The Alliance-independent. (Lincoln, Nebraska) 1892-1894, July 13, 1893, Page 6, Image 6

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TI1E ALLIANCE -INDEPENDENT.
JULY 13, 1892 t
1 1
it:
II
1
a
MACHINES OF WAR.
THE GREAT MUSEUM OF WAR
FARE AT CHICAGO.
Out tra4 at Baiktr BUL Yorktawa
d fort Sassier aad e Oaee That
Ara Tat ta Ba Ptra4 for Caase Ma-
aiflceat Waapoaa.
NCIRCLIJfU THE
central division of
kt ha spat e occupied
'by the War Depart
ment in the Gov
eminent Building
at the World a r v,
la a frinir of' old
guns. All ape black
with wV, or red-
-oened with rust
runy weapons are
they when eon'
treated with the
Mat tweiTe-lnch rifle. Insignificant,
P3
ft YEJ
when. Tierwed with, but a paaslnfr
' glance. Yet any one of them could
tell, were its month gifted with
. speech, more of the glory and sorrow,
the pomp and horror, the pride and
despair, oi war, than all the line new
armament of the nation.
Sometime on of the girl at the
- cartridge machine will top her work
- to eall the attention of a visitor to
these silent memorial. Comparatively
few, however, seem to care for what
war was, because of interest in what
war will be should it come. The vet
ran hunt up their old comrades, bow-
80TCBKISS
MOUNTAIN
PACK
MULE.
aver, and fraternize with them, for
these old guns and a stand of battered
musket are full of interest to men
with memories of thirty years ago.
At the southwestern corner of the
inclosure is seen the gun that fired the
first shot at Fort Sumter. Most peo
SI regard this as being the first shot
red during the war. - Even if, a is
aid, some on down in Texas burnt
powder previously, this old cannon
opened active hostilities. It la a four
pounder, mat with a bras or
bronz eagle In a center. It is un
mounted. A i companion piece to
this old canar- s gun that fired the
last shot ai . the r' derate
force. Thia is a wrought- '.ifleof
three-inch bore. It '15
pounds. It record is '' ... ie
last shot at the battlu t hi ox
Court House, prior to the surrender of
Lee's army in 188ft. - It was the left
piece of Elder's Battery, Battery B,
First United States Artillery.
Of the other old cannon, one 1 a
bronza English flint lock with three
inch bore.
There is a Chinese breech loader of
the fourteenth century, a standing
monument of the adage, "There is
nothing new under the sun." There
1 displayed also veteran of the Mex
ican war in a bronze six-psunder. The
bronze French gun Lafnyette pre
sented to the United States is also in
the exhibit, and others, IncluJing a
gun the British forces surrendered at
Yorktown. A novelty is an old
fashioned Colt's revolving cannon,
with six shots, the caliber being two
inches.
Relics from battlefields are not
numerous but whatever there is
possesses interest. There is the stump
of an oak tree that was cut down by
musket balls during the battle of
Spottsylvania Courthouse, May 12,
IB04. A wheel is shown with its war
record iu detail. Other relics of the
rebellion are shown in a stand of bent,
shattered and rusted muskets.gathered
from many battlefields. Several have
bullets imbedded in the metal of the
barrels. There are specimens cf the
balls fired from Fort Sumter on April
13. 18U.
To mark clearly the difference be
tween what is thought warlike to-day
and the weapons of the past, an ex
hibit of modern arms is made in close
Sroxiraitv to the old guns just
escribed. In an upright case are
models of most of the famous European
makes; not all, however, of the latest
model. A Martini-llenrv is an uirlv
look ins weapon, with a sword bayonet
wttn saw-teeth on on side. The
Springfield breech loader, model of
Wi, is shown with a trowel bayonet.
