV.WILIX, S. T.
THE ADVERTISER,
TERM3:
$5 00
00
w vvy w -V vyvyy
i .rniiVp'ir.lf paid in advance, - - - f
7or.e year if p , m j
. . U "
-u.uVf 1 r more 11 te f urnWbed at $1 60 per
m prUrd-Vhech accompanies the order, not
,1
I'.ATi;3 OP ADVrriTIXIJO:
11 f f
Ay
1L
1
V' AV .
"Free (o Form and Kegnlatc ALL lficir Domestic Institutions la their own ray, snhject only to tlie Constitution of the United States."
.ie square (10 Unesor Ies) -ufiiiaerti.n,
Uc iijti..Ba!iB3ertic,
One si(U)ire, wie IU'nt, -- - . .
3 jsi Oi of six line r ieM,outyer,
i?neMiu:nn one year, - -
o,np-rt;:r C'liiimnone rear, ------
One fourth Colums one ve.ir. - - -;)iieei;ii;h
C'luuin one yejr, - - - - -
tr ie col u;nnt x mont us, ------
() 10 a!f Colvrpn sit m 'nf!i, - i .
One fourt a Ci.laiiiu i n ii' l, - - - - -
O'leeiphth C'llatnn lii E;oi,:'t,, - . .
('ie Column three r.Kir.hs, ------
One b.lf Column lreent'-t);a,
One fnurih Coluum three rn n!:.. - - - -
():iceihth C;l umn tbree mrtfc, - - .
.-UjUiicin;: culltef or v.-.r (In alnv e.
- M ti
- lb
& OQ
S .) CO
2 ) ej
) (H
35 ro
0 !)
10 W
8 CO
- 00
1) (A)
ia c
6 fid
- 6 0 .
VOL. V.
J ITS I NESS CA11DS.
BROWNVILLE, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1860.
NO. 12.
A. tCHOEKKIIT
Tohnsou & Selioenlieit.
TTORNEYS AT LAW,
solicitors cham ::rY,
Corner First and Main ' '- .
ovuuius - - -
A. D. KIRK,
Attorney -atrLair,
and A&cat and Notary Public.
Rulo, Richardson Co.,J. 1
Tillpracticeip the Courtsof MitcXebraska,
rdiognd Bennett, Xcbratka City.
J. B. WESTON,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Drownville, Nebraska.
-J-i)T.ceon Mirin Stnet, ohe door above tLe Post
rowmine, Drccinlier 1, ISM-
W. TIPTON,
Attornqyat Law,
BR O WXF1LLE, JV. T.
To Ladies of Brownville,
MRS. MARY HEVETT
' DR. D, GWIN,-
Havin prrmanpntly located in
ROWNVILLE, NEBRASKA,
or the firaciiee tf Medicine and Surgery, ten
I hi prffexionnl services to tho afHicted.
!3e on Main Street. rn.23r3
. ..uf i. iust received irom me
Eiwt a ujanilicent Ptock of
MILLINERY GOODS
Consisting of
STRAW, FRENCH CHIP,
GIMP LEGHORN,
SILK, & CRAPE
UONNETS.
French Flower.-, Straw Trimmings, Ribbon?, etc..
To which she invitestbe attention of the Ladies of
ij.w..nifl .ml vicinitv. feclintr assured tbey cannot
be better suited in etjle, quality or price.
April 12,1853
3VEoxxoy-clxr,xiLCOci on
PIKES'S PEAK GOLD !
ire receive IW Peak Gold, aid ndvance
!L ,.n ti, amn. and par over t'siahce of proceeds
Vuon as Mint return, are had. In all ca-es we will
exhibitthe printed returns of the United States Mint,
orA7SnAir.ii &cai:sox.
BILLION AND EXCHANGE OUOKEllS
Merchant Tailor,
JACOB IiTARHON,
BR OV7N VILLE, N. T.
BROWNVILLE, KEDRASKA.
no20v4
A. S. 110 LL AD AY, M. D.
.vLPrtfullvinMnis hm 'friend In Brownville and
.c'liate vir.uiiy tiit Lehiis rooumed the practice of
;dic-lnc, Surpeiy, & Obstetrics,
h,.ne i.vKtnctattenUon to hlsprofeHHion, to receive
i K'.'iier..,'i putr.nwiKe heretofore extended tohim. In
where It i pohKihleor expedient, a prescription
aieiil he-t.n.e. oilice at CiiyPrug Store.
Kib.24,69. 5.1y "
L. M. JOHNSON, M. D.,
IlYSlCfAN AND SURGEON,
Offl'-e t IT. C. J.diimoti' Liw Office,
Tirst Street, between llain and Water,
Clocks, Watclies & Jewelry.
