Will Maupin's weekly. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1911-1912, December 15, 1911, Image 9

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    UNION STOCK YARDS AT SOUTH OMAHA
The story of the founding and
growth of the Union Stock Yards at
South Omaha reads like a tale from
the Arabian Nights, so wonderful it
is; so magnificent it is in its con
ception and in its fulfillment.
Scarcely more than a quarter of
a century old, this great live stock
center has grown to be the third
largest in the world, and around it
has been builded the world's third
largest packing industry. Doubtless
its founders dreamed great dreams
and saw great visions of its future,
but even in their most enthusiastic
moments they never eoneeived that
the institution they created would
grow to its present sie.
It was in the brain of "Uncle Bill"
Paxton that the idea was born. Smok
ing his old cob pipe "Unele Bill" saw
in the smoke wreaths a picture of a
great live stock market upon the
western banks of the Missouri river.
And "Uncle Bill's" pipe didn't go
out, eithor. lie knew that upon the
ranges of Nebraska fed hundreds of
thousands of cattle; that in her feed
lots were hundreds of thousands of
hogs. He saw these cattle and hogs
transported from five hundred to a
thousand miles to be sold upon the
Chicago market. "Why not estab-li-Ji
a live stock market right here!"
asked "Uncle Bill" of some of his
business associates.
"Well, why not!" they replied.
"But we've got to have packing
plants," said someone.
"They'll come when we establish
the stockyards." said "Uncle Bill,"
stoutly, "because they'll come where
they can get the kill."
Thus it was. that after talking it
over for a long time, that William
A. Paxton. John A. Creighton. Alex
Swan. Thomas Swobe, Peter E. Her.
J. A. MeShane and other enterprising
men got together and organized the
Union Stock Yards Co. They did
not know it then, but it was a case
parallel to Alladin and his wonder
ful lamp.
Of course Omaha was the logical
point for the establishment of the
stockyards. It had the railroad facil
ities, it had the freight rates, it was
the natural gateway between the pro
ducing section and the consuming
section. Having organized their com
pany these pioneer business men se
lected the site for the yards the
Prexel farm, five miles south of Om
aha. Part of it was a cornfield.but
most of it was a wilderness of brush
and weeds. When the first seraperful
of dirt was wheeled South Omaha was
bom. and South Omaha was very
much like Minerva. You will remem
ber that Minerva sprang fully
equipped from the brain of Jove.
Of course a lot of wiseacres stood
around with their hands in their
pockets and worried themselves to
death, almost, because Paxton and
hss associates were bankrupting them
selves backing a visionary scheme
There is always plenty of such fel
lows to stand around and "haekeap."
But the members of the company kept
riiht on. They had their hands in
their pockets a good share of the
time reaching for money. In good
time they repeated the operation of
thrusting their hands into their
pockets but it was to put money in
instead f to take money out
Finally the yards were built, and
in August of 1884 they were throwu
open for business. It was slow work
at first. A great stock market is not
builded in a day. ami for a consider
able time the Union Stock Yards re
mained merely a feeding station for
stock eu route from the west to the
east. But as the volume of stock
stopping at the yards increased, it
began drawing buyers and dealers
just as honey draws the bees. First
enie the speculators and traders,
some of them being shippers them
selves. Then came men who wanted
to buy feeders fanners and country
men looking for sheep and cattle Tor
feeding purposes. Then came th- buy
ers front the packing houses.
Then, finally, and best of all. the
packers themselves came.
One by one the packers began estab
lishing packing plants in South Om
aha and the dreams of Paxton and
MeShane and Her and Creighton and
others came true.
Today it is the third largest live
stock market in the world, and the
third largest packing center in the
v.orld. And South Omaha's live
srock market and packing industries
have made the name of Nebraska
famous around the world.
South Omaha is one of the -best -horse
and mule markets in the United
States, having handled as many as
3.667 animals in one day. There are
two large firms engaged in the horse
and mule business at South Omaha
exclusively, namely. I. C. Gallup and
the South Omaha Horse and Mule
Company. The horse market may be
paid to be divided into two depart
ments, range horses and native horses.
The range business starts in June of
each year and lasts until December.
The native trade continues throughout
the year, but is most active from
about the first of the year until June.
MUTTON CHOPS EN
In 1910 South Omaha received SSS
849 cars of live stock, a gain of nearly
17.000 cars in ten years and an aver
age of nearly 300 cars per day for the
market year. Out of this number
received. nlv 837. cars were not
actually sold on the South Omaha
market, some of which were feeders
stopped in transit to feed and rest
going to feed lots east, so that it will
be seen that more than 99 per cent
cf the stock shipped to the South Om
aha market in 1910 was sold there.
