The commoner. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-1923, August 13, 1909, Page 12, Image 12

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The Commoner
VOLUME 9, NUMBER 31
dispatch carried by the United Press
says: "In tho list of committees ap
pointed for tho sixty-first congress,
announced by Speaker Cannon in tho
closing hours of tho extra session, it
is observed that tho states west of
tho Mississippi river get only thir
teen chairmanships out of a total of
sixty-two. To bocomo tho chairman
of a committee of tho houso is tho
principal yearning of every member.
Tho chairmanship of oven a small
committee adds something to a mem
bers prestige. Tho leadership of a
big committee invoBts him with great
power. In many caBes ho can make
or break a bill, and the men who
must look to committeos for favor
ablo reports need tho good will of
tho chairman. In tho now list of
committees Pennsylvania holds
olovon chairmanships, New York and
Illinois 'seven each, Massachusetts
six, Now Jersey and Kansas four
each, Michigan and Connecticut three
each, Minnesota, New Hampshire,
Iowa and West Virginia two each;
Wyoming, South Dakota, Wisconsin,
Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland, Okla
homa, Vermont and Indiana one
each. Now England having only
twenty-eight members of tho house,
has twelve chairmanships, while the
Pacific coast, with twelve members,
has none. Tho south has three chair
men and, as stated, the great region
west of tho Mississippi river only
thirteen. Both tho members from
New Hampshire and the single mem
ber from Wyoming aro chairmen.
Throe of tho four from Connecticut
and four of the ten from New Jersey
aro at the head of committees."
A TiTGHTNING METHOD OP CAL
CULATING INTEREST
'One of tho shortest and simplest
methods known for calculating in
terest is to multiply the principal by
tho number of days, and divide as
follows:
, For 4 per cent, divide by 90.
For 5 per cent, divide by 72
For G per cent, divide hf 60.
For 7 per cent, divide hy 52.
For 8 per cent, divide by 45.
; Then point off four decimal places.
For instance, to find interest on
$360.00 for 92 days at 8 per cent,
multiply $360.00 by 92, divide by
45, and point off four decimal places.
The result is $7.36. Implement
Age.
7.01111 flHRP of, 1rst aity lrrlgat
I tUUU HimLO ed farm lands in the
X.lttlo Laramie Valley, near Laramie,
at very low rates for either large or
small tracts. Local agents wanted. Ad
dress H. W. Quaintance, Laramie, Wyo.
Patents &jX Mgfr
folding BATH TUB
Wiciairr 10 Pounds. CosUt
,UUW. Ilruulre little wUr.
Write for Hiwclnl offer.
O. N. Y. BATH MFC. CO.
IBS Chambers Bt., N. Y. City.
yij
Roundabout Humiliations
At Largo In Nebraska, August 5.
Time, together with man's Ingenuity,
can make somo wonderful changes.
Fifteen years ago tho architect drovo
around over a goodly bit of what Is
tinw Knnttn Bluff countv. Nebraska.
Thero were only a few homesteaders
there then, and they were trying
desperately to get away. Many had
left. Drouth and lack of money were
tho twin causes. Many homestead
ers who had proved up were willing
to sell their quarter sections, houses
and all, for from $150 to $250.
Day before yesterday the architect
stood on the summit of Scott's Bluff
and viewed the landscape o'er. And
although he could see for many miles
in every direction he did not see an
acre of land that could be bought
for less than $75 an acre, and much
of it that could not be bought for
less than $300 an acre. The solu
tion is wrapped up in the one word,
"irrigation."
Some men -who have made for
tunes are credited with unusual busi
ness ability. The fact of the matter
is, they are creatures of circum
stance. There aro men In Scotts
Bluff county today who are well to
do simply because they couldn't help
themselves. If they had been per
mitted to have their way they would
be as poor as any of us. The only
reason they are independent now' Is
because they couldn't sell their land
fifteen or sixteen years ago. They
had to leave it and go elsewhere to
make a living, but the first thing
they knew irrigation projects had de
veloped and their worthless lands be
gan rising In value hy leaps and
bounds. What they thought was ca
lamity was in reality their great for
tune. And some of them are swell
ing around as if they alone were
responsible for their present condition.