J. SCHITTZ
-v rouldanuouncetothecitiens of Brownville
V and vicinity that he has located himself in
i5lLiBrownvile, andintende kcepiiiR a f ul 1 assort,
lueni of everything in his lineof business, which will
tesoIdlw for cash. He will also do all kinds of re
pairing of clocks, watches and jewelry. All work war
rantee v3nl81y
CITY LIVERY STABLE.
XKIIR4SK4,
i&IT IITIUTIH
; NEWSPAPERS,
A?SD-
X oxrio c3-ioctls3,
Of every description, for sale at
SCHIITZ '& DEUSER'S
, ITERiVRY DEPOT,
; Duth-cast corner Main and Second,
. BItO W N VILLE, N. T.
1 j t, 22 J, 1 S'i'.h f-ntll
...'4'UAKV. ' O.B. ItEWETT. K.W. THOMA
; Garv, llewett it Thomas,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
; OLiCITORSIX CHAXCERY.
.Broviivlllc, Nebraska.
I rjcJfre in the CiHirts of Nebraska, and North
JipsouiI.
REFERENCES.
sr. Crow,Mcfeary 8tCo., St. Louis, Mo
. damex U. U.iKhs,
i. John R. -Sheply,
i. Jme-('raie.
i . Mllu WiMMlKon,
, Sainnel V. Klack,
, N'K-kolln. Ksy .,
ver S'pet a. Co. ,
. Film
Do
Do
St.Josepb.Mo.
Do
NTct.raka C.. 1.T.
Ttrowuvil.c
1 Tivitle, a.'. T.tK-t. 3.1858.
vlnl6
v, :
E. S. DUNDY,
4- TTOUNEY AT LAW,
iRcnrn, RicnriDoN co. y. t.
. practice In the several Courts of the 2d Judicial
.nod attend to all matters connected with the
.n. Wm. MXLeksaN, Ks.,or Nebraska City,
M me tii the prostcutinnvf iinportanl Suits .
fr 0. 'B,U-tf
I A. C O X ST A.B LE ,
IMPORTER A!?I PEALEH I!
X )N, STEEL, NAILS,
IXGH SPRINGS, ; AXLES, FILE
CEIjZjO X7" 23 ,
ACKSMmi'S TOOLS
WM. ROSSELL,
BltOWN VILLE, N. T.
Announces to the V'iblic that he is prepared to accom
modate those wishinp with Carriases and BuppiOh ; to
gether with coodsafe horses, for comfort and ease in tra
velling. He will also board horses by the day. week or
month. TER!iIS FAVORABLE.
Jnne 10, 68. 60tf " - '
1859. 1850.
ii ix.MKAS & st. josr.ru n. i.
jli5? Oi :i-i-s ,i2
FALL ARH-lNGtilKSTS. .
Mominc Train leaves St. Joseph at - - - C:00
KveniiiR Trsin leaves do do - - ?:4l)
St Joseph is reached by the Testcrn Stape Line.
ratsenters save time and tiresome staginpby this route.
Daily connections made at Ilannibal with all.Eastern
and Southern Railroads andPacket6.
J T D Haywood, Sup't., Hannibal.
D C Sawis, General Agent, St. Joe.
P B Groat, G. Ticket Agent, Han'bal
1 IIEO. Hill, G. T. Ag't, Brownville.
November 24, 1S53.
Adopts this method of returning thanks to the
gentlemen of this vicinity, for the liberal patron
fige bestowed open him heretofore, and to tinnonneo.
that ao baa just returned from fot. Louis with a
;V. . PRESH STOCK . J
Of every article of
GENTLEMEN'S WEAR,
Consisting of
FINE CLOTHS, .
mTJZT2MLX2T. GOODs,
Cotton, Linnen and Silk Goods,
FOR MEN'S WEAR.
Woolen, Cotton, and Silk Undershirt?, drawers,
Vnstinnrs. Half Hose. Sustenderp. 4c. In short, ev
ery thing a gentleman could desire to array himself
in tlio gayest attire, lie will sell tnegooas, ortnae
suits to order in a style equal to any other IIouso
wny where, Ho asks but an examination of his goods
acd work.
Prices,
Correspond with. -the Present Hard
Times.
April 12, 1RC0.
MORTON HOUSE,
MAIN STREET,
NEBRASKA CITY, XCSlRASCA.
T. L GODDIN, Proprietor.
September, 2P.1S:.9. tf.
Published March 17th,
Another New Work by the Distinguished
American Authoress,
IL1I3IA I. E. X. SOUTIIWORTII.
Ilnuiitoa nomestoad,
M'ith an autobiography of the author, by Mrs, EMMA
D. E.N. Southworth, Author of the Lost Heiress,
Deserted Wife, MissiiiK Jlride. India, "Wife's Ti--tory,
Retribution, Curse of Clirtuu, Tlvia, Tl e Three ou
ties. La.ly of the IsJe, etc.
