Nebraska advertiser. (Brownville, Nemaha County, N.T. [Neb.]) 1856-1882, October 22, 1857, Image 1

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! ; DEVOTED TO. ART, SCIENC
AGRICULTURE, COMMEECE, NEWS, POLITICS, GENERAL INTELLIGENCE AND THE INTERESTS OF NEBRASKA.
, VOL. II.
CITY OF BEOWNVILE, NEMAHA COUNTY. N. NO. 17.
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I SUITED AND prBLISHED EVERT THURSDAY BY
a- W. FURNAS
n -
I .Second Street, bet. Xtl i.nd "Water,.
j (Lake's Block,)
j BROWNVILLE, N. T.
t rnrfnevctrif paid in Jvancc, - - $2,00
!..'" " at the end of 6 months,. . 2,50
MUM--. - -IV - x uii
Clubs of 12 or more will be furnished at $1,50 per
nDBm, rovidod the cash accompanies the order,
1 1 otherwise. - . .
i RATES OF AT) VERTLSIXG :
1f ,qt,nrs,"(12 lines or less,) one insertion,
$1,00
0,50
2,50
4,00
6,00
10,00
5,00
C0.00
35,00
18,00
10,00
35,00
20.00
10,00
8,00
20,00
13,00
10,00
6.00
l-li lJiMnai insertion,
,f djuarc. i.ne month '
ttirce monius,
six months,
one year.
t j-:incj? Cards of six lines or less one year,
(McCila:nn, one year,
y ie-ha!f Column, one year,
- f.urth " "
foe-eighth " " "
l" Column, six months.
half Cola:nn, six months,
i- fourth " "
ri5hth " " "
" Column, three months,
! balf t'olutan, three months,
Ufurth " " "
! eighth " " "
nn'.an:-i:i5wnli-lates for oCice, (in advance,)
5.00
fih in advance will be required for all advertisc-
t Tfn per tent for each change be added to the
f'uvc rat??.
Sun li; l.issincss Cards of Eve lines orlcss,for
trrs veur, ? j.0!.
j NoadyertisfTnents will be considered by the year,
trM speciSel on the manascript, or previously
I'retJ nKin between the parties.
"Aivfrtie:nentsnot marked on the copy for ft speci
T"J fiuru-'icr of insertions, will be continued until or
i -rl out, and charged accordingly.
" All s-JvcriisemcnTs from strangers or transient per
V vni, to Je paid in ad vance.
Th nri vil'-"e of yearly advertisers will be confined
iljiiTv t..th"Vr own business ; and all advertisements
in- thereto, to be paid fr extra.
' Yearly advertisers have the privilege of changing
tb'iTfljVcrtisoracnts ounrterly.
: All kad.-d advertisamenta charged double the above
4 M
! Alvertimcntson the inside exclusively will be
Tla'ScJ extra.
BOOK AND FANCY
JOB PRINTING!
Hiving a.Ued to the Advertiser Office Card and
; J"b Presses, New Types of the latest styles, Inks of
U eok.rs, 15ron7.es, Fine Paper, Envelopes, Ac.; we
are now prqtarpd to execute Job V;rk of every de
: Si-ription in a rityle unsurpassed by any other office
I in the United States.
! Tartifular attention will be given to orders from a
, distance in having thein promptly attended to.
The Proprietor, wbo, having had an extensive ex-
p -rienuc, will give his personal attention to this branch
' ')f business, and hopes, in his endeavors to please,
' hotb in the exeellence of his work, and reasonable
c iaros.to receive a share of the public patronage.
BUSINESS CAIiDS.
liitowx villi:.
A. S. H0LLADAY. M. D.
SURGEON, PHYSICIAN
-A.xa.ci Obstetrician.
BROWNVILLE, N. T.;
t Solicit? share of public patronage, iu the various
rnehe ;of his profession, from the citiiens of Rrown
v.Ue and vicinitr.
MISS MARY TURNER,
.Tint Street, between Main and "Water,
BROWNVILLE, N. T.
Bonnets an I Trimmings always on hand.
C W. WHEELER,
ARCHITECT AND BUILDER.
JAMES W. GIBSON, .