lMc aREcmtoAMMi Aar atria,
t.f nrvt-Two Toss,
It ha Wa ta aim of the guv vr mural
to shew the ad vin la ga wskinf
fnwa tha tr lt time lo th prnt
That tats and way be attained, vm the
east wall of the buUJl u arrangad
atari of ad guns, wkleh w..rs j
through the raaUrUs, fatal nf the
am lust drfttbed, ta the sauat went
saudvls, wakaarearrsagadtwawalaBt
fur hsnvlliHf v a hot t.aul idalfurnt
Ti e 4dat of all U a Cata whl-
pit4. Nasi wmm aa Arabia
saswalovk. Thar It a aiutli-bur
taaUaUn-k 1 the fiHrtaaaih cautury
"" "via-aij wuhi mi rtR vl 134U,
The trvwt of the dial kit, !atd
la tha slsiaih caaiar, w shoa.
Asi AIMsa ia uaat aad a An Arabian
i, wit a barral fully sis tvm Ung,
Ukkuwa. Thi Is a msUaU U
Udta, a lUaJi kold lKka ef all t at
:
teres, ndmen of swivel gun and a
table of shot of all kinda Specimen
of glass cannon balls are shown, chain-
shot that baa seen service, ana a curi
ous contrivance called a turbine shot.
which is cylindrical and has a hole
passing through the tenter. Among
these relics is a little r rench howitzer,
mounted on a stand wh'.ch would
make an interesting paper-weight, but
in modern warfare would be insignifi
cant.
Of the recent arias, the Krag-Jor-genson,
approved, for service in the
army of the Unied States, is of great
est interest fn the exhibit of the
patent office is shown the approved
gnu or Me model of February 21, 1893.
Tbt tran is of thirtv caliber, sighted
for 2.000 vards. and adapted to the uae
t of smokeless powder. The barrel is
thin, it having been found unneces
sary to use the cooling jacket that was
lormerlv thought necesaary. Ine
breech block has a double motian and
can be removed and thrown away on
pressing ine trigger fully home, so
that the piece can be rendered useless,
u it owner is obliged to discard It
"The 'clip,' or repeating reservoir.
hold five cartridges. From a repeater
me gun can instantly be converted
into a single shot weapon. The new
model has several improvement over
ine oiaer style or Krag-Jorgenson as
used abroad. Patent right will be
secured for the use of the United
state government and the gun man-
afacturad here. Smokeless powder, it
i saia, is a complete success. A
Springfield rifle is shown, caliber
thirty, with thirty-six and one-half
grain of powder, penetration at twenty
vara wa nineteen ana a nail inches
In an oak block, crossing the grain.
and twenty-four and a half inches
going with the grain. The Springfield
rifle wa selected for the test, to prove
that gun now in use can be converted
and used without danger from the
rapid ignition of the powder. The
most recent models of European coun
tries are an or tno same trcneral tvoe
as that of the gun approved for use in
tne country, smokeless powder is fa
vored, the use of small calibers, and
the loading "cUp" entering the lock
from aide or bottom appearing in all
the rifle.
ui moaern oranance tner are manv
tM a . .
examples, Noticeable are the rapid-
firing guns. Of these the most
numerous are of the llotchklss type.
duns of this make are caliber ed for
balls running from ehrht nonnds to
tuirtv-inree Dounas. nttinar a four.
Inch caliber. For the field there i a
piece throwing a ball weighing 13.3
pound 6.000 yard with a charo-e of
mokeless powder, the initial velocity
oemg 9,200 reet per second. For naval
nse a fine rifle ia made to throw a
three-Inch fifteen-pound ehell 5.000
ABUT DErABTMENT IB THE 60VEBffafMT
BUILDIHG.
yards. There are nvdranlla cvllnrWa
to take up the recoil and a shoulder
wnereov the irunner can a m ami hu.
cnarge his piece. From ten to twelve
shots per minute can be fired. Small
pieces are made for use in mountain
warfare, ao arranged that thev nun ha
carried on pack animals. They are
shown In the War Denarr. mAnt.
mounted on mules. Some of the
uotcn kiss guns are exhibited on th
man-of-war on the lake shore east of
the government building, while the
company has a special exhibit in the
transportation building. 11
shown a stand of shells, with card-
board Imitations of the new smokeles
powder. One of the beht of the, rmval
guns fires seventy-one pound shells
per minute.