. Conipletiono lart-e daxlecimo volun.o. ;.-t! .-.tind
iieetoth, Xor one dollar and twenty-flve eeM-s r r In t j
) nnies, pupr .tnver f'.r fee dollar.
Save Your .Money and Go To
WMT-.DEN,
BINDERY ,
COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA.
WILLIAM F. KITER.
May 17, 1860. '
Planter's House
JOHN M'MECIIAN PROPRIETOR,
Corner of Fourth and Com. Street,
IMolornslia City, HXTolo-
-I T
I: r. Hubs, Spokes, arid Tent Stuff.
.uird Street, betwren Felix and Edmond,
5." INT JOSEPH, MO.
rbich he sells at St. Louis rrices for cash.
litchest Price Paid for Scrap Iron,
t f nl.erl, ISM.-ly.
t 1
i
V .
en .
rs
iai:
MINBT. CItAS. F. HOLLY.
KINNEY & HOLLY,
FORNEYS AT LAW,
.EIIXIASKA C1TY,C T.
: acticein the Courtnol this Territory. Collec-
rimiual busanes attended to throughout K.
r.torulowa aud Xissourl. Will attend the
t Browuville. . v2u33-6m
JESSE HOI.LADAT. ALEXIS MTDD
ILGIIES & 1IOEEADAY,
No. 1, City Buildings,
r LOUIS ... MISSOURI.
?Il'DDk& II OLE AD AY,
5o. 140, rer!. Street,
luce' and. Commission
:3n.oi:a-,i,o.
WE trri IT PESMISSIOX TO
11, Lev jr . Leicon, - - St. Joseph,
KarleiU, . "
1. Curd - - .
e, McOord & 0-,. - .
ol is. axton . .
i Island A head of tht World ! !
OK HERE! LOOK HERE!
tGLES 11 SHIHGLES11
.lersicned takes this method of informing
as of Neiaaha County, and the rest of man-
t he has, and will keep on had a superior
ttonwood Shingles, which he wiU'sellcheai)
OR CASH OR PRODUCE,
.ingle 1.T -rhine is on the Sonora Island, ner
iSw Mill, where he m.iy be found when he
ent on professional business. Hire him a
he will giro you gstisfaetion.
12.1SC0. (6m) MERIUITH HELVY.
T. M. TALBOTT,
iNTAL SURGEON,
1 located himself in Brownville, N. ten
rfenional services to theconununity
warracted.
FRANKLIN
TYPE & STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY
No. 16S Vine SUbeLFourthand. Fifth,
Cincinnati, 0.
C. F. O'DRISCOEE & CO
Manufacturers find dealcrsin Is ews, Book ana JoD
Type, Printing Presses. Cases, Gallies, kc, &c.
Inks, and Printing Material of Every Description,
STEREOTYPING of all kind Books, Music.
PatentMedicineUirections,Jobs,WoodEnsrevings.
Ac.. f e.
Brand and Pattern Letters, variousstyles,
SAINT JOSEPH
Female College,
ST. JOSEPH, MO.
WlttlALI CAlJEKON, A. II., Principal.
Completely organized as a CrstclassremaleBoardlnjr
and Day School. Xumber limitrfl to 125. including Z5
boarders. Scholastic year commencing first Monday In
September. For Catalogues, with full particulara,ad
drcss the Principal. :
August 4th, 1869. T4n4tf
4lIkc's Peal., or Bust."
itrw
PROVISION '; STORE,
DRY GOODS HOUSE.
No. XX, IVXrtin atroot,
BEOWNVILLE, II. T.
OT ill 191
Wholesale and Ketail dealer in
BOOTS AND SHOES.
Brownville, X. T.
HAS NOW OX HAND a larpe and well sclect
JJ'J ed stock of Boots slid Shoes, Lady'i and Geut.'s
f j; ;niters and Slippers of every variety; also,
Misses and Childrens shoes cf every kind that 1
will sell cheaper for Cash or Produce than any other
house west of St. Louis. All work warranted; orders
respectful iy solicited.
The Highest Cash price paid for Hides, Pelts and Furs,
at the City Boot and Shoe Store. Cut Leather kept for
taie .
Brownville. Jnne 2d, 'C9.
nl9jf-
J.ESERlSf'&Co
nave Just complete- thfir r.ew business house on
Vain Street, near the 1. S. Land OflBce, in Brownville
where they have sned out and are offering on the most
favorable terms, .
