The Plattsmouth journal. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1901-current, May 19, 1921, Page PAGE TWO, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
PLATTSMOTJTH SEMI-WEEKLY JOURNAL
THURSDAY, MAY 10,. 1921
new sizejj)
uVpackaojey II
LPS IKY
& u is
UlfA
tO cigarettes for 10 cts
Handyand convenient; try
them. Dealers now carry
both sizes : 10 for 10 cts ;
20 for 20 cts.
lit
s uoastteo
LOCAL N E IV S MISSOURI PACIFIC
WINS DAMAGE SUIT
Fronr Tuesday's Dally.
Robert McCleery of Weeping Wa
ter, was in the city today for, a few
hours looking after some matters at
the eourt house.
Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Hull and Mrs.
Floy DeRoss returned this morning:
to their homes at Sioux City, making
the trip in the automobile of Mr.
Hull.
James Fitzgerald of Falfurris,
Texas, is here for a short visit at the
home of his brother, Edward Fitz
gerald and from here will go to Wis
consin and Illinois for a visit before
returning to his home in the south.
From Tuesday's Dally.
Frank Meade of Union was in the
city for a few hours today looking
after some business matters at the
court house.
U. F. Goodman was a passenger
to Omaha this morning, where he
was called to look after some busi
ness matters of importance.
County Clerk George R. Sayles and
County Assessor William Rummell.
were out in the county today look
ing after the work of the precinct
assessors.
Hon. H. K. Frantz of Eagle was in
the city for a few hours yesterday
afternoon looking after some matters
of business at the court house and
calling on his many friends in the
county seat.
William Starkjohn departed this
morning for Gothenburg, Nebraska,
where he was called to look after
some matters of business in connec
tion with his farming interests there
and will be gone for several days.
Oscar Larson, who is now in the
employe of the Union Pacific at Glee
ley. Colorado, came in last evening
and visited over night at the home
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. G.
Larson and family. Mr. Lars;i: is
engaeed in construction work with
the Union Pacific out of Cheyenne
and is in Omaha today in consult i
tinn with t iic engineering force of
the company.
ACCEPTS NEW POSITION
The Hotel Wagner has a new night
clerk looking after the interests of
the patrons of this popular hotel in
the person of Ed Button, who has
heretofore been in the employe of
the Russell cafe. Mr. Button is a
very pleasant and genial gentleman
and comes to the Wagner very highly
recommended as a gentleman well
qualified for the position, and one
who will see that the patrons are
given every courtesy possible.
Action of Fred C. Haffke of This City
Against Railroad Company is De
cided in Favor of Company
From Wednesday's Dally.
The damage suit of Fred C. Haffke
of this city against the Missouri Pa
cific railroad company, which was
tried this week at Lincoln before
District Judge W. M. Morning, was
decided yesterday morning by the
court when he sustained' a motion
of the defense to instruct the jury to
return a verdict in favor of the rail
road company.
In the cause of action the plaintiff
sought damages in the sum of $3,000
and in his petition stated that on
ADril 14. 1920. he was driving a
heavy loaded motor truck in Sarpy
conntv and crossing the tracks of
the defendant company near Fort
Crook when his vehicle was struck
by one of the defendant's trains and
demolished. The plaintiff sustained
severe injuries to his person as well.
It was contended by the railroad
company in the case that the accident
was due entirely to the negligence
of the plaintiff, who was familiar
with the road, could have seen the
train coming and could have stopped
his truck if he had been handling it
with proper care.
The plaintiff had contended that
the situation of the crossing was
such as to obscure the view of the
approaching train as well as the fact
that the locomotive did not give any
alarm of its approach.
CHURCH RITES DENIED,
FUNERAL IN THE STREET
Chicago. May 17. Anthony D'An
drea. political and labor leader and
the fourth victim of a campaign of
assassination, the outgrowth of a po
litical feud in the Nineteenth ward,
was buried yesterday, more than
8.000 persons on foot and in automo
biles following the body to the grave.
The Catholic church having for
bidden its last rites for D'Andrea.
the final services were conducted over
his flower covered bronze casket
while it rested in the street before
his home on the spot where he was
thot.
With thousands kneeling about
the casket in the street, the last
prayers were said by Father Horace
D'Andrea, a brother, who appeared In
full vestments.
D'Andrea had left the church after
his arrival from Italy, where he was
born, and was ex-communicated.