.the big twelve-inch rifln
much attention from visitors. This
gun weiirhs fiftv-two ions. . r.
jectlle weighing l.uOO pounds, the
cuarue or powder being 450 pounds.
Its length 1h thirty -six and a half feet
and it cost the government 852,000. It
was manufactured at the Watervliet
arsenal at v est Trov. N. Y. Thi.l.
vjie largest gun made in Anierk
mere is also a United States eight-
juvii urcei-11 loaning steel rule on serv
ice carriage.
WILLIAM E, QUINBY.
Skotch of tha Nw Amnrlraa
to tha Ktherlau4s.
Minister
tor the next four years the United
States will lie represented at th
.-etnerianus- capital by one of Amer
ica s mot distinguished journalist,
11 imam c uiuuj,
editor and chief
owner of the le
trx.it Free I'resa.
When Mr, Qulnby
became connectel
with the Freel'reta
In 1M1, that ppr
was suffering from 't
the vacuum crested f
Chii-airo of Wilbur V
F. Story.tha XesU.r "Kvlsf
of Watrn tourual
Ism, Though a waLUMi.vviar.
young man he had well doflaeU Idea
otMhai a uewapapar should te; h
had tmlMeil aa Ideal and at one aa
aoui to nrtKiuce lla eouatercart Th
papar had Uera aggrvaatvaly partisan
ia IU taadenoy. This spirit wssulcaly
cartel by tha aw helaiamaa and th
pubtkatton oa had th vaa.Uac
sud rvsfXKt of th Ppl of th Mat
trrvsim-tW of bariv. For all that is
food sad pur U Asnarkaa )omaU
isw ta 1 rv rras stands a a salu a
ttanipU of th lt ptiaaibUUiaa. Mr.
yuiaty U a astiv of th tt
.nam a a. 1 ena ui a,wi okl Yaakaa
Uaagv Th avtiv uaaginal of
his tNivr will daVMlv w. Ms two a as
Juring hiMijatra aWa4
A taS atia.
A maa ws triad tar tatft at il tti.
rara uhim. fb rorvmaa f th Jary,
was (ivieg ta dU , a4 a saia
l sad saivl -ot gaillr" UtWad f
"g winy." i noagit A w uhed U tl.
fi U wlMak aa wvmtl not da a, t4
Iks mat wa lts4 trm saivnly.
WING SHOTS.
V J. A, EOOHTOK.
The Question now is. ha the tariff
question passed Into a state of inocuour
aesuetuder
me Kothchllds only nave one more
nation to conq uer America. Can they
wnquer nerr
- -
as
It has at last been discovered what
baa become of the tariff They've rot
it in vnio to nght tneir campaign on.
It is said that Gov. Stone, of Missouri
got Into a fight the other day. Weal
way thought that this Stone was a hard
one.
Man can only work a small nortlon of
we ume. ue must sleep, be most eat.
he must rest But Interest work every
nour, nigni ana asy. week day ana Sua
day, winter and summer.
a
A man in this city inserted an ad in a
unicago bunaaypaper lor a room. Ua
the succeeding Tuesday he had received
601 replies. There is nothing like
advertising m this world.
The price of coal continue to rise.
the price of wheat continues to fall. In
one case prices are forced up by a trust,
In the other tbey are forced down by a
conspiracy. In both cases the farmer
sutlers.
Jim Belford in a recent speech at
Denver, said, "there is coin? to be a
fight over the silver question as sure as
God made little apples." Belford is the
man who said somewhat earlier in bis
career, if I owaed Texas and h 11, I
ouia rent out Texas and live in h 11.
( 1 1 1
Ex Secretary Foster has snnken. TT
ha elucidated a grett mystery. He
says the tariff has more to do with the
present panic than anyhody would
imagine. If he will now explain how
the tariff caused his bank account to be
overdrawn 1136,000 he will confer
favor upon humanity.