GrLO CHS EL-1 S
Dry Goods, Provisions,
Of all Kirds, - - 1
FLOUR, CONFECT10NARIES,
GREEX AXD DRIER FRUITS,
Choice Liquors,' Cigars,
And a "thousand and one," other things everybody
needs.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR STOCK
Brownville, April 26, Iy
Mrs. Hcnclgeii & Miss Lusk,
HILLINERS AND DRESS LKERS,
First Street, bet. Slain and Water, ,
BROWNVILLE, - NEBRASKA,
Bonnets. Utad-Dretts and Trinmig a!icc'jtoiikand
AMERICAN. -HOUSE.
D3"OT7vT E30"to3.
BROWNVILLE, NEBRASKA.
P. J. HENDGEN,
Herely notifies the rublic that he has purchased the
Nebraska Hour.oiu Brownville, N. T., formerly kept by
T. J. Kdw.mls, and has remodeled, renovated and enti
rely changed the whole honse, from cellar to Barret,
with an especial view to neatness, comfort and conve
nience. Having badmany years experience as a hotel
keeper. he feels safe in warrantinptheboardinp patron
afxeof Brownville. and the traveling public, that, while
at the American, they will have no reason to complain
ofthefarein any respect.
The Hotel is situated immediately at the Steamboat
Landing, foot of Main street, and consequently allbrds
peculiar advantages to the traveling community. The
proprietor asks but to be triad, nd If not found worthy,
discarded. ,
January, 19 I860, 29-tf
c .; ! a
IJEMAHA LAND AGENT,
SL'RTEYOR & XOTAItT FCDT.IC,
VTillselect lands, investigate titles, pay taxes. &c,
fitherm Kansas or Nebraska; buy, sell, and enter
lands on commission; invest in town property, buyer
gell the saiue, and will always have on handcorrect
plats of townships counties. fcc. showinp alllandssub
ect to ent ry, and where desired will furnish partiesli v
Ing in the states with thesame.
Being the oldest settler In the county will In all
case be able to give full acd reliable information.
AddresA L.Cjte,eltherat Brownvilleor Nemaha
City. Xeh-aska Territory. 6m-42-v2
"The Nebraska Farmer.
1G PAGES QUARTO MONTHLY.
SUBSCRIBE FOR IT.
i'a tht only Journal devoted exclusively
to the Agricultural and Educational inte
rests of Xtbfasl'a, Kansas, Xcrthern
.Missouri and Southern Iowa.
Try it. -lc3L It.
Four Copies, 3 months for SI
Twenty Copies, 1 year $15
One Copy, 1 year SI
Address,
FURNAS & LYANNA,
SrotcnvWe, Ntbratka.
ran
MELVm MILLS.
NEMAHA CITY, NEBRASKA.
The proprietor returns tcarAs for the generous
patronage thusfar extended him, Bud hopes bj re
newed efiorta to mcritlncreased favors.
Farmers and Others
TTill do well to have their grain in as soon as possi
ble, as spring freshets will soon be upon us, when
more than likely it will te impossible to run the
mill for several weeks. , .
Ccinc Along Now!
Mcal and Flour of Superior Quality
Constantly on LTand.
We. will pay 75 cents cash for wheat.
Feb-22,18C)0. J. G. MELYIX.
Peru Chair Factory,
AND
The undersigned, having purchased the Chair and
Cabinet shop lately owned by T. II. Marshall, take '.his
method of informing the public that tbey are now pre
pared to Mil order for all kinds of furnituie,- such as
Chairs, tables, stands, bedstead, bureaus, safes, cribs,
crad te, lounges, etc. etc., either at wholesale or re
tail) as cheap as can be bought at any other establish
mrnt In the west. The best of coffin lumber and trim
n.ingg crnstantty on hand, which will enable us to fill
order for coffins at short notice.
VTe have attached to our shop a good Horse Power and
Tnru'ing Lathe, and we are prepared to do ar.y d"CKCTrp
tiouof turning from a Chair les nj! t a Sugar Mill.
Chairs and Furniture of all kinds repaired In tl. best
6tyle. . ,. .
X. Tt. Corn, Wheat, Flour, fry OJoods,Groceries. Lum
ber and produce of all kinds, Money not excepted, ta
ken in exchange for work or gjods. We hope by strict
attention to business to merit -1 share of public pxtron
ar. BEN KDICT &. BLISS.
Pern, Xcbraska, Xovcml;cr 21, IS&9. ;
AGRICULTURAL
I" rom t
gnculfurist.
e Americnn
illnts onFatteninpr Pork.
it is usual with many tarmers to put
this off until cold weather sets in. The
pigs run in the woods, the prairie, or the
road, picking: p a scanty living, and in
.November come to the pens lean and
hungry, when they ought to be fattened.