BLACKSMITH
Second Street, between Main and Nebraska,
BROWNVILLE, X. T.'
i 4. A.BRXDKORP,
' SCLEXXAK,
. Nebraska Citr.N.T.
D. L. WC'GAKY
Crownvillc,N. T
I BRADFORD, McLENNAN k McGARY,
JATTO&HBYS-AT LAW
j AND
j SOLICITORS IN CHANCERY.
j Brownville and Nebraska City,
I . ; NEBRASKA TERRITORY.
T)EIXG rmanenily located in the Territory, we
j U1 g:vc our enure time and attention .tu thi
j pMoticc ot our profession, in all its branches. Hat
rs in Litijration, Collections tf Debts, Sales and
i 1 i-'iaAses of Rual Estate, Selections of Lands, Lea
f Land arrants, and all other business en
y'-inaj t0 our manarrement. will roceive uromrtanJ
'Caful attention.
HEFE?.ENCES.
ehsrd l5rown!
Nebraska City,
Brownville,
-M
St. Joseph, Yo.,
St. Louis, Mo.,
M U
M ' M
Cincinnati O. .
Keokuk, Iowa.
June 7, 1855.
m. ll-.UitzoIl &
Co.,
i n. James-M. Hughes,
"n.Jo!ink.Shcplcv,
J4ssrs. t'roWf M;Creary& Co'
srs. S. G-. Hubbard & Co.,
Jn, J. M. Love, .
i . .Ir T. WHYTE & CO.,
j
J ' '''ndl.ISAtE AND RETAIL DEALERS IS
Ml GOODS. GROCERIES,
..' Qacensware, Hardware, '
!.cOUiMTRY PRODUCE.
' rJUOWNVII.T.K, X. T.
G. W. HURN.
DEPUTY COUNTY SUHVEYOR.
NEMAIIA CITY, N. T. .
WILL attend promptly to all business in his pro
fession when called on : euch as subdivinj
Claims, laying out Town Lots, Drafting City Plate
etc, etc.
37-tI
OLIVER BEXNET.
TM. B. OAKBIT.
ACGCSTU8 KNIGHT.
JAMES P. FISKE.
OLIVER BENNETT & CO.,
Manufacturers and Wbalesale Dealers In
BOOTS AND SHOES,
ISO. 8T MAIN STREET, .
(Fobmrlt, No. 101, Corn or Maix asd Loccst.)
, ST. LOUIS, MO.
WM. OSBORN.
DEALER IM
CLOCKS, WATCHES,
Jewelry, Hated Ware, Cutlery, Spoons, 4c, &c.
Nebraska City, N. T. ' .
"Engravino and Repairing done on Bhort
notice and all work warranted.
A. D. KIRK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Land Agent and Notary Public,
Archer, Richardson county, N. T.
Will practice in the Courts of Nebraska, assisted
by Harding and Bennett, Nebraska City.
JACOB SAFFOIII),
Attorney and Counsellor at Law.
GENERAL INSURANCE AND LAND AGENT.
And Notary Public.
Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory.
WILL attend promptly to all bnisness entrusted
to his care, in Nebraska Territory and West
ern Iowa.
September 12, 1856. vlnl5-ly
W. P. LOAN,
ATTOBHEY AT LAW,
LAND AND LOT AGENT.
ARCHER, RICHARDSON COUNTY, N. T.
Notice to Pre-Emptors !
G. S. IIORBACII & CO.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
AND
REAL ESTATE BROKERS.
OMAHA CITY, N. T.
WILL give particular attention to preparing all
the necessary papers for Pre-emptions, and
rendering any assistance which maybe required by
Pre-emptors in proving up their Pre-emption rights
at the U. S. Land Office. 45-Cm
R. E. HARDING. G. ?. KIMBOUGH B. F. TOOMEB.
HARDING, KIF.1BGUGH & CO.,
Manufacturer and Wholemle Dealer in
IIATS, CAPS & STRAAV GOODS,
No 49 Main street, bet. Olive and Fine,
ST. LOUIS, MO.
Particular attention paid to manufacturing our
Gnest Mole Hats.
R. PEERY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN, SURGEON
And
OESTETITTCTA 1ST,
ELDORADO, N. T.