Grover Cleveland Is a (Treat fisherman.
He fishes on decoration day, he fishes on
the fourth of July; he fishes in season
and out of season. But when he begins
angung witn mat extra session bait. ft
may catch a whale, and, then like a cer
tain other historical character, he will
yearn lor somebody to help him let go
The plute papers are wailing. ' O if
there were only more confidence in the
country, everything would be all right.'
I that so? Well, the way to have con
ndenc is to have something for it to
rest on. Confidence does net create
conditions, but is created by conditions.
it is nam 10 nave a maximum of con
fidence on a minimum of currency.
t
The republican politicians are blow
log loudly that the cause of the panic is
that we have a democratlo administra
tion. Yet the democratic administra
tion hasn't done a blessed thing but
change a few postmasters and call
an extra session of congress. If little
things cf that nature can cause a panic
our finances must be in a shaky condi
tion indeed.
If J. Sterling Morton don't ouit ret
ting himself Interviewed on subjects
that he doesn't know any more about
than the law allows, he will soon find
hlraself occupying a position similar to
that of another noted NebraskanMr.
George Francis Train. If Nebraska
could be represented at the World's fair
by J. Sterling, George Francis and
uunaio William, wouldn't she fain a
blooming reputation.
Col. Calhoun eavs in the last Issue of
the Lincoln Herald, that if Cleveland is
using the public patronage for a club to
beat democratic coDfressmen into line
for the repeal of the Sherman law. he
will go down to posterity the most des
pised men who ever sat in the presiden
tial chair." if be is: Don't you know
he is, Bro. Calhoun? Take your own
case, for Instance, or most any other
case in sight. What is the use of beat
ing tne devil around the bushr
The World-Herald tells of a married
couple in this city who did not live to
gether in that peace and haimony that
snouia mark the conjugal relation. One
day vthen the man was asleep the
weman concluded sbe would ret rid of
him. Taking an old butcher knife she
tried to cut his throat. The knife was
dull and the sawing woke the man up.
"Here," he said, "if you want to kill me
I want you to sharpen that knife
While she was whetting the instrument
the roan concluded he didn't want to
die alter all and knocked her on the
cad with a club.
a
The love which th renublican papers
01 iM orama show t our republican
governor 1 really pathetic. II has
been called all the names in the vocabu
lary from traitor down. He has been
abm ed, he has been traduced, he has
been denounced. He ha been asked to
resign, he has been told that he was
dUgrau to the state: that ha was
Catholic; that h was a mugwump; that
ivwiiivi m win, viu., viy, , Shi
lBOnltum. Total notheriwuu 1st ore
diction varitled. W told t ra all about
Crouaae before they electid htm. But
toey wouiuat twllev it And Bow
every little republican editor la th
state la making face at him. Well,
our cvniclence Is clear. We did all la
our power to preveatth calamity, But
it availed not. They elected hint. ow
let 'cm tak their iucdtcla.
lor th ,uarUr eadleg June 30 the
failure la the I'alWtl Put lumber
a agalast 1U for th second
auarWr of lor the Ural six
moat hi of Htath failure number .
tol, iral d t J ur la ta same tw rlod
la 1 show Is if aa Increase l vi Th
total liabilities of ail ta failure mnr
rift la th first ' tutataa tkf Ivxi ara
IUvMMi.U'Cs hl! for U same period
I luj thev w.ia t' l UUia shawl
an Ut rae t lul.CuVXO,
The 81 CbarUs hotel at th foot of
O btrvat I 0 nuwt taru'ar farmer s
heus la Llavo!, Ualt II ou a day,
lubacrlhe for TmC AUUC!mpb
'
Altgeld Study of Criminal Juris
prudence.
By his pardon of the anarcnlsts Gov
ernor Al'geld of Illinois has become
national character. His position before
the public can hardly be said to be an
enviable one, but some recent investiga
tions Indicate that Altgeld ha been in
put yars quite a student Of criminal
Jurisprudence,
it may be said that the press has nnl
versally condemned Altgeld, but in the
great majority the criticisms have been
more on the fact that Altgeld extended
the pardon as an act of justice rather
than an act of mercy. In 17.0C0 words
he arraigned the court and court of
ficials for unfairness and came very near
completely exonerating the aaarchists
from all blame.