Aside from the gain in the receipts
over previous years, this is a remark
able demonstration of the growth and
stability of the market.' During the
last three years the market has broken
all its records in yearly receipts of
cattle, hogs and sheep. The appended
statement shows the receipts by years
of live stock at South Omaha sinee
the establishment of the yards:
A summary of the receipts of live
stock at the Union Stock Yards, South
Omaha from the year 1884 to the year
1910 inclusive, will he interesting, and
the totals will he staggering. Here
they are:
Years,
ISSt
tSS5
tSSS
l$i
1S91
IS 2
I $93
193
1596
1597
1598
1599
1900 . . . . ..
191
1903
1903
194
1905
1906
1907
IStV
1909
Wl
Tot1
A grand total of 92.312.432 head of
live stock handled in twenty-seven
years! Your mind isn't big enough
to grasp that total. No man's mind
is. But perhaps it can be put in a
way that will enable you to grasp it.
Suppose we trailed all that live stock
out in single file, and allowed a scant
ten feet for each animal. It would
make a procession of live stock 174,
834 miles long more than seven times
around the globe! And four-fifths of
EL BUCKINGHAM
General Manager Union Stock Yard Co
all this live stock was fed and fattened
, in Nebraska !
The largest day's receipts of cattle
by the Union Stock Yards was on
September 5, 1910 15,663 head. Of
ROUTE
sheep, October 10, 191063,714. Of
hogs, June 20. 1906 21,501.
The largest week's receipts of eat
tie was the week ending August 31.
1910 62,164. Of sheep, week ending
August 31, 1910 211,816. Of hogs,
week ending May 31, 1905 119,518.
The largest yearly receipts were as
follows: Cattle, 19101,223,533. Hogs,
19082,424.851. Sheep, 19102,984,
870. During the last three years many
new facilities have been added and a
large amount of improvement work
has been done. It is the purpose of
the present management to make the
South Omaha stock yards the most up-to-date
of any in the land and pro
vide service which may not be ex
celled elsewhere. With this end in
view, the management has in the last
three years expended more than half
a million dollars in extensive improve
ments and new construction.
In the cattle department, many new
pens have been built and the yardage
cspaeity greatly increased; concrete
water troughs have been placed in all
the new pens and in a large part of
Cattle.
SS.603
116.963
14S.513
239.377
S55.923
472.094
615.337
601.002
755.059
S52.456
S21.512
5S6.103
5S6.57S
S10.949
812.244
S37.563
S2S.204
S1S.003
1.010.S1S
1.071.177
944.192
1.026.SS2
1.079.373
1.15S.716
1.036.625
1.14.618
1.123533
20.022.92S
Hogs.
152.524
447,019
1.056.524
1.22.647
1.224,691
1.702.723
1.537.3S7
1.61S.SS4
1.406451
1.932.677
1.1S6.726
1.216.370
1.610.981
2.101.3S7
2216.4S2
200.92
2,414.05
2.247.425
2.23 1.067
2,299.627
2.293,956
2.393,551
2 53.652
2.424.S51
5.135.493
1,894.314
Sheep.
3.593
19.4S4
41,4
TS.422
172.13$
152.517
Mules.
4S9
2.07
2.099
3.344
5.271
T.550
5.069
S.75X
169.$65
1SS.5SS
14,113
252.273
52.273 12
!S4
243.945
204.S7
355.005
627.160
1.085.136
1.0S6.319
1.276.775
1,314,841
1.742.539
1.S63.763
1.754.365
1.970.502
2,165.116
2.03S.777
2,105.949
2.167.014
2.9S4.S70
JL294
7.077
9.347
6.572
10.392
34.255
59.645
S6.S91
42.079
52.S29
46.845
45.423
42.269
44.020
S9.99S
31,711
29.734
45.460.576 2S.225.1S9 603.741
the older pens; nearly the entire cat
tle division has been paved with con
crete, replacing wooden plank and
brick flooring; new scale houses
added; new branding and dehorning
chutes built; three concrete subways
constructed to facilitate the movement
of cattle about the yards ; double alleys
built to relieve congestion during
heavy runs; new elevated walks have
been erected for the convenience of
patrons of the market, and many
minor improvements made in the inter
est of better facilities for handling the
business of this department.
Without any regard to the economic
advantages accruing to the Nebraska
farmer and stockman from a market
as accessible to him as is South Om
aha, that market is a distinct asset to
the state. The South Omaha market
with its allied interests brings within
the state a great industry which is
fcound to make for its advancement
commercially and the larger it is per
mitted to grow the greater the bene
fits to be derived from it by the peo
ple of Nebraska. Therefore those hav
ing the best interests of the state at
heart can very becomingly support
nd assist in building np this great
industry in Nebraska.
Every shipment of live stock to the
South Omaha market by a Nebraska
IN THE FEEDER DIVISION
shipper helps to make a better, market,
helps to build up a great Nebraska
institution, helps to make more as
sured the prosperity of the state and
her people. It is a vast enterprise
that deserves the hearty support 'and
good will of every Nebraskan inter
ested in the upbuilding of the com
monwealth. The officers of the Union Stock
Yards Co. are: K. J. Dunham, presi
dent; J. D. Creighton, vice president!