RESPECTFULLY tenders his professional ser
vices to the citizens of Nemaha county and ad
joining counties, both in Nebraska and Alissoun,
June 1 1th, 1857.
51-6m
J. HART & SON
iimik HARNESS
.Oregon, Holt Conuty, Missouri
Keepconstantly on hand all description of Harness,
Saddles, Bridles, &c, Ac.
N. R. Every article in our shop is manufactured
by ourselves,and warranted to give satisfaction.
REAL ESTATE AGENCY.
GEORGE CLATE3. ' J. "VT. LEE.
CLAYES & LEE,
Real Estate and Gcncril' Agency,
OMAHA CITY, N. T.
References.
James "Wright, Broker, New York,
Win. A. Woodward, Esq. " i u
Hon. U. Wood, Ex-Gov. of Ohio, Cleveland,
Wkks, Otic and Brownell, Bankers, "
Alcott L Horton, "
Col. Robert Campbell, St. Louis,
James Kidgway, Esq. 44
Crawforn and Sackctt' Chicago.
Omaha City, Aug. 30, 1856. vlnl3-ly
II. P. BESNETT. J. 8. MORTON. E. H. H ARDIKO
BENXET, MORTON & HARDING.
Attorneys -at Law,
Nebraska City, N. T., and Glenwood, la.
TTILL practice in all the Courts of Nebraska and
V Western Iowa. Particular attention nnirf .
obtaining, locating Land "Warrants, and collection of
oeois,
REFERENCE :
lion. Lewis Cass, Detroit. I lf. v.
Julius D. Morton, , Michigan;
Oov. Joel A. Matteson, SpringSeld, 111
Gov. J. W. Grimes, Iowa City, Iowa;
B. P. Fifiled, St. Louis.Mo.;
Hon. Daniel O. Morton. Toledo, Ohio;
P. A. Sarpy. Bollevue, Nebraska:
Sedgcwich &. Walker, Chicago, 111:
Green, Wearc & Benton. Council Bluffs,Iowa.
JAMES CAKGILL. GEO CARGILL.-
J. & G. W. CARGILI,,
FORWARDING AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS.
AND. MANUFACTURER'S AGENTS,
siinmuuKi uuiiuiii;, si, Joseph, Mo.
CONSIGNMENTS of Goods and ProdQC
respectfully solicited, and all business entrust.
cd to us-will be promptly and carefully attended to
at lae lowest rates. - . -
References.
Taylor & Shepherd, St. Louis,
R. L. McGheeA Co.,
Livcrmore, Cooley A Co., " .
Merchants Generally, St. Joseph.
T. B. CCMINtf. C. TCRI.
CUMING & TURK,
Attorneys at Law & Real Estate Agents
OMAHA CITY, N.
"TTILL attend faithfully and promptly to all busi
V V ness entrusted to them, in the Territorial or
Iowa Courts, to ,the purchase of lots and lands, en
trries and pra-cmntions. collections, ic. " ,
Office in the second story of Henry fc Rootsnew
build:n!, ncar'.y opposite the Western Exchange
Uank, tarnham street. ,
Dec. 27, 156. tloSStf '
Miscellaneon
Peeps from a Printing Office.
BY A TYPO.
"Little dront of water, : is
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean, ;
And the beauteous land." ;
- , , ...... :
1
Ugll!', ezcUims- some would be
delicate lady "the very sound reminds
one. of the smell of oil, and we shall
hear nothing but the clanking of
machinery and the clicking of type."
Well, .what of that, fair lady ? True
the oil we may use is not so highly
perfumed as that with which you
smother your ringlets ; but for all that
it has the same bases and is applied
to a far nobler purpose. The clanking
of our machinery may not be pleasant
to your over refined taste; but to the
true poet it has a sound sweeter than
the "tinkling of symbals." The click
ing of type may be ever disgreeable
to vou. but we would rather hear it
" - . ...
and Ct.use it, than, be possessed of the
gift of a Jenny Lind, were we to have
our choice of the two.
