Nebraska advertiser. (Brownville, Nemaha County, N.T. [Neb.]) 1856-1882, October 21, 1858, Image 1

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DEVOTED TO AHT, SCIENCE, AGKICULTDRE, COMMERCE, NEWS, POLITICS, GENERAL INTELLIGENCE . AND THE INTERESTS , OF .-. NEBRASKA.
CITY OF BKOWNVILLE, NEMAHA GOIJNTY, N. T.,; THURSDAY, OCTOBEE 21, 1858.
NO. 171
VOL. III.
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Nebraska Cluucrtisct
ri BLlsniD EVEET THCRSDAY BT
R. W. FUUNAS,
ScfoadStory Hoadley &' Muir's Building,
' (Corner of Main and First Streets.)
BHOWNVIILENl .
...:.! i. ,1va.nee. - $2,00
Toroneje.rw P.. --. - '6 monltg. 2,50
4
4
1J " 3,00
nVof 12 or more win o i"'u",u7 v ' i "
no"di cash accompany, the order,
not otherwise.
... l . r ; l, m.A at tl50 ner
RA.TES OF ADVERTISING :
On.nar.U0 UncsDrU)on. insertion,
r.aeh additional insertion,
$1,00
0,50
2,50
One vvt, one monva,
three months,
4,00
6,00
M "
six months,
12,00
5,00
60,00
35,00
20,00
16,00
20,00
10,00
8,00
20,00
13,00
10,00
6,00
m one year,
na.ineu Cards of six lines or less,one jear,
Doe Column one year,
One-half Column, one year,
fourth " 4
- eighth " ,
- Column, six months,
m fc.if Column.six months,
fourth "
41
44
44
44
ju rinmn three months,
- half Column, three months,
.11
fourth "
44
(
44
JAnnoancinffcanaiaaiesiorouiovi-
ChTfirance will required for all advertise
cnents except where actual responsibility is known.
Tender cent for each change will be.added to the
"o a?vertisement will be considered by the year,
unless specified on the manuscript, or previously
rreed upon between the parties.
Adrertisements not marked on thecopy foraspee
tfied number of insertions, will be continued until
ordered out, and charged accordingly
Ailadrertisementsfromitrangersortransientper-
40ns, to be raid in advance.
. The pririlcgsof yearly advertisers willbeeonnn
d ridredly to their own business;and all aivertise
mnti noi pertiining thereto, to be paid for ex-
Vearly advertisers bare the privilegcof changing
their ad vertisemenU quarterly. ....
All leaded advertisements charged double the
above rates. ... ... v
Advertisements on the inside exclusively will be
charged extra.
JOB PRINTING!
... . -r ir : o1ra.nf 5.00
Caving added to the Advertiser Office Card and
Jab Tresses, New Type of the latest styles, Inks of
all colores,Bronies, t ine Taper, Envelopes, Ac; we
are now prepared to execute Job Work of every de
scription in a style unsurpassed by any other office
id the United States.
Particular attention will be given to orders from
Alistance in having them promptly attended to.
The Proprietors, having had an extensive expe
rience, 'will give their personal attention to this
branch of business, and hope, in their endeavors to
.tIease, both in the excellence of their work, and
reasonable charges to receive a share of the public
jatr'n aee.
BUSINESS CARDS.
MISS MARY TURNER,
r.'ilLLUIER A!1D DRESS MAKER.
Main Street, one door above Carsons Bank,
BROWNVILLE, N. T.
'Bounds and Trimmings altcavs on hand.
KJ
XT. C. JOHNSON,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY
AND
rRcal Estate Agent,
BROWNVILLE, N. T.
REFERENCES.
Ion.Wm.Jessup, Montrose, Pa.
Jl. S. Bentlv, " "
John C. Miller, Chicago, III. (
. Wm. K. McAllister, M "
. Charles F. Fowler, " "
R. W. Furnas, Brownville, X.T.
O. F. Lake, " 44
May 7, 1857. 47-ly
KEW PAINT SHOP.
The nndemlgned begs leave to Inform the citizens of
this plac and vicinity that be bat started a new Paint
tUiup la Browaville, and will attend to all work iu the
Painting Department, that be may be favored with.
HOUSE, SIGN, SCENIC,
33V.TJT"X2XL -MINTED
ORXA3IEXTAL PAIA TIXC ;
. GRAINING, GILDING,
AND
PAPER HAHGIKG,
Imitator of all Kinds of
WOODS XJtD MARBLES,
Instruction given Ic the
GRECIAN OIL, CRAYON,
ORIENTAL, OR GLASS PAINTING,
On reasonable terms.