The sentiments expressed by Altgeld
in his statements of "reasons for pardon"
has led to an investigation of his Senti
ment record."
Altgeld was at one time a judge of
Chicago court He was the author of a
book entitled "Our Penal Machinery
and Its Victims."
In this book Author Altgeld says
Our penal machinery Is Immense, cost
ly, and Its victims are counted by mil
lions, but strange to say. the feeling is
spreading that somehow or other it does
not protect society. It does not teem to
be a success. It does not deter the young
onenaer, ana it seems not to reform nor
M a a . -
restrain the old offender. One is natur
ally led to ask whether there is not
something wrong with the system,
whether it ia not based on a mistaken
principle, whether it is not a great mill
which somehow or other supplies its
own grist, a maelstrom which draws
from the outside and then keeps its vic
tims moving in a circle until swallowed
In the vortex. For it seems first to
make criminals out of many who are not
naturally so, and second, to render it dif
ficult for those once convicted to aver
be anything else but criminals, and third.
to fall to repress those who do not want
to be anything but criminals.
-ine truth is," tald Author Altgeld,
'our penal machinery seems to recruit
its victims irom among those who are
fighting an unequal fight In the strurele
for existence."
He maintained that the manner in
which arrests are made by police officers
rather than Inspiring respect for the
penal machine, prompted hatred. Of
the 82,800 people arrested in Chicago,
said Mr. Altgeld, In the ear, 10,743
were difebarged by police magistrates,
to tav nothing of those against whom
the grand jury returnel no bill. These
men, be declared, were marched through
the streets.some were clubbed, some band
cuffed and nearly all were treated gruffly.
At the police station their names went
down in the prison records and tbey
were all thrown Into Jail. Be argued
that every one of these would feel the
Indignity and have a natural aversion to
the "machine" so long as they lived.
Then Mr. Altgeld said:
mcreaibie as it may seem we now
dally take thousands who are not crimi
nals and subject them to every kind of
degredatlon and de what we can to de
stroy their self-respect and send them
irom caa to worse, and when they finally
land in the penitentiary, we discover
that in order to restore them to society
we must undo everything we have done.
ar. Augeiapavocatea "indeterminate
sentences" having the maximum length
of confinement fixed by law. Then pris
oners should be sentenced generally,
leaving the actual length of their con
finement to ce determined by their good
behavior.
He favored the abolition of the grand
ury. . Courts, he said, should always be
open to the trials of criminals, who
should be prosecuted on information so
that a trial should take place Immedi
ately after the offense had been com
mitted. "The speedy trial." said the
author "la what. thA omilt.v IviitiilMo.l "
In 18X5 Mr. Altgeld delivered an ad
dress bcfoie the National Prison Reform
association at Detroit In which he argued
against wholesale imprisonment of peo
ple for violation of city ordinances. At
that time Mr. Altgeld said:
As we have been trying the crushing
policy wun unsatisfactory results, let us
dlnpense with a little of the brute force
and try a system of development which
while it will protect society better than
tne present system, win also make U at
least possible for the accused to come out
with more character, moral strength and
self-respect than he had when tiiken into
custody.
It the purpose of the searchers of Alt
geld's "sentiment record" has been to
show that he is a sympathizer with an
arcby, that purpose has failed so far as
"Uur renal .Machinery and Its victims"
is concerned..
The words which the author has ut
tered concerning the "penal machine"
will be Indorsed by thousands of think
ing peeple. That there la something
wrong with that machine Is demonstrated
every day In every city in every state in
the union. The poor wretch who has
stolen a loaf of tread or seeks shelter In
box car tr stands in rag upon the street
corner is hurried off to a svll. But toe
maa who has robbed widows and orphans
01 inousanu is piacea unaer guara at the
best notei.