In our practice we keep rfcs in the sty
the year round. We find them quite too
valuable co laborers in the manufacture
of manure to allow them to waste "their
sweetness on the desert air." A pig, in
the Eastern States ia worth five dollars
alone, if you will give him the material
to work with, and plenty of food. But
possibly it may pay for a little time in
the Summer, to keep the sow and pigs
in a clover patch where grass is more
plenty than corn upon a farm. If this be
done, all of them intended for the butch
er by Christmas, should be shut up im
mediately, and be fed with all they can
eat. A squealing pig is worse for the
owner's pocket than for his ears. It is
much easier to make pork in September,
and October than in December and Jan
uary. No extra amount of food is wast
ed in keeping up the animal heat. It
all goes to fat apd muscle. Variety of
food is a matter of much importance in
fattening swine. At this season a great
er variety is easily commanded. The
garden, it it is a good one, yields a great
many refuse articles, squashes, beets,
carrots, apples, melons, tomatoes, and
corn, which will find a good market in
the sty. One of the best articles of food
for them is sweet corn, cut up by the
roots and fed whole. They are very fond
cf it, and it makes them thrive verj fast.
A half f ere rear the sty may b profi ta
lly cultivated ever' year eiprei.ly for
uas prpc-j. If this be not ou hand, corn
fr;-;-.i th3 field maybe f ed in the fame
way once a day. Iut swine need some
thing more than green stuff however
nutritious, to make them fatten.
The cooking of food is mu ch more ec
onomical than is generally supposed, es
p ecially upon the farm, where fuel costs
only the labor for procuring it. We think
about one third of the value of all the
grains usually fed to swme, is saved by
cooking. A boiler or box for steaming is
rj 3
indispensable in every well arranged
swill house. In this the meat may be
cooked and thoroughly mixed with the
roots and other vegetables. - The meal
absorbs large quantities of water, is
more highly relished by the pigs, and is
more perfectly digested. iNumerous ex
periments fully prove the economy of
cooking the food under ordinary circum
stances. Some claim that they can make
pork for less than three cents a pound in
this way. A datry farmer oi this btate
made one year 4,227 pounds of pork.
The feed with which he did it, was 4,127
pounds of corn and oat meal at SI, 50 a
hundred, 460 pounds of shorts at seventy
live cents, 147 bushels of potatoes at 16
cents, all of which were cooked, and half
an acre of green peas worth say SI 5 ;
making the total cost of feed S103 95,
or not quite two and a half cents per
pound for the pork. The value of the
whey and sour milk was not reckoned.
This, and the labor of feeding, with the
fuel for cooking, are very properly bal
anced against the the manure they made.
There can be no doubt that cooking the
food pays-well.
Adry warm place for sleeping is an
other important item in keeping swine
thrifty. They should have a good sty.
with roof and board floor, and plenty of
straw so that they can keep themselves
clean. With these conditions pork can
be made very fast, and the stye will be
found to pay as well as any part of the
farm arrangements.
Then, as to the fodder. It is very
slow work to top the stalks.one by one,
to gather up and bind and carry them by
hand to the wagon or cart at the outside
of the cornfield. ' And if they are left
on the ground until the crop is gathered,
they are worth no more for fodder than
the butts themselves.- Whereas, if gath
ered as we recommend, and cured under
cover or on poles in an airy loft, they
will remain succulent and sweet 'all' win
ter. It must be a very fastidious cow
that will not eat up every inch of such
stalks, if they are cut up with a straw
cutter and properly fed out. So. on a
review of our reasons, we shall still ad
here to the practice we have recommen
ded. Agriculturalist.
Cntting Corn Stalks.
Some larmers still adhere to the old
practice of topping their corn as soon as
the ears are glazed. They suppose that
the corn ripens better by exposure to the
sun, and that the tops so cut, make bet
ter fodder. We advocate the cutting up
the entire hill as soon as the kernals are
well glazed. This method saves labor,
yields as much and as good grain gives
the farmer more time to secure his crop,
and the stalks make better fodder
It is much easier to cut up the stalks
when green, than when ripe and dry.
A workman can grasp a whole hill with
one had and arm and cut it up with the
other with a single blow. But, in topping
each stalk must be cut separately, and
then in the final cutting up of the hills
tvhen dry. the labor is much greater.
At the North, frosts visit us soon after
the kernels are glazed, if not before ;
and after the leaves have been once sear
ed by frost, very little good can come to
the ears from the ascending sap. Now,
if the entire stalks are cut up just before
frosts come, and bound together' in large,
loose bundles, most of the leaves will re
main unhurt by frost, and will continue to
send down their acumulated food to the
grain. So that probably the ears become
fully as well developed as they would if
the stalks had been allowed to stand a few
days longer uncut. Besides it should be
remembered that all standing corn wastes
by being broken down, and eaten by
poultry, birds, etc.
