The Alliance-independent. (Lincoln, Nebraska) 1892-1894, December 01, 1892, Image 6

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WAITING FOR THE ANGELS.
wiiUng through days of fover,
W ilting through nights of pain,
Fr the waft of winjrs at the portal,
For the sound of soups immortal,
Aud the breaking of li.e's long chain.
There is little to do for our dear one
Only to watch aud pray
Jls the tide is outwari drifting.
As the gates of heaven are lifting,
And its gleam is on her way.
The tasks that so often taxed her.
The children she held so dear.
The fctrain of the coming and poinr.
The stress of the mending and sowing,
The burden of many a j j ir, 4
Trouble her now no lontrer.
She is past the fr.-.l aud care.
On her brow is the nuse.'s token,
The look of pease unbroken.
She was never before so fair.
You see, she is waiting tha angels,
-And we wa aro standing apart.
For us there are los aud sorrow;
For her is tho endless morrow.
-Ami the roaping-liun of the heart.
Margaret K. Sacg.rterin Harper's Hazar.
HIS NAME WAS I5K0WN.
Frank Smith and 'oko Mason com
posed the firm of Smith & Muon.
dealers in general merchandise at a
email frontier point in Kansas. ISe
for coon??' to Kansas Frank and Zeke
had mot a younjr lady who was attend
in? school in their home town in Ohio.
The young lady's name wai Grayson,
and, as she was both beautiful and
-accomplished, the young mon fell dos
lporately in love with her.
For several weeks they each paid
attentions to her, and thousrli she
treated them both kindly, it soon be
came evident that she had a decided
preference for Frank.
One night after the trade was over
and the customers had gone away,
Frank said:
' "I received some welcome news to
day." What is it? ' Zoke asked.
I have a letter from a certain liti
tie jlrl you know who- and sho
says she Is coming out to this pai l of
(he country to live."
What!" Zeko exclaimed. "Miss
Grayson coming out here:'''
That's just what she writes in her
letter." Frank replied. 'Says hor
father is somewtiero in this section
now looking up a claim, and as soon
as he gets located and puts up a house
he and the balance of tho family
will come to him. So I supposo
they'll be hero against not fall."
"You will help her fa!her to get a
claim, of course. '' said Zuko.
Why. yes. I'll do what I can for
him. Hut, aside from the river claim
lowa there, I can't figure out any
thing worth having right near this.
The good land is all lakou up except
that one piece and 1 want that my
elf." But you have no right to it. Frank,
nd you can't hold it if some settler
disputes the matter with you.
' "I know that, but I've held it a
year by 'bluffing.' and I'll continue to
hold it that way."
Well you wouldn t attempt to
.."Muff Miss Grayson's father, would
i don t know. I d like to accom
modate him for hor sake, but I'd
rather keep that claim for hor and
, myself."
Just at that moment the clatter of
horse's feet was heard without and
a little later a man rode up to the
tore and dismounted. He was a set
tler from the river district
Why, Jko," said Zeke, "you're
out late to-night!"
Yes said the settler, rath or late.
.But I came after the do tor."
Who's sick?" asked Frank.
"I don't know ihe man. Hs's a
stranger who squatted on the rivor
claim to-day. I was up the river this
afternoon and riding across the claim,
I saw a covered wagon over by the
timber. Ho seemed to bo in a bad
fLx, and I thought ho ought to have a
doctor. "
The doctor had gone out in the
country, but within half an hour he
returned and immediately be and Ike
set off to visit the squatter.
Now that beats tho nation. "
Frank said, as soon as ihey were
gone. "I wonder who the old chap
is that's had the gall to squat on my
laim!"
I don't know." said Zoke. "I
wonder if he's needy?"
Ah! I suppose he is." said Frank,
coldly. "These squatters are nearly
always sick and needy."
"I suspect wo should have gone
down there with Ike and the doctor to
if there wasn'tsomething we could
-do for the man." Zeke said. Like as
.not he is out of provisions."