Ours is a glorious mission, fellowr
craftsmen, rnnces and ' potentates
own our sway, and there is nothing
mightier than ours. As we 'stand up
to the case, worn out and weary though
we may be, we have at least the com
fort of the thought that though Ave
cannot find an acre of God's earth
that we may call our own though we
are poorly paid and heavily taxed
though there may not be one to whom
... ll " . '
neuiiiy airy ui iu auuiuci cuuie ;
though we may well know that we
shall leave no mighty name behind us,
with our name blazoned on history's
page and sculptured in marble yet
we are assured that our works shall
not perish. Long after we shall have
been laid beneath the sod, the "still
small voices" with which we have
spoken will go on with their mighty
work, accomplishing the good which
we have sought while living. With
our "mallets" Tve have driven home
wedges "which, shall in time overturn
principalities and powers. With "shoot
ing irons" of more effect than Sharp's
Rifles or Colt's Revolvers, we march
to the battle against wrong, far more
sure of victory than they who wield
he sword. ...... I
Oftentimes, as we have stood at our
ase" merrily sticking the magical
strips of metal, which seemed as things
of life under our fingers, have we
aucrhed in our sleeves as we thought
how many would be anxiously watch-
in 2 for the result of our labors how
many hopes and fears hung on the
mere epsi dixit of the types how much
the leading men and writers of our
day arc indebted to the humble but
none less valuable labors of the typo.
And again pur heart would grow sad
as twe thought of those to whom we
should be the bearers of evil tidings.
How many of those ,who read the
dolorious headingsl "Dreadful Disaster
Fearful Railroad Accident and Great
Loss of Life !" &c, are untouched by
the sad news. To many and many a
home do we thus convey the sad in
telligence, and as we do so, there swells
up in our heart a prayer for the loved
ones : at home, and a hymn that we
were not of those who were so sud
denly and fearfully launched into
eternity.
But we have a higher and a nobler
mission than that of , mere, messenger.
Printers arc emphatically the reformers
of the age in which they live. In
the dirtv room where few butmechan-
ical sounds are heard a busy work of
mind is going on. Those rough look
ing men standing at their cases, are
now, perhaps, giving to the world their
own great and noble thoughts speaking
with their metalic tongues, words that
will cheer some fellow-worker, or spur
some dreamer to works that ho never
thought himself capable of sow seed
by the wayside that in time will spring
up and bear good fruit, even an hun
dred fold by planting a vine that shall
at some future day shelter the weary
pilgrim on life's journey striking, a
rock from whence shall gush a fountain
of pure water, refreshing, to many 'a
faint and disheartened denizen of this ,
cold world of ours. No new measure
9 , I
is proposed no new principles of
science, art, politics or mechanics is
promulgated, but these busy printers
these ready thinkers seize upon it,
and proceed to enlighten the public
upon its' bearings' and applications -
for a wonderfully practicd set are they-
liducated,"as they generally, are in the
sternest of all "systems,- that of hard
won experience, they look at life as a
reality, divested of false adornings and
outward shows. By the time thatthey
arrive at manhood's years, for their
printer life must commence early
they have the right to stand among
men many years their seniors and call
them equals. The poor boy's college
has fitted them for.such a life struggle
as few outsiders know of. With a
brave heart and a slim "purse often
with naught but his'rule in his pocket
many a typo , leaves the scenes of
his earlier experience to go forth to
seek his fortunein-some distant section.
If every thing else failshim you may
rest1 assured that his stock of brass
will not.-'With this and an indomita-
ble nerseverence, and without a particle
of grceness, you may trust the iour
printer to make his way wherever he
may place himself. '
Tlie Tragedian Booth and the Lord's 1
Prayer.
: Booth and several friends had been
invited to dine with an old gentleman
- . .. ..... . .... . - . . I
in Baltimore of distinguished kindness
urbanity and piety. The'host, though
disapproving of theaters and theater-
going had heard so much of Booth's
remarkable ; powers, that curiosity to
see the man in this instance, overcome
all his : prejudice's. ' After the enter-
tainment was ovcr'and company re-
seated in the drawing room; some one
requested Booth as a particular favor,
and - one which doubtless all present
would appreciate,' to read the Lord's
Prayer. Booth expressed his willing-
ness to afford them this gratification,
and all eyes were turned expectantly!
upon him.