Fifteen or sixteen years ago about
all that was Taised In the Scotts
Bluff section of Nebraska was la
mentations and tax sales. Today the
air is freighted with the songs of
thanksgiving, mixed melodiously
with the noise of the hammer, the
saw, the self-binder and the thresher.
Now and then you catch the clang
and clamor of some railroad being
rushed into this splendid territory.
A "big sugar factory is in cpurse of
erection at Scotts Bluff. The mere
prophecy of such a thing fifteen years
ago would have subjected the
prophet to the attention of the
lunatico inquirendo.
Yet some people tell us there is
acre, and refuses to put a price on
what she has left. Now if you can
flguro out anything else than luck
in all this you are a better hand at
figures than tho architect.
But it isn't all luck. There are
men and women in Nebraska who
havo had an abiding faith in that
section all the time. Some of them
had tho wherewithal to back their
faith, but most of them did not. Out
at Sidney are a couple of men who
have never lost faith, and they had
a little money to back up their faith.
During all the long and bitter years
between 1890 and 1903 they never
lost an opportunity to get hold of
more of that land. Now and then
they actually pinched themselves for
many things in order to raise the
money to purchase title to a few
more acres. Today they need have
no fear of the wolf gnawing holes
in their door, and when they ride
they recline on the velvet cushions
of the parlor cars. There are men
in that same town who used to call
these two men crazy. Those who
used the epithet are pretty generally
working at odd jobs around the town
or drawing salaries from the two
men above mentioned.
DO YOU WANT A "HOMKT-WK HAVE 100 OV n ,,Vh i ' ."?
tliebDflt fUrmslUJsoutheiwtorn Kaiwni ou tho oasl- " suctl tiling as luck!
-Cat terms Ol nllV lnild Sold in thn Ktntn Rmwl r. nmonrliam "W1 j
est terms 01 nuy land sold in tho stnto. Send for
rony o mo tsouuienstcru kmifui HomcHopkor.
tho best Tmujthly liuid pnper rulllFhea-4t Is freo.
Address, Tho Allen County Investment Co
X.onctoti, Kan.
ADMIRAL 2 MAN PRESS.
ADXIXAIi HAY MESS CO., Kaasts City. Xt,
3-STROKE SELF-FEED HAY PRESS.
iuMti .Lnu - i AU&iMiaiflirwi
Twb Mm can ran II.
Tba Anlo-Fulan HiyPrHiCa.
1533 W. 121b St. K.CMi
AskfarCalatecuaNo.33
WR Ruby FREE
To Introduce our beautltul genuine
Gems, sold direct from nilue to cust
omer t to 4 Jc-olers price, we -will
send frw a genuine Navajo Kuhy, tin.
I cut, nd our beautiful 36 paire Art Cat.
. , . atocue showlnit Gem In actual colors
nd sues. Don miss this unusual offer. Send today.
Francis E.UstcrCompany, Deot.HA8, Mosllla Park,N,M
bomewhere back in Maromnim
setts thero is a woman who knows
better. Twenty years ago she loaned
a few thousand dollars on land now
embraced in Scotts Bluff county.
Later tme had to take it on the
mortgages, and for ten years she
wept and complained about the dis
honesty of the homesteaders who had
bilked her out of her money. She
had loaned an average of $500 per
quarter section, and In time she
found herself the owner through
sheriff's deeds of perhaps fifty quar
ter sections. For ten years she paid
the taxes 'under protest, hoping
ugiunsi. nope jnar, some day she
might be ahle to unload for enough
to reimburse her for her expenses,
though she never expected to tret
hack the Investment. Today she Js
muttiienaenuy ncn ana no longer
weeping. She has sold half of her
holdings at an average of $50 an
The men In charge of the Union
Pacific road owe something to one
of their passenger brakemen. His
name is unknown to the architect.
but this particular brakeman went
west on No. 7 on August 5. No. 7
consists of a long string of Pullmans
and one day coach. Local passen
gers can not ride in the Pullmans,
and on this particularly hot and un
comfortable day the one day coach
was jammed with sweltering hu
manity. It was worse than Noah's
ark could have been. It would have
been a mighty easy task to start a
fuss, for the nerves of men and
women were tightened up to the
breaking tension by the heat and
the crowded condition of the car.