Well, let him be out ' said Frank.
It isn't my business to trot around
' feeding men who jump my claim. 1 m
going down there to-morrow, but I'm
not going to in juire after his health.
I'm going to givo him orders tc move
on as 60on as he is able to drive."
Do you think Alice Grayson would
1 indorse sucn an act as you pro pose.
Frank?"
Why wouldn't she?"
. .O .. n ...... I.... fnlli.il urns timiU.I.
-situated and someone drove him off.
Do you think 6he would be pieased?"
No-o, I suppose not. Hut tliat'3
different thing."
Not a bit of it. It's just the same
thing, only it would bo a different ox
that was gored."
The next morning the doctor came
to the store soon after it was opened,
and finding Frank and Zeke both
(there, he said:
My squatter patient down the
river is in hard straits, and unless he
has a little assistance for a few days
I am afraid he will hardly get along."
Is he very sick. " asked Zeke.
Yes he is. and besides he's desti
tute. Two or three nights ago he
was robbed by a couple of men of all
of his money, so he hasn't a dollar
or a particle of food. He says he
has Dlentv at home, but it will take
two weeks to hear from there. 1
sent a telegram this morning, noti-
frin? his wife of his condition, and
-BUQ Will J?m ua V1J WUb UWl
What is hi nam?" Frank asked.
Hi name i Brown."
'Frank breathe 1 easier. He had
suspected that tho man might be
Alice's father.
What do you eav. Frank?" Zeke
asked. "Shall we bclji tho man oul
of his difficulty?"
No. I shan't" k rank replied. !
am not responsible for his bal luck,
and beside he has taken my claim.
I'll go to see him after awhile, but
only to do what I said last night. 1
have nothing to rjive him."
Well." said eke, "you have a
right to do as you please."
A few minutes later eke and the
docto
r drove away across the prairie j
io direction of the squatters:
in tho direction of the so
wagon. They found Ike with the
sick man. and as he had remained all i
night he was compelled to go home, j
so cko took his placo and remained
through tho day. j
You haven't seen or heard any
thing of Alice Grayson's father, have
you. I rank?" Zeke questioned one
morning, as he was preparing to visit
the squatter.
No. not a thing. Frame replied.
It scorns queer that I haven't too.
for bo must be somewhere in this sec
tion."
Shortly after Zeke reached thej
wagon that morning, and while he
was preparing1 some breakfast for the
sick man. he saw a carriage ap
proaching, and after the lapse of
nearly an hour it came close enough
for him to discern its occupants.
The doctor was driving, while be
hind him sat two ladies. He waited
until the carriage halted at a little
distance from tho wagon, then going
forward was about to salute tne doc
tor, but suddenly stopped, transfixed
with astonishment. At last he mur
mured: Miss Grayson, is it possible?"
"Indeed it is. Mr. Mason." said a
soft voice, "and I am glad to meet
yon. The doctor has been telling us
how kind you have been to papa, and
now we have an opportunity to thank
you "
1'apa?" eke repeated. "He is
not your father? His name is
Urown."
Ho is my stepfather only," Alice
replied, ' but he is as dear to mo as a
father could bo and you have saved
his life."
Just than a horsemnn rode up and
with one glance into the carriage he
btopped. full of astonishment. The
horseman was Frank and he recog
nized Alice. In a few words the
doctor informed him how matters
were.
Frank blushed and hung his head.
He knew by the coolness of Alico's
greeting that she had no love for
him but ho did not know that the
doctor had informed her of his con
duct toward her father.
Ho learned that later, however,
when, chancing to meet her. he at
tempted to retain hor old-time
friendliness.
"I did think Ilovod you," she said,
"but I find I was mistaken. I'm
srure I never did love you."
Two months later Frank sold out
his interest in the storo and went
furthor West, and a month later still
Zeke and Alice were made man and
wifa Brown kopt the river claim
and built a nico home on it, and now
he has one of the finest farms in the
West. N. Y. Recorder.