Booth rose slowly and reverently
Trom his chair. It was wonderful to
watch the play of emotions that con-
.vulsed his countenance. He became
deadly pale, and his eyes turned trem
bling upward, were wet with tcars.-
As yet he had not spoken. The silence j
could be felt. It 'became absolutely
painful, until ' at last the spell was
broken, as if by an electric shock, as
a rich toned voice, from white lips,
syllabled forth, "Our father, who art in
Heaven," &c, with a pathos and sol-
emnity that thrilled all hearts.
He finished. The silence continued,
Not a voice was heard, or a muscle
moved in his wraft -audience, until
from a remote corner of the room, a
subdued sob was heard, and' the old
gentleman, their host, stepped forward
with streaming eyes and : tottering
frame, and seized Booth by the hand,
t,C1' 3 1. ' 1 1- i.
cir, saiu ne, m uroKen auceuis,
"you have afforded me a pleasure for
which my whole future life 'will feel
ratified. I am an old man - and every
o . .. -
day from mv boyhood .to the present
time, I thought, I had repeated the
Lord's Prayer,but I have never heard
- . ... 1 - , -
it before, never. ' ' l '
"You are right " replied Booth, "to
read that prayer as it should1 be read,
has caused me the severs't study: and
labor for 'thirty years, and Tarn far
from being yet satisfied with my
rendering of that wonderful production
Hardly one person inrten '.thousand
. . ' ' . i -i "li ' 1 '
j.xcLkiAijr uuw - - -
comprehends howmuth beauty, tender-
ness and grandeur 'bd condensed- into
criOAAoe-emoll nrtr1'mVnrd sft'slmnlfl.'
KM OjlUV Uk7 OU1U1A - w
The prayer of itself sufficiently illus-
trates the truth of theBible, and stamps
upon it the seal of divinity."
So great was the effect produced,
ooVa mtr Jnformonf xrho tVaS TJrfiSAn't
that conversation was sustained but a
short time longer in subdued monosyl-
lables, and almost entirely ceased ; and
soon after, at an early hour,' the com-
pany broke up, ; and retired to their
several homes, with sad and full hearts,
Episcopal Recorder.
, How Marat Died.
The sentence of the military com
mission was -read to him with due
. .
solemnity. He listened to it, as he
would have listened to the cannon of
another battle during his military life
without emotion or bravado. '. . He
neither asked for pardon, for delay,
nor for appeal.- He had advanced .of
his own accord, toward the door as if
to accelerate the catastrophe, lhe
door . opened on a. narrow esplanade
lying between the towers of the castle
and the outer walls. Twelve soldiers
Avith loaded muskets awaitedhim there.
The narrow space did not permit him
to stand at a sufficient distance to de
Pnve "is death of a part of his honor.
Marat, in stepping over the threshold
01 tne cnambcr, tound himself face to
&ce tn them.: He refused to have
his eyes bandaged, and, looking at the
soldiers with a firm; and benevolent
smile, said
"My friends, do not make me suffer
by taking bad aim. The narrow space
uul"PCia minus iu resi me muzzie
of your muskets on my breast; do not
strike me in .the face ; aimatmyheart
here ifc ia"
As he spoke thus, he placed' his
nSht nand uPon his coat, to indicate
the position of his heart. . In his left
hand he held a small medahon, which
contained, in one focus of love, the
image of his wife and four children,
as if he wished thus ! to make them
witnesses' of his last look. ' He fixed
nis eyes on this portrait, and received
tn death-blow in the contemplation of
it 1 1 . 1 ... . .': il . TT i i ' ' '1
an ne iovea on earm; nis Doay piercea
at so short a distance with twelve balls,
fellt witn: nis arms open and -his face
towards the earth, as if still embracing
the kingdom he once possessed, and
which he had come to re-ebnquer for
his tomb. They threw his cloak upon
his body, which was buried in the
Cathedral of Pizzi. Thus died the
most chivalrous soldier of the imperial
epoch and the greatest but the most
heroic figure among the champions of
the new Alexander.
Judge not they neighbor.
"What are another's fanlt3 to me?
I've not a vulture's hill
To pick at every flaw I see," '
And make it wider still. .
It is enough for me to know
I've follies of my c wd,
And on my heart the care bestow,
And let my friends alone. -
What the wind says.