0. K. GARAGE
-Gasoline!- -Oil!- -Storage!-
24-HOUR SERVICE LOWEST RATES
STANDARD GASOLINE
Polarine and Monomobile
MOTOR OILS ON SALE HERE
Storage Rates
8 hours ; .25c
24 hours . : 50c
1 month $5.00
ONE YEAR
Outside city $15
City cars $25
Washing Rates
Open cars $1.50
Ford closed cars. . . 1.50
Other closed cars. . 2.00
First Class Job
Guaranteed
Wire wheels, extra. .25c
Contract your Storage by
the year and always have
a Safe and Warm place.
&srT You can leave your car here to be lubricated with
positive assurance work will be done in an efficient and
economical manner. $1 per hour, plus material used.
YOUNG GIRL GOES
TO GENEVA SCHOOL
Clara Lamphear is Ordered to State
School on Being Found Guilty of
Incorrigible in County Court
From Wednesday's Dally. j
Yesterday afternoon County Judge'
Beeson had before him for trial, Clara '
Lamphear, a sixteen-year-old girl on ;
the charge of being incorrigible, the j
complaint being filed by County At-'
torney A. G. Co'e. as the result of a
number of complaints from residents j
of the city as to the conduct of the
girl. j
The case is most unfortunate, both
owing to the youth of the young girl I
and the sorrow and grief that it has !
brought to her family, but was a step j
taken as the only possibility of im- j
proving her conduct.
This is only one case of many ,
that have resulted from the habit!
of the girls of the community being j
allowed to run at large until their
parents and relatives are unaoie io
control them and they gradually drift
into the least desirable company that
results in bringing not only sorrow
to their families, but a great grief
to themselves. The present day con
ditions are not the best for the young
girls to be allowed to go when they
please at all hours of the night and
remaining out until the early morn
ing hours and this one case which
is not as serious as a number of oth
ers have proven should be a striking
object lesson to the parents of the
community to check up the actions
of their children.
The law can punish, but the law
is not the power to instruct and
guide the young people in the time j
before they have strayed from the:
straight and narrow path and thisi
responsibility lies with the parents!
entirely.
Ml
Out
ft
jBesiiniess!
I
LADS START OUT
ON WILD CAREER!
Two Boys Escaping From the Father
Flannigan Home in Omaha Are
Captured by Sheriff Quinton
From Wednesdays Dally.
Late yesterday afternoon Sheril
I). Quinton was called out to
1" C.
the
Carl Cole farm by the report that
some one had stolen a saddle be
longing to Will Je:in and which had
been at the Colo farm. The sheriff
on arriving there made a survey of
the situation and discovered The sad
dle concealed beneath a small bridge
near the Cole place where it had
been placed i by the two youthful
"bandits" who had taken it.
The sheriff took the two youthful
wrong-doers in charge and they gave
the names of Mike Kilbrala. aged
twelve years and Tom Lovalle. aged
thirteen years, and stated that they
had been residing at the Father Flan
nigan home in Omaha.
The two boys had run away from
the home on Monday and had se
cured a lift from the driver of an
automobile as far as Plattsmouth and
had then decided to work the coun
try districts and finally found their
way out to the neighborhood where
they were picked up. The lads wore
brought on into this city and placed
in the county bastile for safe keeping
until the Omaha authorities could be
notified of their presence and make
arrangements for their return tt the
metropolis.
The Time is Getting Short!
This Sale Will Soon Be Over!
Now is the Time to Take Advantage of the Many Bargains We Are
Offering Throughout Our Store.
r:-i
A FEW SPECIALS
For Men and Boys
Men's work shirts, blue and grey;
good ones. I'rice, TT.e each.
One lot men's heavy 220 blue den
im overalls; both high and suspen
der backs; while they last, closing
out price. $1.49 pair.
Men's dress shirts; very neat pat
terns. Formerly sold to $C75. Now
7!e each.
Men's dress and work pants. I'rice
cut s-iuare in two.
About 100 men's and young men's
extra vests being closed out at :15c
each.
Boys' shoes worth to $fi.aO a pair,
on sale at $1.9."i.
l;oys' khaki suits; ideal for school
wear. Closing out price, $1.7.r.
? ? $$$$$
GROCERY BARGAINS
Closing Out Prices
Pure
Larg
cane sugar. 12 lbs $1.00
.hre. Star, Climax, lb TDc
cider vinegar, gal 'AOc
can tomatoes, best grade12c
Blueing. :'. bottles for
Mapl" and cane syrup,
Crisco, special per 11).
Kellog's corn Hakes
Lamp chimneys, all
CROCKS. CUPKXS
they last, per
2oc
can "9c
l!c
largo size17c
uzes. 2 for2."c
gallon,
While
14c
DRY GOODS
Unbleached muslin, good quality;
special, per yd.. 10c.