Pullce authority mut necessarily be
arbitrary to a uegree, out tneie ia a
chanc for a decided Improvement loth
lerrlsa of that authority.
Judring by hi "sen timet! reord"Mr.
Altgeld U a man who having closely ob
served th oiwretloo of th "penal ma
chine," ha iMHimi disgusted with Its
many defect. Th JaJuJidous uessag
which amarnl4 th narvkm of tha
aaanklats was probably th oukvm f
a fia aeai 01 tMouiaf oa lb part of
Mr. Altgeld. It will I reuiembamd
that during th rtnt ioa of ih It lb
nl fittur Gotarnor AUl4 caused
fc b Intiudui'td bill Providier for furv
trial lo ail case before a utaa could l
sentenced. JuJvL la the light of all
thaa talof It U fair lo prutu that
Uovet a Alta-aid I a maa stroaIy
ad of a thoroughly cvtm ientMis (da.
Thwufl4 1 marviUas hiwTe, In It
rrltkUw a4 Uoveretw A!tld Mht
havd0 ballet had a pardt aed Ih
enarvaUt without a word of u.iiitke.
U time Ml sat when th atUoa
tf th men tacNtalv wmad justify th
patvtt'a. 111a utarary effort cou.i
ell bee rmJ ! tha tutut wh
It ms hsv ttood a a crthviul Vi
oi I Vaal ?i iwaa and It VkUta."
Wm Herald.
TaatTm iuimaii'triaiNT
PATEIT
JL
SOLICITORS.
SUES & CO., JSSSim.
Four ycar't cxpsricoce ss moma in th U. 8.
Pstent office. Ajlvice ie. m fee until the ftstrnt
beklauicd.
. Cm. II S Mtift HU K C. H. . kk. A
Trtm.. laillU. rcdtlm mmmtt (ralww. V PaV
THE KIRKW00D
Steel Wild Engine
Hss beaa In ass sine 1882. It
M ta PI0HUK BTttl MILL. U
aas BCAun. tlMHQTH, DU
BiUif, POWER; H is ma nest;
uence uia mui zor yon to tuj
Thoosans's hav them I
Out Otl foweri
Have 4 snslestael corner pon s
substanUsl steal sirts sud
braces; not fence wire. Tbey
are LIGHT, SJHOtlO. 8IUPLC iM
C0H8WUCTI0H, mucb enest
ins wood ana will last a Ufa
time I Onr mills and towers are
ALL 8TKEL and ar FULLY
OUARANTsEU. Writ for
prices snd clrculsrs. Address.
MsnuoBiDg ui s paper.
IIRKWC33 WIXO ENGINE CO..
ArhanaaaClty, Kanaa.
Adjustable!
WAHWANTfCD
Sold direct lo school officers.
Circulars free. Addict,
Adjustable School
Seat Maafg Co,
MARCELLU8, MICH
LAUNimriNG 8111KTS MADE EAST.
kl. With Orewiler's Spring snd
sblrt front Is stretched by
springs as tight ss a drum
bead sod as straight ss s
ribbon, while you are Iron
ing the springs sre pulling.
No wrinkles nor rrookttd
places posHlble. Full In
structions for starching,
Dolishlnir. etc.. with each
board.
1.00.
Bent by ex press on rocHnt of mice.
Agents wanted. cukkwilkk,
Upper Sandusky, Ohio.
INCUBATORS & BROODERS
Brooders nly 18. Best snd Cheapest
for fining Chicks. 40 First Premium..
1200 Tesllmonlsls. Send for Cstsl'g.
U. . MimutM, . CanilawtaMB, J.
Tne Paragon Incubator
Is Doeltivelv tha most rjrsctlesbla an ra.
liable Incubator now before tbe people of tbe
west. "Patronize Home Industry" and get
the best. We dare come before tha nmnia t
the great Nebraska Hut Fair tbls year. Ws
hatched 911 chicks from 121 fertile eggs, after
moving the eggs and machine several miles
Wbe thev were wlthla two dave nt hatf-hlnv
There being so premium offered at tbe fair w
were granted the biobcst award of honor by
tba board of examiners. Bend for circulars
and price list of tbe Incubator, which hatched
tha cblcks at tbe state Fair. Address
O. G. COLLIER.
Box 485, Falrbury, eb.