Dining Cart.
Dining cars are generally run at a
loss and are attached to trains simply
as a matter or attraction. A steward,
four cooks and five waiters are at
tached tD each car. The food costs
from 1. 000 to RoOO a month. It
costs from $ 1H. (100 to f'Ji'. 000 a year
to run one of these cars, exclusive of
the wear and tear on tho property
and incidentals. In somo place and
particularly in the .South, sleepers
aro also run at a loss. A sleeping
car leaving New York for Chicago is
supplied with li'O sheeta li'O pillow
slips and li'O towel? The washing
is done in different cities, and is given
out in great quantities at tho low rate
of $1 per 100 pieces. An equipment
of linen, which lasts a year, is pur
chased in amounts of $50,000 worth
at a time. One company, for 700
cars, uses every thirty days 2,400
dozen cakes of toilet soap. 1.200
dozen boxes of matches :$. dozen hair
brushes. ;"0 dozen whisks. (iJ doun
combs, and a vast number of spouges
and feather dusters. Porters receive
from $30 to $.10 a month.
The found Ster'.ing.
The origin of the word sterling, as
applied to English money, is a singu
lar bit of linjuistie history. Esterl
ing. in old English, meant a man from
the East, or Irom the continent of
Europe. During the reign of Henry
III. of England the coin current be-
j-, j., . . . .
came so ueuasou mm it passou lor a
tithe of its nominal value, and the
neceisity for improvement became
apparent. There were no refiners in
the realm who could separate the alloy
from the previous metal to the extent
of purifying tho latter and rendering
it fit for coinage purposes., so a num
ber of Esterlings were brought from
Germany to do the work. The coins
they sent from the royal mint were
so much superior to those in common
use that they were known as the
Esterling money, and by popular cor
ruption soon became sterling.
A Jev IlritUh Stamp.
A new stamp is to be issued in
great Britain to the value of 4 pence
'J cents to be available for all
postal, telegraphic and revenue pur
poses. It will be the first stamp is
sued of this value, and its issuance is
called for by the new features of tele
graph and parcel post business.
The First Mowing Machine.
In 1822 a patent was issued to Jer
emiah Bailey, of Pennsylvania, for a
mowing machine, and he constructed
two machines tho same year. It is
believed that these were the first ever
made.
KDITORIAIi PARAGRAPHS.
The distillery at Nebraska City has
been cobbled up by the great whiskey
trust.
Thr jwople's party i the first new
party in the history of the nation to
win any electoral votes in its first
national campaign.
What has become of the reformers
! who wanted the alliance to secure re
! form by controlling the old parties? It
i lrwiks as though thev have been com-
, 8Wallowed up by the old parties.
r J
Ir the fanners of tho United States
would only free themselves from the
shackles ot party and stand together
for their own interests, they could
have a genuine congress meeting in
Washington instead of the counterfeit
affair which met in Lincoln last week.
Several democratic editors are al
ready in the field as candidates for the
post-ofliees. 'Among them are J. D. Cal
houn of Lincoln, and E. J. Hall of
Grand rsland. We whh them all suc
cess, and these two in particular.
The democrats in the Georgia legis
lature have voted a resolution asking
congress to repeal the tax on state
bank issues. It appears that a Georgia
man was responsible for having that
plank put in the Chicago platform, and
now the party will find itself in trouble
if it doesn't carry that plank into effect.
Tm: republicans of Nebraska are just
now extending a good deal of gratitude
and honor to Chairman A. E. Cady of
their state committee. This is per
fectly proper. The republicans owe a
great deal to Cady. He has proved
himself a good organizer and a shrewd
campaign manager.
The republican politicians of Kan-ns
have sprung a scheme to divide that
state into two states, East aud Wc
Kansas. They think the west end
wouia 03 saieiy repuoucan. inis re
minds us of Geo. W. E. Dorsey's
scheme to divide Nebraska which did
not materialize.