Carriages painted neatly and with dispatch.
lin ing bad a number of year' pratteal experience in
, ,oiue of the largest Kwtern cities, he challenges com
tetitioB west of the Mississippi, and feels confident that
tie can give perfect satisfaction to all that may favor him
ith their patronage. Call and see for youselves, that
-Tint know can penorm an ii advertises.
v CHARLES R. MANNING
Brownville, Sept. 16, 185-ni
UVER BENNET. WX. B. OAERIT.
"AHE8 r. FISKR. ACCCSTV8 KNIGHT.
OLIVER BENNETT & CO.,
Manufacturcrfand WhalesaleDcalersin
BOOTS AND SHOES,
jno. 7 main Street.
Foimblt,Xo.101,CoknrofMaix avpQCUst.)
ST. LOUIS, tUQ.
E. LIATHIEU,
Cabinet & 7agon-Haker
ilain Street, bet. Sixth and Seventh.
miowx YILTA IV. T. 1
'1 kind of cabinet work neatly executed,
f-.ieyiirius of wjs-'us' plows, etc., promptly done
S U Vv y-tS'l
DANIEL L. McGARY,
ftTTBMJCY AT LH,
SOLICITOR IX CIIAXCERY.
Brownville, Nebraska.
Will practice in the Courts of Nebraka,and Xorth
west Missouri.
VAssrs. Crow, acureary vo., sjw. m,
Hon. James M. Hutrhii,
Hon. John R. Shcply,
Hon. James CraiR,
Do
, Do
St. Joseph, Mo.
Do
Nebraska City, N. T.
Do.
non. Silus w oodson,
Judge A. A. Bradord,
S. F. Nuckolls, Esq.,
T. E. HAYCOOK.
Attrney at Law
REAL ESTATE AGENT.
Mount Vernon, Neraalia Co.,
Particular attention paid to the practice of law and col
lection of debts in the counties or aemu, lauw,
Sohnson, and Richardson, Nebraska Territory.
Real estate bought and sold on commission. Land
warrauts located for distant dealrrs. Pre-emption
papers carefully prepared.
REFERS TO
Sam.n. Elbert, Plattsiuouth.N. T.
II P Bennet, Nebraska city, N T
O D Richardson, Omaha ciiy, N' T
Fenner Ferguson, JIC, Bellevue, NT
Cassady 4t Test, Bankers, Council Bluff, Iowa
Cook, Sergeant &. Cook, Fort Desmoines, Iowa.
December 3, 1857 i23!y
R. L. DODGE,
ATTORNEY ATLAW
SOLICITOR IND CHANCERY,
BIlOlVmLLG, IV'EBRASIiA.
Land Warrants bought and sold. Pre-emption papers
carefully mid correctly prepared.
OFFICE on Main street, in Brown and Benneit'8 Bank-
ins House.
REFERENCES
Hon. Fenner Ferguson, Bellevue, Nebraska.
" R. W. Furnas Brownville, "
" R. Brown " "
Kinney &. Holley Nebraska City
Hon. James Craig, St. Joseph Mo.
Nave, McCord &. Co. "
Clark &. Conrad, "
July 8, !SJi8-v3n2-Iy
NEW GROCERY
PROVISION HOUSE,
BY
J. II. MORRISON,
AT TIIE
Old Stand. of M. P. CLARK,
BROWNVILLE, N.
Vhere can be found a full siif.ply of Family Groceries
Ham and Bacon, M.ickrel and Cod Fih, Teas, Sugar,
Coffee. Caudies, N uts, ine Crackers and Cheese, Liquors
and Wines, Sardines, Ci?ars and Tobacco, Oysters and
Lobsters, Peaches, Prunes, Blackberries- and Wnortle
berries, and all articles usually kept in a Fancy Grocery
Store, which he will gel 1 for cash or produce as cheap as the
cheapast. Will you give me a share of your contiuuod
patronage.
Brownuille, July 15th, 1358. 3n3
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
BKOtYNVTUE, N. T.
Will write deeds of every kind and contracts for every
purpose, with warranted legal accuracy.
Office, in the Banking House of Lushbaugu &. Carson.
REFER TO
Hon. John A. Bingham, Cadiz, Ohio.
" W K Carter, Cleveland, "
" RP Spalding, " "
" B F Lciter, Car. ton, "
" SLahm, " "
" Win R Sapp. Mt. Vern.n, "
" S P Chase, Columbus,
" Thou. Ford, Mansfield, ? "
" Jas. Craig. St.' Joseph, Mo.
Brownville, Oct. 22d, 'c7. v2nl7-ly
O. B. HEWETT,
ATTORNEY AT UW
REAL ESTATE AGENT,
BroAvnTille, Nebraska.
Will attend to business iu all departments of his pro
fession. Pre-emptors Rights Secured.
Land Warrants for Sale.
Office on First St., bet. Main and Water.
REFERREVCES :
Kinney & Holley, Nebraska City.