Again : corn thus early cut up can be
housed in better season anl with less la
bor than if left standing in the field. It
is less liable to become m- ii dy, of to be
soaked by water. If the tanner wishes
to prepare his corn-field for a fall crop
say of wheat or rye it can be easier
and sooner cleaned by this method than
by any ether.
Bed-Bngs.
Although it may not be "polite" to
"talk" about Bugs, especially in portions
af the country," where, with ordinary
cleanliness, they are almost unknown;
yet, in this "Cottonwood Country," where
every person is more or less annoyed by
them, it will not be improper to publish
the following experience of a House
wife with these interesting creatures,
from the Agriculturist:
"Some say there is not a more provok
ing pest of the household, than the moth.
I will except bedbugs. I suppose it is
not polite to introduce such a subject, and
three months ago, if any one had men
tioned the creatures in my house, I should
have set him or her down for an ill-bred,
neglectful slattern for knowing anything
about them. "Bugs, indeed! no tidy
housekeeper was ever troubled with the
pest. They never darkened the sunshine
of my house such would have been my
thoughts. Alas, ende must have a fall.
and mine has experienced a severe one.
I was as happy a housekeeper, as com
fortable Circumstances, a contented diS'
position, an indulgent husband, good chil
dren, and a well kept house, could make
me ; but my time of trial came at length
in this wise
"See what a bargain I have brought
you," said my good man triumphantly, as
a cartman deposited at the door a hand
some finished bedstead, just purchased at
auction for-five dollars. I had always
been prejudiced, against second-hand fur
niture, believing the first wear of a thincr
the best, but this was of so neat a pat
tern and so very cheap I could not but
commend the purchase. It was forth
with placed in the children's room, who
rejoiced greatly in the change from the
the narrow bedstead they had outgrown,
and they inaugurated the change with a
high frolic when they first took possess
ion of its ample accommodations. I had
noticed some suspicious looking specks
about the joints, but took the precaution
of giving the pieces a thorough washing,
and thought no more of the matter. A
week or so after this, I was one morning
alarmed by a singular eruption' appear
ing upon the arms and necks of the chil
dren. I thought first of mosquito bites,
but it was too early in the season it was
certainly not fleas nor measles, what
cruld it be? That evening the mystery
was solved. Shortly after the cnildren
had retired to their room I heard little
Mary exclaim, "O, sister ! see this dear
little tiny turtle, running all round on my
pillow, where did he come from ?" I went
in hastily, and looked. Ugh ! The bed
was swarming with bugs ! I removed
the clothes, searched diliigently through
every hiding place, exterminated all that
I could find, put the children to bed, and
then went to my own room, and had a
good crying spell.
The next morning I proposed to split
the vile bedstead and its contents into
kindling wood,, but husband objected.
Til get you some Lyon's Powder," he
said, "and you can soon rout them out."
Unwilling to lose the price of the bed
stead, I consented, and the infallible
powder was speedily applied to every crev
ice and crack where a varmint could hide
There was no trouble that night, and I
praised the powder that had brought re
lief, liut the next day, as I sat sewing,
I felt something upon my neck, and al
most screamed as I laid my finger upon
one of the execrable insects. Upon ex
amination I found that they had left the
bed, apparently from dislike of the pow
der, and were secreted in the cracks of
the floor and wall. "Try Costar's exter
minator," said my husband, when I re-
partcd the progress the bugs had made.
We did try "Costar's" apparently a
mixture of turpentine and some ether in
gredients. If we could gtt a drop upon
them, the bugs were killed, otherwise
they still bade us defiance. Next, a man
intented a bellows that was to puff his
preparations into the cracks and upon the
insects. c tried that, but they cared
little for the puffs. ;
"We'll suflocate them, ' raid I. And
all their harboring places, thoroughly,
and they will trouble you no more.
Hou-ins Cattle
An English experimenter, last autumn,
tied up four bullocks under a hovel, in
separate boxes, and kept three in one
box, and left seven loose in two yards,
four in one and three in ihe other, each
having a hovel or shed to run under.
The fourteen heasts were alL alike in
age, and were treated in the same way,
namely: eight pounds of linseed cake
each, per day, three-quarters of a bushel
of mangold wurtzels, and hay end oat
straw distributed equally to all. Those
shut up in the boxes, and those tied up,
were all ready for market fiist, and those
fed in the yards replaced them in the
boxes, but when they came to be market
ed, it was found that they were not rea
dy bya month as early as those that were
tied or fastened up.
Weight or Hay for Sheep.