"Do you know what the winter's
wind says, grandpa?" asked a little
child at an old merchant's knee
"No, puss; what does it?" he ans-
wered stroking her fair hair.
" Remember; tho poor !' Grandpa,
when it comes down the chimney it
roars, 'Remember the poor! when
it puts its great mouth to the
keyhole it'-whistles, Remember the
poor!' when it strides through a crack
in the door it whispers it; andgrandpa,
when it blows your beautiful silver hair
in the street, and yOu shiver and button
up your coat, does it not get at your
J i. ! - itm.ll -rmtnn
ear, anu say bu iuu, m emui iuiw,
grandpa?"
"Why, what, ddes the child mean?
cried pa,' who, I am afraid; had been
I . . ... ... 1
used to shut his heart against sucu
words.- "You want a new muff and
tippet, I reckon; a pretty way to get
.i r .1 To V, n.. "
mem out. oi uur uiu giaumavu.
"No, grandpa,' said the child, ear
nestly,' shaking her head ; "no; its the
no muff and tippet children I'm thihk-
ing of; my mother always remembers
them, and so do 1 try.
After the next storm the old mer
chant sent fifty dollars to the treasurer
I'C 1 BXA "Poll
J
ot a relief society, and said,
VU1A A V
reasurer
was the
more' when you want it." The treasurer
started with surprise, for it was the
X '
first time he had ever collected more
than a dollar from him, ana mat ne
thought, came grudgingly.
"Why," said the old merchant,
JlftAWfird. 4I COuld never get Tld Of
that child's words; they stuck to me
like due."
"And a little child shall lead them,"
says the Scripture. How many a cold
heart has melted, and a close heart
opened, by. the simple earnestness and
suggestive words of a child!
Keep Your Temper. . - I
"I never can keep any thing," cried
Emma, almost stamping with y ration. F-
"Somebody always takes ray things
and looses them." ,SheJiad mislaid
some of her sewing implements.
"There is one thing," remarked
mamma, "that I think you might keep
if you would try." .
"I should like to keep even ,one
thing," answered Emma.
, "Well, then, my dear," resumed
mamma, "keep your temper; if you
will only do that, perhaps, you would
find it easy to keep other things. I
dare say, now, if you had employed
your time in searching for the missing
articles, you might have found them
before this time ; but you have .not
even looked for them. You have only
got into ; a passion a bad way of
spending time, and you have accused
somebody, and very unjustly, too, of gone to the lady s house. Tho hui
taking away your things and losing band was penurious as well as jealoui
them. Keep your temper, my dear;
when you have mislaid any article,
keep your temper and search for it.
You had better keep your temper, if
you lose all the little property you
possess; getting into a passion, never
brings any thing to light except a dis-
torted face, and by losing your temper
you become guilty of two sins you
yet into a passion, and accuse some-
I repeat, keep your temper.'
., w I
Emma subduedher ill humor, search-
ed for the articles she had lost, and
found them in her 'work-bag. '
"Why, mamma, here they are ; I
might have been sewing all the time,'if
I had kept my temper."
Happy Mary. She moved about
the house like a sunbeam. I heard
her singing as she passed to and fro,
and her mother heard her too, and said,
with a fond smile :
"It is Mary! She is always-the
same, always happy. I do not know
r a
what I would do without her."
"I do not know what any of us would
do without Mary," repeated her eldest
daughter, and the rest echoed her
words.
Her youngest brother is of a violent
temper, and is always quarreling with
somebody ; but he never quarrels with
Mary because she will not quarrel with
him, but strives to turn aside his anger
by. gentle words. Even her very
presence has an influence over him.
Did He Die For Me?
A little child sat quietly upon its
mother a lap. Its soft blue eyes were
looking earnestly into the face which
was beaming with love and tenderness
for the cherished darling. The maternal
lips were busy with a story. The
tones of the voice were low and serious
for the tale was one of mingled sadness
and joy. Sometimes they scarcely
rose above a whisper, but the listening
babe caught every sound. The crimson
deepened on its little cheek, as the
story went on increasing in interest.
Tears gathered in its earnest eyes, and
, i i .i ii . i
a low sor. proKe me siumessas us
my ther concluded. A moment and the
ruby lips parted, and in tones made
tremulous by eagerness, the child in
quired: "Did he die for me, mamma ?"