Cheever Sweet & Co., do
J. Sterlinp Morton do
Brown &. Bennett, Brownville
R. VT. Fursas do
Brownville, N. T. ilay 13, 1S5S. v2n46tf
NEMAHA LAUD AGENT,
SURVEYOR & ROTARY PUBLIC,
"Will select lands, Investigate titles, pay taxes, 4tc
either in Kansas or Nebraska; buy, sell, and enter
lands on commission; invest in town property, buy or
sell the same, and will always have on hand correct
plats of townships, counties, Ux., showing all lands sub-
lecito entry, and where des-ired will furnish parties hv
injt in the states with the same.
Being the oldest settler in the county will in all
cases be able to give full and reliable information.
Auuress A. L. Coate. either at Brownville or Nemaha
City, Nebraska Territory. 6m-42-v2
T. W. BEDFORD.
County Surveyor
HCDSON GEORGE,
Notary Public
BEDFORD & GEORGE
S1KY11 11 cm
ALSO
REAL ESTATE A'GEHTS
BROWNVILLE NEBRASKA.
Office on Main Street.
"WILL attend promptly to all business entrusted to
them in the line of their profession. Will buy and sell
Land warrants, make time entries, attend to the selec
tion and location of Government Lands, hurvcy Town
sites, subdivide Lands, make out City Plats. ic,
Ilaving been located in the Territory for the patt year,
we are prepared to make the most choice selections for
actual settlors. Will pay taxes, investigate titles, and
render assistance in contested caej at the U. S. Land
Office. -Letters
of Inquiry promptly answered.
WE REFER TO
Hon. T C Reynolds, Kingston, Penn.
John J Pendleton, Esq. Cincinnati, Ohio "
Hon Galutia A. Grow Washington City, D. C
Hon Joseph G. Crane Dayton. Ohio
Ryall & Charles, Land Agents, Sioux City, Iowa.
Boster fit Hedges, Bankers do do
Luhbauph& Carson, Bunkers rownville, N. T. -R.
AV. Furnas, Etc. do do
D. W, C. Cleav er, Geological Engineer, Scranton, Pa.
RufuoR. Edwards, Esq. St. Joseph Mo.
Col. John G. Fell Waverley Pa.
W. G. George, Real Estate Agent, Daytou Ohio
April 8. 1S8 v2n41-yly '
LOUIS WALDTEB,
Sfen, and 0rnan.pr.tal Painter,
GIiAZXEB, GRATfEB,
Hocsc,
AND
PAPER II A S G E R ,
33ROWITVII.I.E. If. T.
raesthls method of informing tle public tikt hehas
removed his paint shop from emah City to Uiis place
lie thinks himself qualified to undertake any work per
taining to his line of business, and respectfully invites
the public to give him a call.
Please leave ordersal tLe "Advertiser" cfllce." " ,
Jfuv. 19, 1S57. ' v?AAt
Miscellaneons.
In compliance with request we repub-
hsh the foUowing, paraphrase on the old
familiar lines entitled "The House' that
Jack Built:" ; .' .
Tho Dnmlrilf Frorfoil hv Inhn
TRANSLATED
FROM THE VULGATE OF MOTHER
GOOSE.
Behold the mansion reared by daxlal Jack.
See the malt stirred in many a plethoric sack,
In the proud cirque of I van's bivouac.
, Mark how the rats' felonious fangs invade
The golden store in John's pavilion laid.
Anon, with velvet foot and Tarquin strides.
Subtle Grimalkin to his quarry glides,
Grimalkin grim, that slew the fierce rodent,
Whose tooth insidious Johan's sackcloth rent I
Lol now the deep-mouthed canine foe's assault,
That vexed the avenger of the stolen malt,"
Stored in the hallowed precincts of that hall
Which rose complete at John's creative call.
nere stilks the impetuous cow with crumpled horn,
Whereon the exacerbating hounds were torn,
who bayed the feline slaughter-beast, that slew
The rat predacious, whose keen fangs ran through
The textile fibres that involved the grain
Which lay in Han's inviolate domain.
Here walks forlorn the damsal crowned with rue,
Lacitif erions spoils from vaccine, dugs! who drew.
Of that corniculate beaste whose tortuous horn
Tossed to the clouds in fierce vindictive scorn,
The harrying hound, whose braggart bark and stir
Arched the lithe spine and reared the indignant fur '
Of Puss, that with vermicidial claw,
Struck the weird rat in whose insatiate maw,
Lay reeking malt that erst in Juan's courts we saw.
Robed in senescent garb that seems in sooth
Too long a prey to Chronos' iron tooth,
Behold the man whose amorous lips incline.
Full with young Eros' osculative sign,
To the Morn maiden, whose lac-albin hands '
Drew albu-lactic wealth from lacteal glands
Of that immortal bovine, by whose horn
Distort, to rr aim ethereal was borne
The beast catulean, vcxer of that sly
Ulysses quadrupedal, who made die
The old audacious rat that dared devonr
Antecedaneous Ale in John's domestic bower.
