The commoner. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-1923, October 13, 1905, Image 1

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The Commoner.
WILLIAM J. BRYAN, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR
Vol. 5. No. 39
Lincoln, Nebraska, October 13, 1905
Whole Number 247
CONTENTS
.- They're Worried in Ohio
Tub Guilty Must Solve It
Question of Location .
Line Plainly Dr wn
Give the People Rklief
The First Crime
An Income Tax, Too
An Effective Example
Bark Lantern Methods
WnEN the Boat Has Touched Shork
Comment on Current Topics
The Primary Pledge
News of the Week
THEY'RE WORRIED IN OHIO
They are worried in Ohio Foraker is gray with
fear,
They are worried in Ohio Herrick sees defeat
is near.
And the wholebig bunch of bosses Jtrjam the, small
est up, to Cox . .
See the o. p. ship drifting on the sharp and
cruel rocks.
They are worried 'in Ohio Foraker doth now
avow
That the president is urging democratic meas
ures now.
And the railroads say it also, and it's backed up,
too, by Dick
They are worried in Ohio and it makes the
bosses sick.
They are worried in Ohio they have beat the
straddlebug.
They are worried in Ohio Herrick will fall down
ker-chug!
For while standing on the record made up by
the president ! ,'
They declare he's much mistaken when on reg
ulation bent.
They are "wet" among the drinkers and are
"dry" among the dry;
On two stools they have their .optics and to sit
on both they'll try.
But when they attempt reclining on the two
they'll fall between
They are worried in Ohio cogs are gone from
the machine.
They are worried in Ohio Cox complains of
"throwing, mud."
They are worried in Ohio Foraker is sweating
blood.
Dick is working like a Trojan, Herrick smiles
a sickly smile,
And the gang of greedy grafters are in terror
all the while.
"Stand by Roosevelt!" they're shrieking; "Don't
swap horses in the stream!"
"You must stand pat on the tariff!" O, it's
fun to hear them scream.
But the democrats are busy showing up the doc
tored books
Got 'em worried In Ohio and it scares the Coxite
crooks.
W. M. M.
"Can the democratic partv be trusted?" quer
ies a republican exchange. The answer depends
upon whether the question Is asked from the
standpoint of the men mixed up in the insurance
game or from the standpoint of the people who
foot the bills. If by the former the answer is
an emphatic negative.
AN OHIO PUZZLE
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OHIO VOTER-"Now how can I stand by Roosevelt and keep off
democratic ground?"
THE GUILTY MUST SOLVE IT
"Suppose," asks the Minneapolis Journal, a
republican newspaper, "that President Roosevelt
determines that that $48,000 shall bo returned to
the New York Life, who is going to return i?"
Is it but of place to say that that is a ques
tion for the conscience stricken?
The fund might be made up by small con
tributions from every member of the party. Or
it might be completed by a popular subscription
to which we have no doubt many democrats who,
while feeling no responsibility, would bo glad to
contribute by way of helping their republican
friends out of the hole.
At all events, when stolen money has been
located and the necessity for its return has been
generally recognized, the burden of devising the
means whereby the stolen property Is to be re
placed falls upon those who took it, and those
who profited by the theft.
THAT FOREIGN TRADE
"There are many reasons," exclaims the Mil
waukee Sentinel, "why American manufacturers
have been able to build up a foreign trade."
To bo sure. With an undue profit at home,
with the advantage of skilled American mechanics
and the best and most modern machinery, why
shouldn't tho American manufacturer bo able to
build up a foreign market? But if the American
manufacturer can pay ocean freights and under
sell the foreigner In the foreigner's own market,
why should the American manufacturer fear the
competition of the foreigner in American mar
kets with ocean freights in his favor? If the
American steel rail maker can make and ship
rails to Liverpool and sell them at a profit for
$18 a ton and he does why should ho be glyen
tho benefit of a tariff law,- that enables him to
charge tho American consumer $27 a ton?
A QUESTION OF LOCATION
While Mr. Bryan Is In the Holy Land, he
should not fall to locate the spot where Judas
got his thirty pieces of silver, and erect a mon
u it there. St. Louis Globe-Democrat (republican).
In the meantime woulJ it not be well for the
republican national committee to return to tho
policyholders of the New York Life Insurance
company the 148,000 pieces of silver already lo
cated by the testimony of John A. McCall.
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