The commoner. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-1923, February 01, 1914, Page 30, Image 30

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The Commoner
VOL. 14, NO. 2
30
Pr
1
A Car For Luxury Loving People
Cartercar Colonial Coupe
Fully Equipped, Price
$1900
Seats
Three
People
With
Comfort
yy3B0E IKLaHHilflHHIHjKbrAP
Gearess
Transmission
Electric
Starter
Electric
Lights
This Cartercar Colonial Coupe presents an appeal to comfort
loving people, both men and women, that is hard to resist.
And that is just the end we havestriven for in designing and
building Model 5-0.
Like all Cartercars, it has the simple two unft patent drive
system which makes potent every ounce of pull in the sturdy
four cylinder valve enclosed silent engine.
The gearless transmission also makes starting and stopping"
a pleasure. The wheels and disk roll gently together so as to
avoid all quick, jerky movements as the engine takes hold or
lets go.
This Cartercar Model is very popular with Ihe ladies, also
physicians and professional men.
DESOItll'TIOK OF MODKI, 5-C
OutHldo llnlsh Raven blue, black
chassis.
Insldo finish, upholstory In fine
loathor and dark bluo broadcloth,
dark bluo seaming laco and silk
curtains, flashes In rich shade of
Gonulno San Domingo Mahogany,
French plato glass windows and
doors, doimi light In celling.
Three passengers are accommo
dated comfortably, an extra seat
utilizing the spaco between the reg
ular seat and tho dash. This seat
can bo folded out of the way when
only two persons are riding.
Is right hand driven and has
doors opening both sides affording
easy entrance no matter which
way you drlvo up to tho curb.
Whether Common or Not
Tho Coupe has all the easy elegance and refined luxury of an
electric, yet tho sterling worth and extraordinary ability of a Carter
car. Will you ride in one? Write us.
CARTERCAR COMPANY
PONTIAC, MICHIGAN
Branches at New York, Chicago, Detroit, Kansas City and Atlanta
Old Fashioned Stuff
I knew a kid one day
Who looked beyond wide orchard
lanes of white
To where a fellow held the laureled
way
Of fame and name and fortune in
the fight;
A kid who heard life calling, and who
turned
To catch tho echo of far-marching
feet
Where crimson fires of glory flashed
and burned
Along the borders of the swarming
street.
I know a fellow now
Who looks across gray years with
weary eyes
Beyond the laurel and tho olive
bough
To rose-sweet dreams beneath re
membered skies.
To fields of golden harvest and the
glow
Of God's lost sunshine waning to
the gleam
Of star-lit dusk back home, so long
ago
It only seems the phantom of a
dream.
I know a fellow who
Would give life's motley fame
again to bo
In orchard drifts where lost winds
wander through
And whisper sighing from the
bending tree;
Who dreams at each gray dusk
within his den
Of old time honor and old
fashioned truth,
And cries to God to lead him back
again
And leave him with the clean,
bravo faith of youth.
Grantland Rice in Collier's.
topics, when Miss Katharine Gray,
the theatrical star, told of Uncle
Rastus' interpretation of circum
stantial evidence.
Uncle Rastus, it seems, was ar
rested on a charge of rallying around
a chicken coop, and on being fo,und
guilty by the jury, was given a short
term in jail.
One day a sympathetic friend
called to ee Rastus, and questioned
him on how his present unfortunate
condition came to pass.
"Dey jes done sent me .ter jail
when dey jiadn't no right ter," elo
quently answered Rastus. "Dat's
what my lawyer tole 'em. I wah con
victed on circumstantial ebidence."
"Dat doan sound good ter me,
Rastus," dubiously remarked the
friend, shaking his head. "What am
circumstantial ebidence?"
"From de way dat I understand
it," explained Rastus, "circumstantial
ebidence am de feathers dat yo' leave
around when yo' nab got done wid de
chicken." Philadelphia Telegram.
Always
There always is a petition of some
kind to bo signed.
There always is a chance to buy a
ticket for the benefit of some charity.
Always there is an insurance prera-
Attractive
Clubbing Offers
.3
m r
i
2.