Lo, here, with hirsute honors doffed succinct
Of Baponacious locks, the Priest who linked
In Hymen's golden bands the torn unthfif t, ,
Whose means exigious stared from many a rift .
Even as he kissed the virgin all forlorn,
Who milked thecow with implicated horn, '
Who in fine wrath the canine torturer skied, .
That dared to vex the insidious muricide,
who let auroral effluence through the pelt
Of the sly rat that robbed the palace John had built.
The loud cantankerous Shanghae comes at last,
Whose shouies arouse the shorn ecclesiast
Who sealed the vows of Hymen's sacrament.
To him, who robed in garments indigent,
Exosculates the damsel lachrymose,
The emulgator of that honored brute morose.
That tossed the dog, that worried the cat, that kilt
The rat that eat the malt that lay in the house that
John had built.
The Ocean Invasion.
At a mpptintr of the tenants of the
deep, held off Cape Breton, yesterday
afternoon, reports the Boston Gazette,
the Prince of Whales was chosen Presi
dent, who stated the object of the meet
ing to be to decide upon the merits of
the Atlantic Cable, its probable infring-
ment ypon the rights of original settlers,
and generally to consider what it all
meant. Suddenly, he said, they found
this cable thrust downamonr them, which
was calculated to deceive the smaller frv.
as they deemed that it was something to
eat. ne nimseir nao ruooeo nis nose
against it, but he could make no impres-
nake no impres-
little matter but
X as ooenina
sion upon it. It was a
still it was to be looked at
A O
lrouim meir aomam, anu ne wisneo
for a free expression of the opinion of
- w . - i .
nnripfD.ii ihnt
although they were fish, they would not
v f , mntlo, if
.-ix.iuvvu, iuoi,
SLdlV uwiil iuc iuuiii , uuu il ituy"
tlnnrr ivn? sntisfaptorv. hp. tor onp won d
O " w j ,
say let it slide.
Ti,,m ri Pen wnt nnp thnf had
been deceived by "the line, and had, in
his-efforts to bite it, broken out several of
his front teeth. fA voice in the crowd
.v a. .;,.c Qf cm
UO IU UCllUSliS uuu &tl ooic iJCVV
Vtt fria npppn
T Sharb Fsn.. of the detective force.
said that chasing a delinquent mullet, he
came in contact with the line, and receiv-
ed a severe injury in the his head. He
hofro-od t0 r.omnanv tn look at the wound,
V kll J VVtMj - ,
He removed a large piece of kelp and re
vealed a deep mark over his right eye.j
lie confessed that he had been staggar
r 1 V.. .V. VI 1 1- IP tha inmTM
nv lda.nvh.duininrpd in that 4v.
j0, . cL.,i,J p Mnrinp,
doMiTTi v4 crtic
rrht h w 1,0.1 Ti,n Annn; nf ih
main had been invaded, and he, for one,
was ready to throw away his scabbard;
and saw off the cable.
King Fish, Esq., -took the same view
as his military friend, and went in for
ruttinfT nfT.
r - " - -
TVfr TTnrcP TifrAarpl thnntrhl thpr .roe
cause to suspect anything in this line that
,. A .u a c
part he thought all respectable fish should
1 1 f-" r 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 in 11 t-t" 1 ' r ' t' 1 11 1 111 a 111 1 1 iv
raise tneir tongues and sounds against
the invasion.
Jola Pornoise. Eso.. rose to sneak.
when every fin ceased to vibrate, and
universal smile snrpnd over the audience,
TTn snid hp had nnt mniP tn mnlo anw
speech, but he was of the opinion that he
might say something, as he usually did
when he spoke. . He was for introducing
pacific measures, even though he was in
the Atlantic. TLaughter.! He was not
one that belieyed that the line was going
w
to anect any fish who was not a chowder-
head. f Hear, hear.! If fish would
1 .
confine themselves simply to cold water,
nnM nnd rharrrp thpm to the commnv. 1
He heard this suggestion, and perhaps sir," to an assurance on the part of his teemed the: mechanic throws the ham
should profit by it, but his feelings were excited customer, that he wauld "drap in mer with increased power, and shoves the
outraged by the deception. . arter the dog ina half hour." : plane with a dextrous hand the mer-
there would be no danger;. For his part,
he was disposed to blow for the new, line,
tr'n3'' ' Mh V 'I'Vo
rather than t0 take any part in the busi.
ness of the meeting, but he and his com-
panion, Mr. Bluefish, from a summer visit
t0 the glades tad learned to . respct Yan-
vv p,wwuu, " . j v-
1 'if ; 1 t ".' I
terpnsmg class or ammais naa anytmng
to do with the present mysterioui arrange-
ment, hewould oppose it becausetit would
do no good. It was bound to go,4
Mr. Bluefish responded, "That's so.!"
and a young Tautog, whose ancester had .frightful face appeared behind some im
f alien at Compton, wiped away a -briny mense lars, and a hoarse voice exclaim
tear, as he endorsed the response. ; .