The republicans have already begun
"calamity howling.' The following head
lines of an article in the Philadelphia
Press are a sample howl: "Cleveland's
victory affects industries; many manu
facturers closing down to await the
action of congress; orders falling off
rapidly; proposed tin plate mills will
not be built: maker3 of glass shades
working on short time."
Some persons when asked to sub
scribe for a reform paper, complain
that "tho times are hard." But why
are the times hard? Simply because
the people have been misled by the
subsidized press of the country. The
only cure for hard times lies in carry
ing out the reforms proposed by the
people's party; and the only hope of
success lies in tho education of the peo
ple through tho reform press. Hence
every man who desires to relieve the
hard times should give a liberal
port to tho reform press.
sup-
Coxgressman Kem left Nebraska
on Friday November 25 on his way to
Washington. He expects to visit
friends in Indiana for a week, aud to bo
in hi-seat ready for work when the
session open3 December .". Before leav
ing Lincoln, Mr. Kem expressed him
self as very hopeful that the indepen
dents in the coming legislature will
succeed in electing a United States
senator. He believes the general tri
umph of the people's party is only a
question of time.
General Weaver expresses the
opinion that the democratic party really
intends to repeal the tax on stato bank
issues, but a good many other leaders
of the people's party hold to the con
trary view. They say the promise
made at Chicago was simply made to
hold in line southern leaders with
whom stat-a banks is a hobby. Time
alone will decide which opinion is cor
rect. Of one thing we may rest as
sured, that the tax will not be repealed
unless the money power desires it.
Many members of all parties in Ne
braska express themselves in favor
of amending the Australian ballot law.
Tnc present ballot is inconveinent, it
gives opportunities for official trickery
in arranging and printing tickets, and
it is a source of many errors on the
part of voters. Most other states ad
opting the Australian system have
what is known as the ' blanket ballot."
The full tickets nominated by the vari
ous parties are printed side by side. At
the head of each ticket is a picture of
some kind so that even the voter who
can not read can easily distinguish the
ticket of his party. If a voter desires
to vote the straight ticket of his party,
he simply makes a cross opposite the
head of the ticket. If he desire9 to
vote a mixed ticket, he can do so by
making a cross opposite the name of
each candidate he wishes to vote for.
There seems to be quite a general senti
ment in favor of adopting this form in
Nebraska.
Subscribe for
PES DENT.
The Alliance-Inde-
stlafled with Her Lot.
Little Dick Don't you wish you was
a boy '.'
Little Dot No. I is glad I isn't
Little Dick Why?
Little Dot 'Cause mamma says I is
bad, an' 1 know if I was a boy I'd le
badder.
Jt Spoiled Hi m.
Blinks That fellow hharpleigh is
the most insufferably conceited man I
ever saw. What has he ever done tc
gain such a high opinion of himself?
Winks I believe he once found a
mistake in a newspaper.
An E'ft for ISuitlneaft.
Fool Woman (in railroad train on
cold day) I'ardou me, sir, but this
window sticks. Won't you undertake
to open it?
Gentleman With pleasure, madam.
I am an undertaker by profession.
Ural 111 Assured.
Mrs. lie for in (joyously) Now that
you have liecn elected to the tity
Council, I suppose we'll have deeent
drinking water at last.
Mr. lleform Y-e-s, I can afford to
have an artesian well now.
Low Hates for Nebraska State Teach
ers Association.
The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific
Railway will sell Tickets to Lincoln at
low rates on certificate plan. Ask your
licket Agent for particulars.
Jno. Sebastian. G. T. & P. A.
Chicago, U. S. A.