J. C. Sharp, secretary-treasurer; E.
Buckingham, general manager. The
directors are R. J. Dunham, R. C.
Ilowe, F. II. Davis. Y. B. Caldwell, J.
D. Creighton, C. B. Robbins, Lee W.
Spratlin. Thos. B. McPherson. The
late Senator Charles F. Manderson
was a director at the time of his
death.
THINGS WE ARE PROUD OF
Nebraska has more things to be
proud of than any other state. She
ought to be making every one of them
known to all the world. Nebraska is
remiss in her duty to herself when she
fails to advertise her resources and pos
sibilities to the remotest corners of the
earth. Nebraska has some mighty big
things, thank you.
She has the largest creamery plant
in the world.
Her largest city, Omaha, is the great
est butter market in the world.
She has the third largest packing
center in the world.
She has the second largest smelter in
the world.
She is the third largest corn pro
ducer. She is the third largest dairying
state, and promises to be the largest
inside of ten years.
Her annual egg output is worth more
than the gold output of any state or
territory.
Her annual butter, egg and poultry
output is worth more than the gold and
silver output of any two states or ter
ritories. Her annual output of corn and wheat
is worth more than the nation's annual
output of crude petroleum.
Her annual output of grains and
grasses is worth more than the coal
output of Pennsylvania,
Her annual corn output is worth
more than the nation's annual output
of copper.
If one year's product of her farms
were loaded in standard freight ears
and the ears made into one train, the
train would reach from St. Petersburg,
Russia, to a point in the Pacific ocean
nearly a thousand miles due west of
San Francisco, crossing the Baltie sea,
the English ehanneL England, Ireland,
the A tl an tie ocean and the United
States.
She has nearly a million acres in al
falfa, and the acreage is increasing at
the rate of 10 per cent a year.
She has more than eight million dol
lars worth of interest bearing securities
in her permanent sehool fund, and
school property, including sehool lands,
worth $40,000,000.
She has 49,000,000 acres, " three
fourths of it fertile and less than two
fifths of it under cultivation.
She has a climate unsurpassed, a soil
more fertile than that of the valley of
the Nile,
She offers more opportunities to the
honest and industrious home-maiei
than any other state or territory and
she isn't doing a blessed thing to make
the f aet known.
SHOE MANUFACTURING.
There may be many reasons why Ne
braska is not at the forefront in the
matter of manufacturing shoes, but the
indications are that the ehief reason is
a failure of westerners to appreciate the
faet that Nebraska can and does
manufacture shoes equal to the pro
duet of any manufactory in the east.
Few people realize the enormity of the
penitentiary shoe output in this coun
try. There are no shoes made by con
vict labor in Nebraska, yet in 1910 Ne
braska shoe factories turned out up
wards of $1,000,000 worth of shoes
as good as the best and better than
most. All of these shoes were made
by well paid men and women who are
building homes and maintaining fami
lies in Nebraska, thus adding to the
prosperity of the state. It is a sad com
mentary on the loyalty and good judg
ment of Nebraskans-that- the largest
share of the output of Nebraska's shoe
factories was sold in other states.
There are four large shoes factories
in Omaha, employing perhaps 750
skilled workers. These factories turn
out every kind of shoe from the patent
leather dress shoe to the laced boot
used by cattlemen and other outdoor
workers. The greater portion of the
output is the medium grade shoes that
sell everywhere. Despite many draw
backs the industry is growing at a
gratifying rate. Will Maupin's "Week
ly is of the candid opinion that as soon
as Nebraskans realize the foolishness of
shipping green hides east by the mil
lion to be tanned into leather and made
into shoes, then buying the shoes baek,
thus leaving all the wages in the east,
Nebraska will see a wonderful growth
of shoe manufacturing industry. Then
we will employ hundreds of Nebras
kans in the industry of tanning the
millions of hides taken from Nebraska
cattle, and thousands in the manufac
ture of shoes from that same leather.
In the meantime let loyal Nebraskans
cultivate the habit of demanding Ne
braska made shoes. They will find them
equal to any made, and every time a
Nebraskan buys a pair of Nebraska
made shoes he is giving employment to
Nebraska labor and keeping Nebraska
money at home where it will do Nebras
ka and Nebraskans the most good.
THE GOOCH MILLING COMPANY.
Elsewhere in this number will be
found a brief review of the milling in
dustry in Nebraska, together with some
idea of its magnitude. One of the mill
ing concerns contributing largely to the
tremendous volume of Nebraska mill
ing output is the Gooeh Milling Co, of
Lincoln. This is one of the largest Soar
ing mills in the west, and was erected
less than three years ago- It is a
model mill in every respect. By virtue
of the excellence of its produet ihis
mill has become known throughout jthe
country. "Gooeh 's Best" is a synonym
for the best there is in fiour. This com
pany is adding largely to the xolum of
Nebraska's business, and its payroll is
a big factor in the industrial life of
Lincoln.