B
ti O
B M
Roosevelt's Joke
FRFF
25
BEAUTIFUL
POST CARDS
'
?UL 1
No Two Alike
FREE to Subscribers of
THE COMMONER
To the first 100 subscribers paying their subscriptions
for one year or mote at the regular rate of $1.00 per
year, we will give absolutely free one set of these Post
Cards. They aro assorted floral, sentimental, anni
versary and motto cards, such as retail from one cent
to five cents each. Come early with your subscription
and get a set. Clip and return tins advertisement with
your remittance.
100 Sets
NO MORE
FREE
WHILE THEY LAST
That Col. Roosevelt has a great
sense of humor is not always ad
mitted by his enemies. His friends,
however, back up the contention that
he is witty as well as humorous by
numerous instances.
"We came into New York one
morning from a New England cam
paign trip," said George Henry
Payne, "and the colonel invited us to
have breakfast with him at one of
his clubs. The colonel's fnvnrHo
.breakfast food is fishballs, and this
diet was accepted as satisfactory to
most of his guests.
I "He had taken a mouthful of flnii
: ball that had been placed before him
wiien he turned and said:
" 'What is this fishball?'
"I tasted mine and confessor! t.hnt
it did not taste like those that mother
used to make.
"The colonel took a second mouth
ful and then said:
" 'It's lemon, by George!'
"At this moment the waiter placed
in front of him some Viennese rolls.
Roosevelt reached for one, when he
noticed that they were all of the
highly polished variety.
" 'Waiter he said, in a most apol
ogetic tone, 'I may be feeling fussy
this morning, but I do not like lemon
in my fishballs; I do not care for var
nish on my rolls; could you bring me
two soft-boiled eggs without turpen
tine?' "Metropolitan.
American Boy -. $1.00 91.5.".
American xuagazine 1.50
American Poultry Journal..' 1.00
Breeder's Gazette .' 1.00
Cincinnati Daily Post, R. R.
Edition 2.50
Commercial Appeal 50
Courier-Journal, Weekly . . . 1.00
Etude (For Music Lovers) . . 1.50
Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio,
Weekly 1.00
Field & Stream 1.50
Fruit Grower & Farmer.... 1.00
Hoard's Dairyman 1.00
Homo & State, Dallas, Tex. 1.00
Housewife 50
Independent, N. Y 3.00
Irrigation Age ; 1.00
Kansas City Weekly Star... .25
La Toilette's Magazine 1.00
Lipplncott's Magazine ....... 3.00
Literary Digest (new) 3.00
McCall's Magazine 50
McClure's Magazine ". 1.50
Modern Priscilla , ,-. 1.00
National Monthly 1.00
Outdoor World . . , '. . 2.50
Outlook 3.00
Pearson's Magazine 1.50
Pictorial Review 1.00
3.00
1.90
1.55
1.75
2.00
1.15
1.10
2.00
1.25
1.00
1.25
1.55
1.40
1.15
3.00
1.40
1.00
1.25
3.00
3.30
1.20
1.00
l.CO
1.25
2.05
3.40
1.80
1.75
3.40
1.15
1.50
1.25
1.15
3.00
1.40
Circumstantial Evidence
The conversation at a recent tea
took a turn to courts and kindred
Pittsburgh Post, Daily
1'ouitry Success . , 50
practical farmer ............ 1.00
Pulitzer's Magazine 1.00
Reliable Poultry Journal... .50
Review of Reviews' 3.00
Rock Mountain News,- Wkly. 1.00
Springfield Republican,
WAe.lc!y --i;.- LP
Mb. UUUIO,ClJUUUU,
Twlce-a-Week
Sunset Magazine. San Fran-
m Cisco, Cal 2.t0
Technical World 1.50
The Sphere 1.75
Wallace's Farmer 1.00
Woman's Home Companion 1.50
Word and Works and Hick's
Almanac 1,00
Now York World, Thrice-
a-Week vm
Youth's Companion 2.00
-me acnes' l-iome Journal or Satur
day Evening Post may be added to any
club at an additional cost of $1.50 each.
Extra postage required upon all
papers going to Canadi or foreign
countries and also for subscription in
a city where, the respective periodicals
are published unless they are weeklies.
Address all orders and ttfako all re
mittances payable to The ComiueMer
Lincoln, Nel,
1.75
".50 1.25
2.50
1.00
1.15
1.00
2.00
In
2.50
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