Mr. Deepsea . Cod didn't see much
cause for uneasiness, although he could
not feel a direct interest in the matter, as,
ixiauno iu ocm,c, uc naa wuw inaaici ui
a little lie of his own, in which his inter-
est was concentrated. The crv . of "Liv-
er, . nenaa just neard in tne crowd, did
not affect him.. He threw back the im-
putauon, and would say mat tnrougn nis
liver many human lights had been1 saved
from going fout. lie was a philanthro-
pist, and was willing to sacrifice himself
so long as it would pay. -
Mr. Big Blackfish did cot apprehend
much trouble from it, only he was oppos-
ed to all. innovations. He didn't believe
in any new f angled notions at all, and he 1
thought that by consenting to let .the ca-
ble remain, they were encouraging the
vagaries of the fish but of the :water. He
would move the passage of the following
rrsolution:
Resolved, That the long line across our
- - 1
territory is an infringement, and should
not De auowea.
inis resolution was aiscussea Dy me
Messrs. Cod, Haddock and Dolphin, and
others, chiefly in' the opposition, when the
resolution was lost.
It was then voted that the cable be al
lowed to remain, and the proceedings or
dered to be published in the Gazette, to
be furnished through the cable ; a batte
ry of electric eels having volunteered
their services for the occasion. ; ; .
After thanking the President for the
polite and , impartial manner in whichhe
had discharged his duties, tne meeting
dissolved in deep water.-
A Dog
DlOrj. . '
The following, amusing scene took
place in the Telegraph omce at. Torts-
mouth Ohio:
While the operator was explaining the
modus' operahdi of applying the galvanic
current to the transmission of intelligence
between distant places, a tall and partic
ularly ungainly .specimen of the ' genus
homo, stalked into the office. He was a
tall, muscular, brawny fellow of the spe
cies Pike, and to judge from his brusque
manners and uncouth appearance, had
always dwelt on the rrotier, or some
whprA npar snndnwn. nutsidfi thp nalp. of
nVili'yntinn hp shnwpd svmntnms nf ran-
w. , j j i
id walk, and hastily inquired :
"Telegraph office, eh?" .
"It is, sir, - replied the operator, po
litely.: . '
"Runs from here to Dayton?7' ,-
(iVoe " .
'Good! I've got a rite smart job fur
ve, I left thar afore sun up this morning,
in sich a alfired splutter, I clean forgot
'y ug Ul U1C WVC111, AAC a
powerful good dog stranger, I tell you,
powerrui gooa aog, stranger, x icu yuu,
a cross 'twixi a Newfoundland and a reg-
ular bull smarras a '.mountain cat, and
a hlll3 uai wu
his hettin wildcats and a nan-grown pan-
.11 .1 j-. 7 ; ,vnrih
i i rinr inriiwii in KHrv udv. an la nvuu
.-- - . . .
any money to hunt lnjms, an' that's just
LvhnrT'ma crwin. an' I want vou to tele,
"- 6 J
STapn mm down nur m OOUDie uuitK me-
1 - . .
ter, for the steamboat is a gwin to leave
in an hour, an' I wouldn loose that do?
fur a heap." . ".' .
e ooservea a comicai exurcb&iuu mi
over the operator's countenance asie pre-
tpndpd tn nntP down a descnntion ot the
I .v-n . , 7 . ,
musinnr nnimn .and answerea. "ail rifrni
When he returned the first obiect that
.
attracted his attention was a stub-tailed
pup of the most diminutive proportions
which was tied to the operator's table,
and saluted him as he entered with a
and cnlntpd him as hp. entered with a
shrill how! rvow! wow! . :.
'You are just in time, sir, here js the
doo- all n TC Onlv a little out of
breath, owing to the rapidity of his jour
nev. said the operator.
w h ; t ? ormrra t pd Pikp. strikinrr
Un aitihJ. f nmrPivP flonimpnt.
whih o tnn nroo-nant for word. . .
"Here sir, tied to the table."
"What! that teeny spririglin' "fizzled
up har my doe? - You do inotme'an to
say that dod dearned, short legged, little
squint eved. lop eared, mangy beast is
mvdnnr? AfinP i5 thft hpst dorr in Ore-
ww. ,aiaiuv rt
n-nn aUAnin W sjnlpndid animal.
a regular beauty a two hundred poun-
v 1 c 1, ?' a tV,ic
1 iimt ir 1 11 u-ii' 1-111 a. rr- a. lu a j
point the speaker having exhausted his
vocabulary, stopped to oreame.