DEAFNESS.
ITS CAUSES AND CURE,
Scientifically treated bv an aurlst of world.
Wide reputation. Deafness eradicated and en
tirely cured, of from SO to 80 years' standing,
after all other treatments have failed. How
tbe difficulty is reached and tbe cause removed
fully explained in circulars, with affidavits
and testimonials of cures from prominent
people, mailed free.
Dr. A. FONTAINE, Tacoma, Wash.
AGENTS WANTED Male and female
old and young, $15.00 to $25.00 per
day easily made, selllnar our Oueen
Platlnsr Outfits, and dolne Gold. Silver.
Copper and Brass Platting, that la
warranted to wear for years, on every
class of Metal, Tableware and Jewelerv
&c. Light and easily handled, no ex
perience required to operate them.
Can be carried by hand with ease from
house to house, same as a grip sack or
satchel. Agents are making money
rapiaiy. mey fen to almost every
business house and family, work shop
Cheap,durable,simpe and witbln reach
oi every one. Jr'lates almost Instantly,
equal to the finest new work. Send for
circulars &c.
Queen City Sliver & Nickel Plating Co..
East St Louis, IU.
MONEY 3I01NOPOLY
(1st Sdltlou of 6,000 all sold.)
NEW EDITION-ENLARGED. '
190 Pages Heary Paper, How Rtddj.
Price, paper 2S; cloth II 00.
Address Taa AiiuRca Pua. Co., Lincoln, Vb.
"Money Monopoly, by B. R. Bsker, Is pro
aouaeed by reprseontattve leaders !n the rnf.-.nu
eansewbaUie uuei eomprehenalT work ever
uuuauN un uie money aueeiiou. KVery aiaer
Ion backed OD bv Uliln!abla enu,fa 1n.i. ik.
UstllDf gun of wane slavery SKainet pluUn-rsUe
vftfimiuu, iwwa Aiivuue. uen. W sever a ra
per.
CHEAP FM.1 LANDS
100,000 lcrti Jut rut Upon lbs Market I
SOU) on
Small Cash Payments
AMD
5 to 20 Years Time.
For man of Nbraska and further
paritcalans call oa vr aUJr,
STAPLETON LAND COMPANY,
lUBEE BriLDISU, OX A HI, XC1U
ST. JOSEPH BUGGY CO.
si. JiSji.B Huirtr Co.
Carrlars a4
IMftl at Kst rlo, i'atetiosru.
aUJof u.
Meeaaai
oh un irw. t in aoa
8U hi. Jo. Mo.
fOH IAUL
(Hiva!f tnUrvst la aa U4tHaJnl
a,Hirr, clrculaiioa Jhw, oiruiaj
lf w cvuaty la are It r a tart U
ttt. ravsllCuW r iaata aSv
i . iWawia fur sllf, Ua to
it !, A)Jrvw J. ' W, Car
LLUNClfi-llUtriltOtNT.
NaT I a
VHS.I jffT
aaflawak. W I UI
uitmm roofi;:q co.
-'a"i asanuvaoturae in th U. .
Sheet Ire BuIUlnc rlatcrlal
u. rr m a ... ir'i
UMUbiietr.
6L Loula. m Cincinnati.
DOGSdTafpbsT'N8t
lrerhooiul. Bull, Fox, Sky sod Scotch Terriers! i
Collies, r"ug, bpanielt, Beagies, Foxhounds, Sdi
icrs biso roimcrs; sjso rcrreu, sisilese Lets pet
animals, fancy pigeons, poultry. Send stamp for
price un. unr oxet wan lea ;
Hernia Rosea k, SIS afarfcet, St. at lul
oeeeeeoeoeaaaea
TABULC
RCCULATt THE I
STOMACH, UVER AND BOWOS
AND PURIFY THE BLOOD.