I'KlQlMJ'lTB) WITH THE GEOGRAPHY 0' THIS COUNTK i "
MUCH VALUABLE IHFOMIATICN FROM h STUDY CF THIS MAP Crs
leap, EoctlsMi Pacific Ej,
ltie Direct Koute to nd from CHICAGO, P.OCK
ISLAND, DAVENPORT, DE3 MOINES, COUNCIL
ELL'FFS, OMAHA, LINCOLN, WATERTOWN,
I0UX FALLS, MINNEAPOLIS, ST. PAUL, ST.
JOSEPH, ATCHISON, LEAVENWORTH, KANSA3
CITY, TOPEKA, DENVER, COLORADO SPRINGS,
and PUEBLO. Free Reclining Choir Cars to tni
from CHICAGO, CALDWELL, HUTCHINSON and
DODGE CITY, and Palace Sleeping Cars between
CHICAGO. WICHITA and HUTCHINSON.
C
ua vestibule express mm
rt Throiirh Conches. Sleepers. Free Reclin!rr Chn
Cars mid Dlnlnc Cars daily between CHICAGO, DKS
MOINES, COUNCIL ULUFFS, OMAHA and LIN.
rm.K nnd between CHICAGO and DENVER,
rnt nfiAim SPRINGS and PUEBLO viaSt. Jo6eriL
m lfinw Cilv and Toneka. Excursions daily, with
Choice of Routes to and from Salt Lake, Portland, Los
Annelesand San Francisco. The Direct Line to aud
from Pike's Peak, Manitou, Garden of the Gods, the
sanitariums, and Scenic Grandeurs or Colorado.
Via The Albert Lea Route
ci T.nmn Tr'n dnlln between Chlcasro ar.d
Minneapolis and St Paul, with THROUGH Eccllidiig
sas City. Through Chair Car and Sleeper beta
ivnrin Hnlrlt I.nlce and Sioux Falls via Rock Isl:
The Favorite Line to Watertown, Sioux Falls, Uip
Summer Resorts aud Hunting and Fishing Grouuits ol
I ho KnrthtVMt
For Tickets. Mar, Folders, or desired information
afpiytoany Coupon Ticket Office, or address
E. ST. JOHN, JOHN SEBASTIAN
GecT 2Iaccr. Gen'l Hit. t Fa5S. A sU
CHICAGO. ILL.
WANTED SALESMEN .hTTie'or
our well known Nursery Stock, Seed and.Seed Po
tatoes. Fine opemni; for a few pushing men at
t?ooil waes
Apply qui k, statins' a);e.
L.
L. MAT SCO.. Nurseryman, Horist and
St Paul, Minn,
THE OMAHA HAY PRESS
i Manufactured by the
MARTIN & MORRISSY MANUFG CO
OMAHA, NEB.
A Full Circle. All Steel. Rapid. Dur
able and Light Runner.
ALL PRESSES FULLY WARA.NTED
SEND FOR CIRCULAR.:
MANUFACTURING CO.,
St. Louis, Mo.
Shuck Shelter.
Only one made that successfully
shells corn with the shuck on as well
as off.
Send for illustrated circular.? Mention
this paper.
IftlDUW BALE-TIE CO.
O MANUFACTURERS OF
ADJUSTABLE WIRE BALE-TIES.
Headquarters for this Class of Goods
WKITH FOB PRICES.
Station A, Kansas City, Ma.
PATETN
OR NO FEE-
A 48 page book free. Address
W. T. FITZGERALD, Att'y-atLw.
Cor. 8th nd F 6U. Washington. D. C.
i . fm ' i v i' - j
KINGSLAND
DOUGLAS
MODERN SURGERY IN
DR. THAD H. WOODWARD,
SURGEON IN CHARGE.
OBTAIN CHICAGO PRICES FOR ALL YOUR
PRODUCE.