"Very singular, extraordinary singu-
lar.I mav sav. Has your ; correspondent
a made s mistake and forwarded the wrong
animal V1 '1
" Ari?!nkft hp Clisscd ! ItJS a TCglar SWin-
die, sir. That blasted .tavern-keeper up
thar has stole my aog, ana sent me- mis
jnfernal little runt in his place.
What'
the damage f
"Nothing, as you have failed to get the
1 - ; r
rinu dog'. ,. . .
Pike left the office swearing he : was
going to Dayton to stalp' that dod-rotted,
J do:
stealing tavern-keeper.
..Solomon De Caus. who was shut ud
tor his supposed insanity, in the Bicetre,
a.1 PaFisv ms to have been the first to
moving carriages on land, as well as ships
at-sea. ' Marion de Lorme, in a letter to
the 3Iarquis de Cinq-Mars,' dated Pan'3,
February, 1641, thus describes a visit to
uiig viicuiaicu ujau-uujjse ill liic CUHlya-
... .
ny ot tne - English xMarquis of Worces-
ter: . , ' . . i
-;" We were; crossing the court, and I,
more dead than alive with fnVht. kept
close fo mv companion's side, whpn a
ed : . . - ; ; .
"I am tiot mad ! I am not mad ! I have
made a discoverv that would PnnVh th
country that adopted it.".
"vnai nas- ne uiscovereu. asked our
guide. ; -
Oh!' answered thp k
nngr his shoulders: 'somethin?? triflino-
enough; you would never jruess it: it's the
use of the steam of boilin water.'
began ta laugh. 'This man,' continued
the keeper, 'is named Solomon de Caus;
he came from Normandy four years ao-o,
to present to the Kine a statement of the
effects that raiirht be produced from his
invention. To listen to him, vou would
imagine that with steam vou could navi-
gate ships, move carriages, in fact, there
iS no end to the miracles which he insists
could be performed. The Cardinal sent
the madman awav without list Pninnr tn
him. Solomon, far from beins- discour
jured. followed the Cardinal
Went, with determined perseverance, who
O " ' T ' -.w
tired of finding him forever in his path.
and annoved at, h s fn v. shut him
up
m the Bicetre. "
Jim had read the well-known story of
George Washington's love of truth, and
the- father's love of the noble principles
of his son, so well manifested on the oc
casion reierred to, of George s cutting
down the cherry-tree, acknowledging his
transgression, and receiving a full and
free pardon besides praises and kind ca
rpssps frnm his fathpr. Sn Jim nrtunt
ed by lhe noble example, supplied him
seif wilh a hatchet, and going into his
father's orchard, cut down some choice
fruit trooo Ho Hion nrrxr to 4 H r t--r -
await the old man's coming, and as soon
as he made his appearance, marched. up
to him with a very important air, and ac
knowledged the deed, expecting the next
thing on the programme to be tears, ben
edictionr, and embraces from the offended
parent. But, sad to relate, instead o
this, the old gentleman caught op a hick
ory and gave him an all-fired lamming
Jim was no Washington.
It Made me feel Goot and Slcen
Yell.
The question
as to the intoxicating
properties Of lager
beer is every few
weeks raised in
weeks raised in the New York City
courts. A few days ago, the keeper of
a lasrer beer saloon testified to the fact
that he had known men to drink sixty
glasses of lager beer in the space of four
hours. Another witness stated that some
men could drink forty glasses of lager
beer without feeling any bad effect. A
German testified that he had drank one
hundred and sixty glasses of lager beer
in a day equal to ten gallons. The
Judjre asked him what effect it had on
0 -
nmj, to which he replied : "II
fee goot, and I sleeps veil.
'It made me
He said
, . . A ,
npr. wuiihss sworn rum iih t-ouiti tirinvi
j
, , a-.j
Sauuua a uay u mout uu aueu.u
Uy it.- A number of witness testified to
i . iii l j
-"'"'o -0".j b"" " J
I -
- , ; 'J ;"
1,1U111"
I Get married! Marry, let the risk be
" ,
profession, inspires confidence, and com-
manas respect, una a wjik, me ia-
I . - -
ei is uiuiu nuaiv, 111c uuliui iuuic cs'
I ' 1 1 1 . T 1.
cnant gets a oetter credit, in snort, a
man without a wire is no man at all !
She nurses while sick, she watches for
him in health. - Gentlemen, get a wife,
a pretty one it you like them best; a
good one when.she js to be found ; and a
rich one if you car. find her pretty and
good.
. Sleep, Women require more sleep
than men, and farmers less than those en
gaged in any other occupation. Editors,
reporters, printers, and telegraph opera-
tors,-need no sleep at all. Lavvyers can
sleep as much as they choose, and thus
keep out, of mischief. Clergymen can
sleep twenty-four hours, and put their
F1S" iU UUL,C
1 . 1
- A &MART GlKL. iV leiiCW Was WCU
ding his way a short ; time ago, through
some . narrow nassaore. when he met a
- - - j
pretty modest girl.