RIPAXS TAB LLC ara tha keet (pa!.
beii far laalaceUea, BllteaSieee,
irf weaue uyeaeeeia, Vreala
.m.it viujwn, naaveaiBi
Wreeeierr. VBVaal.e Br ia. mm .
eraere ef (be atemaca, Urer aa Bl
Rlpene Tsbales eoatein aotbins Injn
oum ociioBU MmatituUun. Are pita
take, tuft, vffertuel, end firm Imnwdlale
SV Her be ordered tbroiieb nnuraet dr
ur by mail. Sample free bj Ball. Addrta
THE ROANS CHEMICAL QD.,
19 BKRCCE STREET, VEW VOBK CIVT.
EACLE BRAND THE BItT
ROOFING
s sC5 J
s
s
e
e
e
esueeu
ia ik. a
rfjae to e
tut to
lief.
Uunequaled for House, Burn, Factory or Out- j '
DuuaiDCi sna cot null uie mice of ininir lea. tia t .
or iroa. It is ready lor dm, and easily applied by 1 '
anyone Send atamp (or temples, and atate size oi I
roof. XCaXSIOH FAINT AUOFIMU Co. ! 1
160 Duane at., Nw York, W.Y. r
PATRONIZE
Tbe Only Line Under One Management
raoa
Lincoln to Points Belw.
OAKES FREMONT BlOUICITT
AHKltDEEN OM1HA 8HELIX)N
PIEHKE ' HASTINGS DE8 MONIES
HURON BUPKUIOR MAHSH I.T'WTM
MITCHELL I.TKnOT BOONE
YANKTON .WllVAJJjIv crJNTOW
D1JLUTH V""! MILWAUKEB
siirinr. r ivB g .i i
O8KO8H
OWATO'MA
KAU CLAIRE
MADISON
WINONA
St. Pa
Chicago
MARSHALL "t...TJ FREE PORT
KASOTA AJJU .111X,IjB AliHnp
MAriy I I K
EHCANABA
Wyoming MS
Fast Trains to Chicago and St. Paul.
Clois Commiotioks fob Aix Foimts.
BEST EQUIPMENTSLOWEST RATES
A. 8. Fkldimo, W. M. SBiriiA.
Hy T'kt. Agt. Gen'l. Attt.
Office 1183 O StDepotCor. SaadStbBt.
LINCOLN, NEB.
r
is
ii
ii
hi
' f -
12th and Fa mam sts.
JNCQWINTEDWITH THE GEOGRAPHY OF THIS COUNTta V f
1U0H VALUABLE INFORMATION KM h STUDY W THIS W OF
"u ' Root sod from Cmrinn n-'
ISLAND, PAVSSP08T, ES M0IKE8. COUNCIL
BUFFS. OMAHA. LINCOLN, wmwllf
SIOl'X PALLS, MINNEAFOLia rr
jmwn. ATCUISON, LEAVKNWOBTH. KANSAS
.'1MB Cllll Al.O, CALDWELL. BCTVIIINSOt ZH
w rv (uiUAV a Hall S ar lea . A
HM.AQO, ,lCttItA U4 BVUUIJiKUf.
$0LI3V:STi:UUESlSSTIUIe1$;
r larwua t tMkrhaWa. sllaMittM
I N. e4 tH Aw i4 TTVivki
fl"?SJM? 1ut'' .was uil. sue
W'laJs. lUt ( IL Ml r IIB lltlilll .'a...
Pi rllfl I'tMlt. WkMk4aaA 1imm .1 IU A... A- ..
SMuiMietts, aM kMa .aaaia st UkusoT
ViaTho Albert Ua nouK,
"".T!1." ." Ma ffcinea
IT. IOHM( JOHN LlAITlala.
Seals, Oeatmarash ss
WHIH OA! AND QAIOUNI tNQlNt
?s !:?;?-
i Vf , ILtM A.m ...... u.
rya sMas-aaaiiii u lililllta III 1
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