The way to do this is to ship your Butter. Poultry, Eggs, Veal, Hay. Grain,
Wool, Hides. Beans, Proom Corn, Creen and Dried Fruits, Vegetables, or
anything you have to us. The fact that you may bav bPen Belling these articles at home
for jears is no reason that yon should continue to do fo if you can find a D6tter irjaraot. We
make a specialty of receiving shipments direct from FARMERS AND PRODUCERS,
and probably have tho largest trade In this way of aay house in this mrkct. vrjii8t you
are looking around for the cheapest market in which to buy your goods, and thus ec(nooiia
ing in that way, it will certainly pay you to give some attention to the best and most profit
able way of disposing of your produce. We
ALLIANCES, CLUBS, aad all fTganizi-.tloBg
this market If requested, we will send you
ping directions and such information as will he of service to you, if you conterupiate ship
ping. When so requested proceeds for shipntei ts wili be iepi sited to the credit of the ship
per with any wholesale bouse in Chicago. Lit as hear iron you, 47 ft
Summers Morrison & Co.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 174
Reference: Metropolitan National
ALLEN ROOT, Stock Agent, N 'braska State
Farmers' Alliance. Ollice and Financial
SHIP YOUR
ALLEN ROOT
LIVE SfOCK COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
South Omaha, Neb., Room 34 Exchange BuirJing.
Before Yon Ship Send for the Market.
References: First National Bank of Omaha: Parker Natiomil Ilnnk, Omaha: Commercial
National Bank, Omaha ; Nebraska Savings and fcxebauge liank.Omuha; Central City Bank, Central
City, Nebraska. ,.o., r nct kmi !,m,h
I ws snippers cau uraw oig'it uian vu un
WESTFALi COM. GO.
State Alliance and well known in Nebraska. Our specialty Car Loads Of
Potatoes, Onions, Apples, Cabbage, Kay and Oats. We also
have a heavy grain trade in Nebraska and Wyoming. We have an established
trade for all the above mentioned artices, and by shipping direct to us you will
get all the value there is in the goods. Write for prices and shipping instruc
tions. Reference: Metropolitan National Bank, Kansas City, Mo.
WEST FALL COMMISSION CO.
433 Walnut St.. Kansas Cltv Mo.
FAIRBANKS ANO
Eclipse Wooden and Steel Wind
Mills. BoxI382. J. P. CARSON, Agent, Lincoln, Neb.
J. C. McKELL,
Successor to BADGER LUMBER CO
Wholesale 1 Retail Lumber
TELEPHONE 7O..
0 ST. BETWEEN 7TH AND 8TH LINCOLN, NEB,
use
FACE
BLEACH
FOR
Dark, Sallow
AMD
-COMPLEXIONS.
SUNBURNED-
This Bleach removp all digcolorat'org and
In) purities from 'he skin, such es Frpokles,
Moth VHtchpR, Sunburn, Saliowne&B, Flesh
worms, and Pimples wber- thty are diseases
of the skin, as tbejr olten are.
For Sale by all First-Class Druggists.
Price JI.50 pai Bottle.
ALL ITS BRANCHES
f2f South 14th St.,
L-ipcolrt, flcb.
invite coirespor dence from INDIVIDUALS,
who dsire to ship their produce direct to
free of charge our daily market report, ship
South Water Street Chicago.
Bark Chicago.
M'gr.
GEO. S. BROWN.
Salesman.
OWN STOGK.
AKSD COSPAY,
i-v o.. v. ...... .. v.. .
General Produce Merchants.
Legal representatives of Kansas
VICTOR SCALES,
:rrRi!isaS'5!arw7
GRANITE and MARBLE
MONUMENTS.
All Kinds of Cemetery Work.
KIMBALL & FRALICK
lC'iOOSt. s : : LIXCOUI.SEB.
JAPANESE
CURE
A new mA Complete TrBntmeni. oonclstina of Snn.
it Positive Cuie for External Ititei nal ti til 1 . ui '?
in ItehiBR. Chronic. R or I SoSwPi k?
Vn'
tteeaaniple. Qnarantre twued by J, H K, SJ?
(rut, sole ait, 11th aiVl 0 utraeti UncolnV N2'