"Yes, my child, for you for all."
"May I love Him always, mamma,
and dearly too?"
"Yes, my darling, it was to win your
love that He left his bright and beautiful
home.
"And He will love me, mamma, I
know He will. He died for me.
When may I see Him in his other
home?"
"When your spirit leaves this world,
my darling."
"My spirit?" murmured the child.
"Yc3, your spirit; that part of you
which thinks, and "knows, and loves.
If you love Him here, you will go live
with Him in heaven."
"And I may love . Him here. How
glad you have made me, dear mamma."
And. the mother bowed her head,
and prayed silently and earnestly that
her babe might love the Saviour.
Photographic Secrets!
The jealousy with which Mons.
, one of the wealthiest men of
the quarter Beaujon, guarded tho
beauty of his wife was something re-
markable - even extending to his ah-
solute refusal of the visits of aphysician.'
at the most critical periods. It was'
among hi3 own amateur accomplish
meats that he experimented daily in
photograpy, and, on his lovely wife'j
being afiiicted with a tumor on Jieriide'y
nd begging that a physician might
called in to examine it, the jealous-
husband had to resort to hi3 new art. "
ne took a daily photbefrfrp'h oj the turner
as it grew, r "1. himself carried it to
the doctor examination and pre-i
scription. The afflicting swelling took""
it3 course and was healed, in time; and '
the bill cam3 duly in, for medical visits
all tho same 'as if the doctor had
however, and insisted on a deduction
of the differenca between advice giveri.
at a medical office or in ar paid visit.-
By the suggestion of a probability
that the photographic pictures of a
Uady'n side (which the doctothad prc
served) might figure in a medical book's
engravings, with a description of tho
case, tho views of the husband werb
somewhat altered, and the original bill
T .
during a siego a water-carrier was.
crying his water 'through: the .town,,
"Six sous a gallon ! six sous a golldn H
?J-and-by a bomb-shell carried off ond "
of hi3 barrels, whereupon,' without
moving a muscle of his face,; he. con
tinued, "Twelve sous a gallon ! twelvo
sous a gallon !"
It is somewhere related that a poor
soldier, having had his skull fractured
was told by the doctor that his brains
were visible.
. "Do . write to father," he; replied,-'
"and tell him of it, for he always siid
I had no brains."
"Sonny, where is your' father?' '
"Father's dead, Sir." ' :
"Have you any mother?"
"Yes, I had one, but 'she V got mar-..
ried to Joe Dankin, and don't be any
she's got enough to do to tejid to hi;j
own young uns!"
"Smart boy! here s a penny for.
you. -. "
"That's yc, Sir; it's the way r.get
mv livin'!" - ' '
"How?"
"Why, by tellin' big yarns to grien .
uns like vou!"
One can hardly realize-the idea of
such a man as General -Washington
listening to a "Caudle lecture' front
his wife; but Mrs. Kirklahd, in her
late "Life of Washington," gives a'
piquant instance of the kind, which,
if true, deserves to be remember by
other and moe ordinary mortals as a
consolation in their domestic troubles;-.
She says that aguest at Mount Vernon
lying awake one night, heaTd :Mr'.
Washington deliver a very animated
rebuke to her husband in fact, sl;6
scolded him severely. General Wanh-'
ington listened to all in profound
silence; then, with a sigh,- gaily said,
"Now, a good night to you, my. dear 1"
A country lecturer, some years since,"
thu3 described part ot his apparatus;
"ow, gentlemen, this here wess?! is
tul1 ot air, and that Jere we3scl is full
of waccum.
. "Madam," said 'a doctor one to the
mother of a sweet, healthy babe, "tljo
i : ! 1 ' ' i . i ' ' " .
laaies nave uepuiea me.io inquire wnat
you do to have such a happy, uniform
good child?" The mother mused for
a moment over the strangeness of the
question, and then she replied, simply
and beautifully : "Why, God has given
me a healthy child, and I Id it aline"-
. 1
!
Tom, you seem to gain 'flesh every,
day the grocery business must ngrcc'
with you; what did you weigh' list t"
"Well, Simon, L really .forget nor, bv.t
it strikes mc it was a pound ot button ;