The question is often asked, Hew
much hay do sheep or cattle require per
day ? In reference to sheep of a given
size, this question is well answered in a
letter of the noted sheep-breeder Alex
ander Speck .Von Sternburg, of Lutz
schen, Saxony, to Hon. Jos. A. Wright,
American Minister to Berlin. He says:
"One thirtieth 'part of the weight ct the
live animal in good hay is considered
necessary, per day, for its sustenance. Ac
cording to the quality of the fodder, and
its abundance or scarcity, this may be in
creased to one-twentieth part: but less
than one-thirtieth part ought not to be
given. 1 aking good meadow hay as the !
fodder standard, a ram should receive
abou 3 1-4 lbs. per day, a ewe about 2 3-4
lbs. per day, yearlings, &c.. in that pro
portiontaking the average of a full
grown ram at 110 lbs., o a ewe at 82
lbs., the weight of each varying, accord
ini t. ae, size and condition, between
105 and 125 lbs. as regards the full-grown
rams, and irom tO to bo lbs. as regard
the ewes. The weight of a wether varie
between SO lbs. in lean condition aud 110
to 115 lbs. if strong and fat for the
butcher. One pound of good meadow
hay is considerea equivalent to one and
two-thirds pounds of oat, pe-a, wheat, or
barley straw, four pounds of turnips, or
two pounds of grains in the wet state, as
daily delivered from the brewery in win
ter. When the time for stabling for
winter arrives, the sheep-master has his
supplies of straw,, hay and turnips, al
lotted to him on the basis of the above
calculation, and he is bound to make them
serve out the proper time, under feeding
being as much guarded against as over
feeding and waste."
upon the free use cf the Irtish. Begin
at the head, and pass the ccmb lightly up
and down until the dandruff is all loosen
ed, remove it with the brush. Be par
ticular around the edges of the fore-top
and the maue. It is a good plan to sponge
off the head and ears using but. little
water, smoothing tte hair down to its
natural position. In going over the back,
quarters, loins, etc., us a the ccmb iu one
hand and the brush in the other, working
lightly and - quickly. Take much paius
where the skin lies in folds, as at the
union of the legs with the body let every
part be made thoroughly free from dand
ruff. Finish by rubbing down vigorously
with wi.7 of straw, until the hair "shines
like a bottle" an extra smoothing touch,
may be put on with a woollen-cloth. Do
not fear all this trouble ; it will be more
than repaid in the extra looks and spirit
of the horse. Cor. Am. Agricul.
Grooming a Horse.
"What do you give your horses to keep
them in such fine condition ? said a
young tarmer to nis neignoor, wnose
team of bays was the pride ot their owner,
and the admiration of the village
"Oats, carrots and a plenty of brush,''''
was the reply,
There is littie need of insisting on the
necessity of good food, and plenty of it,
to have a horse remain vigorous. Every
one knows that bone, smew and muscle
are manufactured from hay, oats, corn,
etc., and that the raw material must be
supplied to produce the strong limb,
elastic step, and noble spirit, which make
a fine horse the universal favorite he is.
But the important part which the skin
bears in the animal economy, and the
necessity of properly cleansing and keep
ing it ia healthy condition, are not fully
appreciated. Hough staring coats, 'grease'
or 'scratches,' inflammations, and a whole
catalogue of diseases find their origin in
neglect of proper groor.nng.
The skin cf the horse, like that of
other animals, not only affords protection
to the parts within, but by the pores affords
protection to the parts within, but by the
pores affords an outlet to a large part of
the waste of the body. In outdoor life,
the natural state of the horse, this mem
brane becomes thickened and tough.
capable of resisting changes of tempera
ture ; and by continual exercise, the pores
are kept open, giving free exit to all the
exhalations. But this alone will not give
the smooth flossy coat which adds so
reatly to the animal's beauty. Confin-
ng the hore to the stable, as is general
y done for at least part of the vear,
renders his skin tender, especially when
is is kept warmly blanketed. Expose
him now to great change of temperature;
akc him out and drive him till heated.
return to the stable, and let hini stand
uncarred for over night, even for an hour,
the sensatire skin is rapidly chilled by
the evaporation of the sweat, the pores
are suddenly closed, and often a cold, a
rheumatic stiffness or other disorder re
sults. Proper grooming prevents this,
by toughening the skin, keeps it in healthy
action, equalizing the circulation, remov-
a roll of sulphur was procured, placed ia ling obstruction frcrn the pores, and what
a secure vessel, set on fire in the roam, lis of great importance, by. routing the
and the doors and windows closed tight- action of the muscles at the surface, in
Iy. It took more than a week to set some manner compensates for the want
nd of the smell of sulphur, bat the bugs ot exercise consequent upon stable life.
were not to be smoked out. ! Currying and brushing should not be
Finally, I hit it. With sixpence worth done in the stable; the dust and scurf
Will it ray to Baiia a Barn.
This queticn is often asked among
farmers, and we think it should be as
certained whether it will payor not. We
will give 'our experience, and some ob
servations upon the subject. Men, who
have not a barn, will say: "We can get
a Machine that will thrash cur grain and
ciean it an at once ; and our barn will be
of little use to us nine months out of the
year." Now, what does this. lead to?