Apron ginghams, very best grade,
closing out price 132C per yd.
Percales, best quality, light and
dark patterns, sold as high as 50c;
closing out price lSc per yd.
Heatherbloom in assorted patterns
ami colors, specially priced, per yd.,
25 cents.
9-4 Aurora sheeting. Closing it
out at 4Sc per yd.
Feather ticking, fancy, $1 value.
Closing out price. 4Xc per yd.
Laces, embroideries and insertions
in all the latest patterns at less than
one-half of their actual value.
$$$$ $ $$$ $ $$
EXTRA SPECIAL!
Floor Covering
We have several rolls of high
grade linoleum, both in print and
inlaid patterns, which must be closed
out at a sacrifice. Specially priced
as low as
89c per Square Yd.
The
Caps
Biggest Bargains m
Ever Offered You.
We have several hundred caps in
beautiful patterns, silk lined. for
spring and summer wear. Absolute
ly the latest styles, made to sell from
$2.00 to $3.75. While they last.
69c
5 $ $ $ $
ML
-$$$$$$$$$$
BRING US YOUR EGGS! WE $
WILL PAY THE HIGHEST
MARKET PRICE FOR THEM t
FANC
Auto Contest!
Don't forget that we are giving
away absolutely free a beautiful
electrically equipped automobile.
Every penny that you spend in
this store counts for one vote. Help
some boy win.
Present Standing of the
Contestants
Finance Galloway 12.77S
Lawrence Itoardman Kio.'ull
Roller t Hirz !) 7.2:11
Robert Brittain !t2..'.r,2
Chas. Lamphear to.s:M
Eugene Baughman s:,7i!U
Lawrence Cofielt C 7. 1 7 S
tiim i mm iiiiii iiiiimn
r;
"Where Your Dollar Docs Double Duty'
PlattsinoutK,
Nebraska
J3lam
CLASSIFY RAIL
ROAD LABOR
'MISS ALICE" MAKES
HER MAIDEN SPEECH
Washington. D. C. May 17 Blush
ing like a bashful school girl, .mih
Alice M. Robertson, of Oklahoma, yes
terday made her first speech in the
he use.
She engaged in debate after Rep
resentative Mondell, the republican
leader, had declared the federal gov
ernment had "a little park down in
Oklahoma, which it had been trv-
ing to get rid of for several yours. It
had been offered, he said, to Okla
homa, but Oklahomans did not seem
to want it. realizing, he added, that
so long as they may utilize the
property and Uncle Sam pay the
upkeep it is a very satisfactory ar
rangement."
Miss Robertson asked the name, of
the tract, and when told it was
Piatt National park, inquired of Mr.
Mondell if he knew how ft hn 1 been
named. He admitted h didn't, so
she told him that it was named for
the late Senator Piatt of Connecticut,
one of the best friends. If not the
very best, the Indians of Oklahoma
ever had.
The white-haired woman repre
sentative delivered a brief spee.tb in
praise of Senator Piatt and wtun fhe
walked back to her seat was gener
ously applauded by the lnwse.
MEMORY BOOKS OF SCHOOL DAYS
One of the most valued gifts that
can come to the graduate is a memory
book in which the record of the school
days, the sweet and pleasant associ
ations of class mates may be pre
served through the years that are to
come. The Journal has provided a
large line of these books in exquisite
bindings and with complete records
for class histories, pictures of the
classes, schoolmates, class roll and
the signatures of the associates in
school life.
This little book of memory is one
that will be cherished' in the years
that come by the boys and girls wlin
are to leave school in so short a time.
Call and look over our line of these
beautiful books, we have :iie Girl
Graduate" and the "School Follow"
ditions both of which are very pop
ular.
Beard to Use It as a Basis for Col
lection cf Data for Settlement of
Any Future Dispute.
! vides against grouping together posi-
tiens of widely different duties and
! responsibilities as well as rates of
' compensation.
: "Such distinctions as are made be
I tween different types of positions are
I founded upon functional differences
in duties and responsibilities to the
j end that a uniform language may be
applied to similar kinds
that the railroads mav
Chicago. .May 17. The railroad la
bor board toniirht announced a new
and comprehensive classileation of
r::lroad labor to be used as the basis
for the collection of data for the set
tlement of any future dispute. The
new classileation. the board an
nounced, has been filed with the in
terstate commerce commission and be
came effective April IS.
Under the classification, the posi
tions on steiim railroads are grouped
In seventeen major service., the ser
vices are sub-divided into lift groups
and within the groups are distinctive
class titles and separate grades.
