The commoner. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-1923, May 15, 1908, Image 1

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The Commoner.
WILLIAM J. BRYAN, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR
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. VOL. 8, NO. 18
Lincoln, Nebraska, May 15, 1908
Whole Number 382
INSTRUCT YOUR DELEGATES
- ; TO THE NATIONAL CONVENTION
Instructions to delegates are the order of the day. Nearly all the states which have held
democratic conventions, so far, have instructed. This is as it should be ; instructions are
democratic. The people speak through instructions they can not speak in any other way.
A failure to instruct turns the delegates over to party bosses.
CONTENTS
M A BOSTON EXAMPLE
PLEADING WITH THE SPEAKER
PULP, SOPHISTRY AND PLAIN FACT
CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS
RAILROADS PRIVATE PROPERTY? '
"REPUBLICANS IN PERIL"
STUDY PUBLIC QUESTIONS
TAINTED NEWS
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" HOME DEPARTMENT; '';
v WHETHER COMMON OR NOT
NEWS OF THE WEEK
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"WHO'S WHO?"
The Kansas City Journal has an editorial
denying that money is being used to prevent
Mr. Bryan's nomination. It says "Who would
spend money to defeat Bryan's nomination?
Certainly not the trusts or railroads." It Is un
fortunate for the Journal that this editorial
came out just about the time when Mr. Ryan
was admitting upon the witness stand that the
Metropolitan Street Railway company, of New
lYork, contributed half a million to politics in
1900 and that a part of it was used in th'e effort
to prevent Mr. Bryan's nomination that year.
The Journal says that the trusts and the rail
roads are not against Mr. Bryan's nomination,
and yet the fact that Mr. Ryan and the Journal
are opposed to Mr. Bryan's nomination is a com
plete answer to the Journal's own statement.
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"ALAS, POOR YORICK!"
I
SO THE EYE MAY SEE
An Elgin National watch, seven jewels, in
an open-face twenty-year gold-filled case costs
the American retailer of watches $10.75, which
may be represented by a line thus:
This same watch is sold to the dealer in Eng
land for the sum of $7.41, which may be rep
resented by a line thus:
The American purchaser is therefore compelled
to pay, in addition to the dealers' regular profit
thirty-seven per cent more for an American made
watch than the English customer is compelled
to pay, which may be represented by this:
Paid by American purchaser.
Paid by English purchaser.
The American watch trust is enabled to
thus rob the American consumer by reason of,
the protective tariff.
Why delay tariff revision? -- "
A BOSTON EXAMPLE
The president in his recent message gives
an illustration of trust methods. He tells of
Boston's experience with a combination which
secured control of the market. He says:
"Allegations are often made to the effect
that there is no real need for these laws look
ing to the more effective control of the great
corporations, upon the ground that they will
do their work well without such control. I
call your attention to the accompanying copy
of a report just submitted by Mr. Nathan
Matthews, chairman of the finance commission,
to the mayor and city council of Boston, relat
ing to certain evil practices of various corpora
tions which have been bidders for furnishing
to the city iron and steel. This report shows
that there have been ' extensive combinations
formed among the various corporations which
have business with the city of Boston, includ
ing for instance, a carefully planned combin-.
ation embracing practically all the firms and
corporations engaged In structural steel work In
New England. This combination included sub
stantially all the local concerns, and many of
the largest corporations in the United States,
engaged in manufacturing or furnishing struc
tural steel for use In any part of New England;
It affected the states, the cities and towns, the
railroads and street railways, and generally all
persons in that section of the country. As re
gards the city of Boston, tho combination re
sulted in parceling out tho work by collusive
bids, plainly dishonest, and supported by false
affirmation.
"I have submitted this report to the de
partment of justice for thorough investigation
and for action if action shall prqve practicable.
"Surely such a state of affairs as that above
set forth emphasizes the need of further federal
legislation, not merely because of the material
benefits such legislation will. secure, but above
all because this federal action should be part,
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