The commoner. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-1923, May 17, 1907, Image 1

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The Commoner.
WILLIAM J. BRYAN, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR
VOL. 7. No. 18.
Lincoln, Nebraska, May 17, 1907.
Whole Number 330.
CONTENTS
REPUBLICAN ADVICE
LINCOLN'S DEMOCRATIC MAYOR
TAFT THE REFORM CENTER
IS THIS REFORM?
' THE INDEPENDENCE LEAGUE
. SEEKING CENTRALIZATION
SERVING TWO MASTERS
EASILY ANSWERED.
INITIATIVE AND REFERENDUM
LETTERS FROM THE PEOPLE
WASHINGTON LETTER
COMMENT ON CURRENT TOPICS
HOME DEPARTMENT
WHETHER COMMON OR NOT
-NEWS OF THE WEEK'-
--
MOLLYCODDLE .. . ,
In defending his department .from the
charge of inactivity, Attorney Genej-al Bonaparte
says:' "The 'work of the department increases
every day, and I do not' helleve it "ha ever re
ceived more zealous and faithful attention, thahW--
Ji-' 1 A .11- . rr. . ' - '.
it receives ikjw irom me omcers anu employes 01
the department, with the exception, of course,
of the attorney general himself. I do not indeed
consider it any part of the department's duty
to furnish a liberal daily supply of headlines,
for newspapers, and the department is not ad
ministered with that laudable end In view."
What can the attorney general mean by "a
liberal daily supply of headlines for newspa
pers?" Does he mean to intimate that other
departments of the Roosevelt administration are
operated with that end in view? If he does
mean that Mr. Bonaparte might as well pack his
grip and prepare to join the mollycoddles.
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"IS THIS REFORM, MY LORD?"
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REPUBLICAN ADVICE )
oooo
LINCOLN'S DEMOCRATIC MAYOR
Mayor Francis W. Brown, who for two
years past has held the office of chief executive
of Lincoln, has been re-elected. Mr.
Brown is a democrat, and while Nebraska's
capital "city is republican on a partisan
vote, the democrats of the city are feeling
quite jubilant over Mayor Brown's re-election.'
While Mr. Brown's victory is largely a personal
one, still the vote shows a very material gain in
democratic strength. It need scarcely be added
that Mr. Bryan is enjoying the election returns.
Mayor Brown was one of the leaders of the
movement which took a Nebraska delegation to
New York to meet Mr. and Mrs. Bryan on their
return from abroad, and as the readers of The
Commoner will remember, the mayor presided
T at the Lincoln reception. The Commoner pro
poses the health of Mayor Brown, Lincoln's dem-
- ocratic executive.
OOOO
"WHAT ABOUT THE "FOREIGNER?"
Speaker Cannon addressed the Illinois legis
lature' jecently, and in the course of his remarks
said: "You will recollect that in the sessjon of
congress that was lately adjourned, we appro
priated for public service for the coming twelve
months upwards of $900,000,000. Andthis vast
, sum is gathered up by Indirect taxation that
, most of us fail to realize we pay when we do
pay it. Every time we smoke a cigar we pay the
- lax. On most article;, that we get from abroad
wo pay the tax."
But heretofore Mr. Cannon and other re
publican leaders have told us that "the foreigner
pays the tax."
It is interesting to read the advice which
republicans are now giving to the democrats. It
recalls the ear.ly months of 1904. The demo
cratic party was at that time the recipient of a
great deal of unsolicited advice from republi
cans, and it was all along the same line. The
democrats were assured that their defeats were
attributable to radicalism and that they could
strengthen their party by a return to conserva
tive doctrines. They were not promised victory,
of course not, but the republican edi'ors were so
anxious to have a strong, virile organization to
fight that we were assured that the republican
party was becoming careless because it had no
effective opposition and that it would really be
good for the country to have the democratic
party almost, but not quite, strong enough to
win a victory. It would keep the republican
party on its good behavior, make it careful about
its conduct, etc. This kind of. advice was given
in unstinted measure, and it was followed. We
had an eminently respectable candidate; he had
the confidence of the business interests, and his
campaign was conducted upon thoroughly con
servative lines, and then the republicans sat
back and laughed at the success of their scheme
as they counted up a majority almost too large
for figures.
Now the same game is being tried again.
The republican editors are again pleading, for
the democratic party; they are weeping over its
supposed decreptitude. Well, it is bad enough
for the republican editors to advise us. There
is possibly some excuse for them. The presi
dent is not taking their advice in the manage
ment of the republican party, and they feel that
they are entitled to advise some organization,
but it is adding insult to Injury to have advice
picked out a democratic candidate and gave him
a boost. Here is a sample of liis advice:
"There is no way under heaven and among
men whereby this country will trust the demo
cratic party again with power In all- the
branches of the government, until there is a
radical reformation in the principles of the
party and the personnel of its leaders. What
good would come of carrying tho southern states
for a democratic candidate in 1908 with such
accidental victories in other states as might pos
sibly occur? The great body of the electorate
is dead against the democratic party as it stands
today, and it must have a guarantee of principle
and not a guarantee of opportunity.
"How is a better result to be brought
about? A republican of unfaltering faith In his
party, and a lack of faith in tho democratic
party, ought not, perhaps, to give any advice,
and surely his advice will not be counted as of
any value by our democratic friends. Never
theless, it would be the part of wisdom for the
democratic party to turn Its back upon tho past,
with a single statement to tho people of tho
country as follows: 'We have tried aTrtrmber
of experiments and they have failed. We will
now retreat from the disorder of the skirmish
lino, which has been so fatal to us on so many
occasions, and fall back to the Interior line of
democratic ideas, principles and history. We
will 'demand that the politics of the ancient do
mocracy, so far as they are applicable today,
shall be adopted as the cardinal principles of
latter day democracy. It shall have those funda
mental ideas reiterated, the abandonment of
which has led us "so far into the wilderness of
defeat and demoralization. We will enact a
platform embodying leraocratic principles; we
from General Charles H. Grosvenor "the sage ' will adopt democratic ideas upon every living
of Athens," as the Cincinnati Enquirer calls him. topic pf today's politics and we will ask the peo
The Enquirer found him at the Sinton hotel. He pie of this country to retrace their steps from
II