"The occupational classification,"
the board said, "is not considered by
the board as setting up jurisdiction
lilies for occupations for as limiting
the kind of work which employes may
perforin or the duties which they may
r:s-unie. In preparing the classifica
tion, the board has not aimed to
standardize for any railroad occupa
tional duties assigned to, or the kind
,t work performed by its employes
and nothing in the classification could
be construed in this light. Its pur
pose is to so group positions that the
w:igp and other conditions reported
bv the railroads of the interstate com
merce commission and the railroad
labor board mav be used for admin
istrative and public purposes. It pro
of work and
I Hons and classifications of positions
uniform in" character, consistent in
outline and specific in terminology."
Woman loves a clear, rosy com
plexion. Burdock Blood Bitters is
splendid for purifying the blood,
clearing the skin, restoring sound di
gestion. All druggists sell it. Price,
MRS.
BERGD0LL FINED
FOR AIDING IN
ESCAPE
For croup or sore throat, use Di
Thomas lvlcotie Oil. Two sizes.
:50c and i0c. At all drug stores.
Auto Chain Lost
The day of harsh phyrics is roup.
People want mild, easy, laxatives.
Doan's Hegulets have satisfied thous
ands. SOc at all drug stores.
One "2x4 auto chain lost between
Xehawka and Union on "O" street
road. Notify Rav Klaurens at Xe-
hawka for reward.
Office supplies of all kinds
died at the Journal office.
han-
Acetylene Welding!
I am prepared to do all
kinds of Acetylene Welding.
Charges reasonable and work
the best.
JGHN SHELDOH,
Located at John Iverson's
Elaksmith Shop.
Plattsmouth, Nebraska
Philadelphia. May 17. Mrs. Kmma
C. Bergdoll was today sentenced In
the federal district court to one year
and one day in the Atlanta peniten
tiary for conspiracy to aid her sons,
Grover C. Bergdoll and Erwin It.
Bergdoll. to desert the United States
army, and was fined a total of $7,000.
Judge Dickinson in imposing sen
tence announced the prison sentence
would be remitted if the fine is paid
within the present term of court
ending the second Monday in June.
The same conditional sentence
was imposed on Charles A. Braun,
Mrs. Bergdoll's eldest, son. who
changed his name because of the
notoriety caused by Grover's esca
pades, and on James E. Romig,
friend of the family.
RICHARD W. CHILD
AMBASSADOR TO ITALY
Washington, I). C, May 17. Rich
ard Washburn Child, the author and
former editor of Collier's Weekly, has
been selected by President Harding
for ambassador to Italy.
Mr. Child, formerly of Xew York,
now lives in Washington. He has
been connected recently i;h re
publican national committee and
(luring l;i.-t summer's campaign .p iu
several months in Prcsid. nt Hard
ing's headquarters at Marion.
Eczema spreads
almoi-t drives vou
relief, 1 loan's Ointment
onimmded. i"c at all
rapidly; itching
wild. l'or quick
is well rt'e
:oref .
if S'
QUINN CASE REVERSED
The state spureme court has re
versed the decision of the district
court of Cass county in the case of
William J. Quinn, et al .vs. Charles
Quinn, which was tried here last sum
mer. This case grows out of the mak
ing of a deed by Mrs. Quinn to her
son. Charles Quinn, who had been
making his home with her, to the
farm on which the family resided
and to which the remaining heirs of
the estate objected. The plaintiffs
alleged undue influence on the part
of the defendant on the mother and
in the hearing in this county secured
a verdict in their favoi setting aside
the deed. The supreme court in re
viewing the case, holds that the will
is valid and stands in law and the
farm in question is the property of
Charles Quinn.
W. A. ROBERTSON
v Cnates Block -Second Floor
EAST OF RILEY HOTEL
VI
T1
it
Canton Crepe Frocks Prove There is no
Smarter Combination than
Black and Gray
T INTERESTING because of their unusual chic and no
less because they are ideally correct for that hour when
one glibly orders, "a pot of orange pekoe and almond
torte, please" are Frocks of rich black Canton crepe.
Fabric of the same alluring pebbly weave in a delicate
dove gray tone relieves them at the neckline, waist and
forms the foundations of the smartly slashed skirts. And
further inspection of these modes reveals touches of gray
j embroidery employed in a decidedly "Frency" fashion.
i uu win ciijuy uyiug uicaw uii anu uc surprised mac we
are only asking
$15, $18, $22.50 and $25
Ladies Toggery
FRED P. BUSCH, M anager
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