Just as soon as harvest is over, every
machine? in the country is running over
with business; threshing and hauling to "
mill is the order of the day ; prices run ',
down to the lowest point. Then, when
they can't stand the price any longer,
they coax the millers to take it in on re
ceipt, for their grain is stacked out, and
probably spoiling. It mxist be thrashed
out, and they have no barn to put it in.
The millers generally .have a limited
time set when they must sell their re
ceipted wheat. Now the farmer who
cannot see how they manage to keep tho
price down till the time expires that they
have to sell their receipted wheat, is very
far from being posted. And it is no ad
vantage to the consumer to have the trade
thrown so entirely into the hands of the
miller.
Now we would say, never put a bushel
of wheat in a mil! or receipt either sell
or keep it at home. You rtrn the doable
risk of fire and the miller failing in
either case you could get nothing.. Be
sides, we think this is not half of the loss;
for when grain has to be stacked, it is
often hauled out into the woods, where
the straw will be out of the way; or, if
not, it is stacked probably in the middle
of the field, and, as soon as it is threshed,
the straw is burnt.
Now, when a man has no barn it is
difficult to convert his straw into manure,
or use it for his stock in winter, as hi
could do, if he had a barn. It is weil
known that where several hundred bush
els of grain are threshed, and "the straw
all put in one pile, it will take several
years for it to rot, and even then it will
scarcely make the ground rich it is piled
upon. It wastes about as fast as it rots.
. I bought a place about ten years ago.
myself, that had no barn on it. I put in
but little small grain, because I had no
place to put it. Five years since, I built
a barn fifty-six by forty feet. One cf my
neighbors said I never could fill it. I
told him if I did not soon fill it I would
leave the farm. The first year, I had
six hundred bushels of wheaMo put in it.
Two years ago I had all the mows full,
and piled enough cn the barn floor to make
two hundred bushels more
Before I Luilt my barn I made a dozen
or so loads of manure; now, I can man
ure from eicrht to ten acres every fall.
I honestly believe that my barn has paid
for itself, or that I have made enough
more than I could have made without ir,
and in this way by keeping grain when
t was low priced, till it was higher; mak
ing more manure; saring fodder, etc.
The Origin
or Yankee Clock
3Iak-
Yankee clock making was commence!
by Mr. Elia3. Terry, of Plymouth, Con
necticut in lMo. The wheels were
whittled out with a knife. The running
was regulated by a bag of sand. Mr.
Terry used to complete two clocks, and .
start off cn horseback to peddle them out.
He seen introducee brass movements,
melting up old kettles since brass was
scarce. Hen Chancey Jerome cemmene-
ed the business in 1623. In 1520 a. wood
en cloch Jost eleven dollars; now a much
better dock costs SI 50. The people .
laughed at Mr. Terry fcr making L"jO
clocks at once; during the last year the
New Haven Clock Cempacy made 270
000 finished movements.
- ti i i . i . i r
oi corrosive suonmate aissoivea m wms-
key or rum, I went carefully over and in
to every lurking place of the pests, ap
plying it pretty liberally with the feather
end of a c. mil, and ifter repeating a
4ose a few li.nes at internals of two
or three weeks, I have conquered: a
peace, and happiness has returned to our
dwelling. '
Conclusion If you are annoyed with
bed buzi a prlv corrosive sublimate! to
will be scattered in the manger to mix
with the horse feed, besides keeping the
stable uncleanly Take the animal into
the open air, tie him securely, and handle
him so gently that he will enjoy, rather
than dread, the application of the comb
and brush. A sharp currycomb, roughly
scraped over the tender skin, is anything
but pleasant, as the shrinking and resist
ing animal will soon show. Apply this
instrument lightly, and depend mainly
We are informed on the best authority,
that there is a peach orchard oh the East
ern shore of Maryland, that contains COO
acres; the nett profit of which was, last
year, 810,000, and that the owner was
offered SGO.OOO for the crop of this year,
the purchaser to pick up the fruit and take
it to market. Garden Mmihbj.
The Chicago Times and Herald says
that an idea of the amount cf ground ia
wheat may be gathered from the state
ment of a responsible gentleman of
Jaynesville, who says that with the assist
ance of a spy-glass, he saw one hundred
and forty-six reapers at work at one time.
This is on the line of the Chicago and
North-western railroad.
Tno present pnpu!tJn cf Cuba i omatedtal
l.lStf.ChO. .f which 3;D.80O are white I30,CC fr
colered, 40,fi(;0 slaves an l .".S.OflO A.-i.atica anJIadi
ans. , Twcutjr-tbreap!autiiwU4 on tho Inland i9
va!ucl at f 1 5.000,000. 1