But through it all went that brake
man, witha laugh and a cheering
word that kept things in good hu
mor. He deftly persuaded three
children to sit on one seat to make
room for a couple of adults. He
manipulated suit cases and grips and
bird cages without arousing the ire
of the owners, and made room for
more passengers. He rigged up some
seats in the two vestibules and per
suaded some men to occupy them,
and thus made seats for tired women,
who hoarded the train at the various
stations. Ho just kent coiner. rarUnr-
lng good cheer, and his every appear
ance in tne car seemed to cool the
stifling atmosphere. There are a lot
of people who will never fcnow that
genial brakeman's name who will al
ways rememher him with gratitude.
If that isn't the kind of a man that
railroad managers want to keep track
of, then we don't wantto know any
thing about the railroad business.
A few nights ago the architect
visited with an old friend who is
farming an irrigated farm in west
ern Nebraska. Fifteen years ago
his nearest neighbor was eight miles
distant. The friend remained on
that quarter section hponnao i,
couldn't raise money enough to get
?ll aiJd for five or six years he
didn t raise enough grain to feed his
horses. If it had not been for a
windmill that he thoughtfully pur
chased when he homesteaded he
would have been compelled to walk
out of the country. But he just had
to stay, and in duo course of time
ho caught on to a few things. Ho
bought a few adjoining quarters for
practically nothing, and afterwards
sold them at a profit Today he is
living. His farm residence is five
miles from town. Tho house contains
nine largo rooms, and each ono of
tho four sleeping rooms contains a
lavatory with hot and cold water
There is a bath room that would do
credit to a city mansion. The house
is lighted with gas manufactured on
the premises. A telephone connects
him with the town and with all tho
neighbors 'round about. Just before
tho architect retired for tho night he
called up the wife and babies, 617
miles away as the railroad runs, and
talked with them. The next morn
ing ho arose, and by the time break
fast was eaten the daily papers had
been delivered at the front gate.
About 10:30 a' man came along with
a lot of cream cans and collected
the cream that had been separated
during the morning. Out in the
fields two binders were working on
wheat that was sure to thresh out
thirty bushels to the acre, and grow
ing stacks of second cutting alfatfa
were piling up against the horizon
and alfalfa worth $10 a ton, br.led
and delivered at the railroad live
miles away!
The problem of how to keep tho
boys on the farm seems nearer solu
tion every day. Telephones, daily
papers, all the best magazines, auto
mobiles, hathrooms, gas everything
calculated to make the farm home
attractive may now be found every
where on the once "Great American
Desert."
When the architect was ready to
be returned to town in order that
he might pursue his wandering vay,
his farmer friend cranked up a line
five-passenger car touring machine,
and the trip was made in about ten
minutes. That farmer can start
from, his home, go to town, buy a
few needed articles and get back
home in less time than the architect
can go from his city home to his
work.
Say, isn't'this a wonderful country!
And as young as the architect is
he can remember the time when it
was "The Great American Desert,"
unfit for the habitation of man!
Now and then Damo Nature per
petrates a bully joke on her sub
jects, and this "Great American
Desert" joke was one of her best.
Brain leaks
The worry bug causes a lot of un
necessary trouble.
One of the hardest things in tho
world to do is nothing.
It is often Harder to do right than
it is to refrain from doing wrong.
A baby's cry is the surest way of
causing a pause in the world's rush.
There is something wroner ahout
a man when it is necessary to make
him good hy law.
A man can not understand why a
woman has to take so many clothes
with her when she goes visiting.
Arithmeticians have not yet fig
ured out the number of ways a girl
has of showing a new diamond ring.
If some successful huslness men
were as crooked in their business as
they are in their politics they woufa
soon land in jail.
Some of these days we'll be rich
enough to have an old-fashioned rag
carpet on the floor of a room that
is our very own.
Marriage is not a failure in tho
case of the -man who isn't afraid to
talce a friend home for dinner with
out first notifying his wife.
It makes us mad to see somo lazy,
well-fed animal trainer bow and
smile when we applaud the intelli
gent efforts of the animal.
Your shadow is always behind you
when you face the sun. Your
troubles will be behind you if you
turn your face to the future.
-r
.
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