Pray, my dear," said he, ?'what do
they call this passage?"
"Balaam s passage, , replied the girl.
"Ah, then," continued the puppyVJ
am like Balaam stopped by an angel."
".And 1 rejoined the girl, as she push
ed past him, -am like the angels, topped
iu
A minister out West, advertises, in the
hone of. making young people come tor
vyaru, max. ne win jnarry laeiu iur
t 1 ' i - i "ii i r it.
a
glass of whisky, a dozen of eggs,
the
first kiss of the bride, and a quarter of a
i . j 1
pig.
Farm and Garden;
The
"ClcTdand Bay.'
. ORIGIN.
The Cleveland Bay Horse' originated
in. the district of Cleveland, in Yorkshire,
ngland ; and n now found, not only in
hat district, and throughout the counties
of York and Durham, but in almost al
parts of the Island. The breed seems
to have been formed by the iudicious
crossing of the race-horse, with the orig
inal breeds of the district, and was not
the. result of a- happy accident, but of
careful and long continued cultivation.
DESCRIPTION.
The color of this breed is bay, as the
name indicates; the height is generally
sixteen hands or over, and the weight be
tween fourteen and fifteen hundred
pounds. The limbs have sufficient bone
and muscle, and are entirely clean.
These horses have a good breast, an ob
lique shoulder, a fine neck, and a noble
carriage. As might be expected, from
the origine, this race combine fine action
with great strength.
ADAPTATION. "
The Cleveland Bay is considered to be
the best carriage horse in the world ; and
for such purpose, is in great demand in
France, as well as Great Britain, is
equally well suited to ordinary farm
work, and on account of his fast walk, is
especially fitted for the plow.
IMPORTATION.
If horses of this description had occa
sionally been imported, instead of race
horses, the interest of the farming com
munity would probably have been more
promoted. Thorough-breeds have con
tributed greatly to the improvement of the
larger and coarser racers, but our horses
are generally too small, to he essentially
benefitted by such a cross, except in rela
tion to speed. For a farm horse, strength
is of more consequence than speed..
Could a horse be found, uniting activity
with strength, that, assuredly, would be
the horse for the farmer. Such, we be
lieve, is the Cleveland Bay. A beauti
f ul horse of his variety, was recently im
ported, and is now owned by Brutus J.
Clay, of Kentucky.
Agricultural Education.
When farming is conducted on scien
tific principles, the increase of crops,
would amply compensate for the labor
and capital expended in the production;
but when it is, as too often happens, re
garded as one of those callings that only
require strong arms and industrious hab
its to ensure success, it is very likely to
prove anything but successful so long as
the true principles of cultivating and
maintaining the fertility of the soil re
main unlearned. Strong hands and pa
tient industry might suffice while popula
tion continued thin and scattered, and
while the land was subject to a very
small amount of impost, but in these days,
when population has become dense, when
the land is subject to high rent and hea
vy taxes, stong arms and industrious ha
bits will not akine suffice to enable the
farmer to meet and overcome his difficul
ties. In these days the battle is not with
with the strong, but with the intelligent ;
and ir the tanner expects to succeed in
his profession, he must begin by acquir
ing a knowledge of the nature of the ma
terials he has to operate upon the na
ture of the productions he has to raise
from them and how best his great ma
chine, the soil, shall be best maintained
in efficient order.
Vegetable Eggs.
We are indebted to E. Sanborn, of
Andover, for specimens of some queer
productions of nature. They are palled
Vecretable Eggs, and lqok, in size, shape.
and ceneral appearance, like Shanghai,
or goose eegs.
T Tx r 1
Dr, Sanborn informs us
that the seed carne from the Patent-Office,
at Washington- The plant is anew
species, and a bright ornament to a gar
den. If planted by a shrub or tree which
is not mere than fifteen feet high the
plant will cover it with those apparent
productions of the Shanghai, or goose.
Dr. Sanborn bas raised a large number
of these eggs, and will gladly distribute
them wherever they will be appreciated-
Boston Journal.
The Cork Tree.
r The Cork Tree, which flourishes natur
ally in the south of Europe, is an ever
green, about twenty or thirty feet high.
The substance denominated Cork is the
outer bark, which sometimes grows two
or three inches in thickness. From the
Patent Office the seed has been distribu
ted to a number of the States, to test the
adaptation to our climate.
Dacks.
' Ducklings intended for the table should
be confined in a warm house, never be
allowed to swim, and have an unlimited
supply of food. A mixture of three
parts of Indian corn meal, and one part
potatoes,' moistened slightly with the
washings of dishes, the liquor in which
meat has been boiled, or milk, with a few
unground grains of barley once daily, fat,
tens thera quickly. . -
He who boasts of his ancesters confess
es that he has no virtue cf his own.
No othp.r person has lived for our honor;
nor ought that to be reputed ours which
was, long before we had a being; for
what advantage can it possibly be to a
man bom blind, that his parents had good
eves ? . 1 ,
! Onr CMp Baskgt. "
Virtue, like some flowers, blooms pftrrj
fairest in the shade. '
A fine coat often covers an intolerable?
fool, but never conceals one.
Men usually follow their wishes till svt:
fering compells them to follojv ihejrjud.jr
ment.
. The highest stage of virtue, is wherf
we begin to love it, not for its ptjepts,but'
for itself.
He is happy whose pircumstances snip
his temper ; but he ' is more happy who;
can always suit his temper to any circumstance.
. Hopeful Youth "You want
ging that's what you do !".
a flog
"1 know I do, dad, but I'll try and get
along without it.".
There was point to the quaint remark
of a plain farmer to a somewhat tranr
sendental preacher: "lake care yoy
don't put the hay on the rack, so high the '
lambs cannot reach it.
Mrs. Partington says th,e onfy way
prevent steamboat explosions, is to "inakje
the engineers b'ile their water on shore.
In her opinion, all the bustin' is done by
cookin' the steam on board.
"How is your husband this afternoon,
Mrs. Squiggs ?" "Why, the .dqctor say?
if he lives till mornin' he shall have
some hopes of him; but if he don't he
must give him cp." . .
An .enthusiastic admirer of the CjT'
was repeatedly saying te fliar Ja great;
"Yes," was the reply of his companionj
"but God is greater." "Ah!" exclaimr
ed the Russian, "but the tzar is young
yet!" '
"Here, you little rascal, walk up hex&
and give an account of yourself wUero
have you been ?"
"After the girls, father."
Did you ever know me fp $0 so wfren
I was young?"
"No, Sir, but mother did."
"My son; you had better go tp be,d.'J
Since the progress of the race seemj
to be the great purpose cf Providence, it
becomes us all to venerate the future.
We must be ready to sacrifice ourselves"
for the coming generation, as they in.,
their turn must Jive for tljeir posterity.
A perpetual conflict wjth natural der
sir.es seems to be the Jot .of our present
state. In youth we require something pf
the tardiness and 'frigidity of age ; and
in acre we must labor to recall the fire and
impetuosity of youth ; in youth .we must
learn to expect ; in age to enjoy."
"How fortunate I am in rAeeting a rain?
beau in this storm," said a young lady -who
was caught in a shower the other
day to her beau of promise jyQ happen- "
ed along with an umbrella. "And I,'7
said be gallantly, "am as rauch so as the
poor Laplander when has caught a rein?
deer.',
A woman is either worth a great deal
or nothing. If good for nothing, she is
not worth getting jealous for ; if she be a
true woman, she wijl gjye no cause for
jealousy. A man is a brute to be jeaj
ous of a good woman a fool to be jeal
ous of a wortless one but is a doublp
fool to cut his throat for either cf them.
Relations take the greatest liberties
and give the least assistance. If a stran-
ger cannot help us with his purse, he will,
not insult us with his comments; but with m
Iations, it mostly happens that they are
the veriest misers with regard to thejp
property, but perfect prodigals in the at:
tide of adrice.
In all novels there is a certain amount,
of truth mixed up with fiction. All tha
incidents related may not have occurred
to one individual ; but to make a work of
fiction truthful, the incidents descibed and
the characters portrayed, must hare thejr '
prototypes in nature and tftp experience
of life.
Patrick, you fool, what makes you start
after that rabbit when your gun hs 110
lock on it ? Hush ! hush ! darling replied
the other, tha rabbit donJt knoy that. .
As the eye of the morning to the lark,
the shade of the eyeniqg to the owl, hon
ey to the bee, or the carcass to the tuI-
ture; so, according to an eminent author.
is life to the heart of man. Though,
bright, it dazzles cot. And yet who is.
he that knoweth it3 true value ?
Each period of life requires special
gifts and graces. Therefore, indepen
dently of the progress of character, per
sons shine particularly in one or another
period, according to their natural tem
peraments and endowments. Those who
most charm us in youth, do not always
dispense the steady fragrance pf good
deeds in middle life; and our ideal cf old
age, is often best satisfied by those vrho
have passed upnoticed through the more,
active periods of life.
Virtue is not more exempt than vica
from the ills of fate, but it contains with
in itself alwuys an energy to resist theny
and sometimes an anodyne to sooth.
"The chains clank on its limbs, but it
$Lags amid its tasks.''
As the petty fish, which js fabled tq
possess the property of arresting the pro
gress of the largest vessel to which it
clings, so may a single predjudice ennof
ticed or dispised, more than the adverse,
blast, or the dead calm, delay the laru
of knowledge in the vast seas of tjrga.