The Plattsmouth journal. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1901-current, October 21, 1918, Image 1

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VOL. XXXVI.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1913.
No. 3G.
STATE GHRiSTiAN EH-I
DEAVOH CONVENTION:
WILL BE HELD AT YORK, DUR
ING EARLY I'ART OF NOVEM
BER. 5C0 DELEGATES
EXPECTED.
WILL HAVE STRONG PROGRAM
All Societies Are Expected To Send
Delegates Without
Slint.
From Thursday's Daily.
Arc you r.c.-.v making plar.s to he
our of the five hui'Jred to attend
the S'ate Christian Endeavor l on
vention. held at Yvrk. November
7-10? Plans are working out splend
idly for this convention and York
i-; sparing no pains .netting ready fr
t h1 bi? crowd.
A strong program has been plan
ned. T'.iree speakers of National
r. putatk'ii aheaiiy lir.-'d up are:
Paul Urown c f Los Angeles. Inter
national Interrr-v-diate Superintend
ent; Dr. Vv. C. Smolenske of Denver,
former president of the Colorado
Stat Union and Dr. Arthur IT.
Ryan of Chicago, connected with the
American Board.
Mi.-s CI race Hooper of Crete. Na
tiomil Junior Superintendent, and
our own fWM secretary, will be with
as di'.rinf: the entire convention.
Mr. J. "a. Park.-- of York, the well
known composer will have charge
of the special music.
There is no limitation on the
number of delegates sent from each
society. Near-by towns are expect
ed to be rtpre-e lie 1 by tea or more
delegates end it is heped that the
societies two or three hundred miles
away will try to smd a sufficient
numb.r. that .he:i they tc home
they may put into action many of
the plan- brought out during this
fiuivcnl ion.
The J;n.inr and Intermediate? are
to have a part in this great conven
tion. Each department will have a
convent ir.n of its own. Every Jun
ior and Intermediate society in th?
Ptfto should i.e represented.
Entertainment at homes near the
convention headquarters wiil be as
signed according to the order of
j.re-Vegist rat ion.
F.nder present conditions it if a
difficult task to keep our local so
cieties up to the standard. No or
ganization has suffered so greatly
from the loss of members ar.d work
ers called to war. as has the Chris
tian Endeavor. New workers must
step in to fill the ranks. They need
the inspiration and enthusiasm that
will lie gained by attending this
convention.
PUT TIE WORLD
BETWEEN THEM
SUCH WILL BE THE CONDITION
OF MISS ANNA TIGH2 AND
LIEUT. LEO H. TIGEE.
From Thursday's Daily.
From the Omaha Bee, we clip the
following account of the meeting in
Omaha for a short time this wc?k,
of Miss Anna F. Tighe who is a Red
Cress Nurse, and Lt. Leo H. Tighe,
who is .still located at Camp Funs
ton: Brother and Sister Meet
On Way to Battle Fronts
One bound for the west, the other
awaiting a call to France. a Ne
braska brother and sister met for
a 20-minute visit in Omaha one day
last week. Miss Anna F. Tighe,
lied Cross nurse, in company with
100 other nurses, passed through
Omaha on a special train from New
York to San Francisco, where they
will embark for Siberia to be with
the expeditionary forces at Vladivo
stok. Her brother, Lt. Leo H. Tighe,
who is stationed at Camp Funston,
impatiently awaitirg overseas ord
ers, obtained special leave to Lid
farewell to his sister. Their par
ents. Mr. and Mrs. John Tighe of
"Manley. Neb., and several relatives
and friends, were also present, MUs
Tighe is a graduate of Mercy hos
pital, Chicago, and Las served six
months with the Red Cross in
France with the Dr, John II. Murphy
unit. Both the young people were
j born in Nebraska, the sister at
-
Mauley anil the brother in Grand
Island.
VISITING WITH FRIENDS HERE
From Tloir?ny's Daily.
Ray, Thomas and wife, the latter
a daughter of Fred Patterson, drove
down from their home at Kimball,
South Dakota, where they are en
gaged in farming, making the trip
in their Studebaker, which they
think tiie only car. Mr. Thomas,
while living considerably north of
this place, is having a good crop of
corn and will harvest about three
thousand bushels, he having had al
so that amount of small grain, and
has considered this a very profitable
year.
ROY RiNKER DIES
Fill PNEUMONIA
FORMERLY LIVED IN PLATTS
MOUTH, A PLASTER AND MA
SON. WAS SOLDIER AT
CAMP DODGE.
From Tliiirfdav's Dailv.
LeRcy C. Kinker for a long time
a resident of this city, a brother of
Mrs. Wm. K. Egenberger, died at
Camp Dodge, a few days since of
pneumonia, superinduced by Span
ish Influenza, the remains being
taken to his home at Lexington, on
Tuesday last, being met at Omaha
by Carl Egenberger. who went to
Lexington to attend the fun?ral.
Mrs. W. G. Egenberger, his sister,
was not able to go as she has just
recovered from a case of severe ill
ness herself.
Mr. Ilinker will be remembered us
being an expert plasterer and brick
mason, having worked on the post
office ..building during its construc
tion, lie had been at Camp Dodge
for about three months.
ump Aim
mu. m
LAID TO REST
YESTERDAY AFTERNOON WAS
HELD THE. FUNERAL OF
THIS PIONEER LADY.
From Thursday! Daily.
A large crowd of the friends of
Mrs. Anna Goos. who has for many
years lived in this city and adja
cent hereto, and who was known
and loved by all, wlio has had the
privilege of knowing her gathered
at her late home just south of this
city, to listen to the savin's of the
living utterances, which told of her
noble life, and of the goodly deeds
which she has done. The funeral
was conducted by the Rev. J. II.
Sieger, of the church of which she
was a member. The interment was
made at Oak Hill cemetery west of
the city.
QNALD DESPA1H
VISITS PARENTS
HAS NOT BEEN IN PLATTSMOUTH
FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS,
RENEWING OLD AC
QUAINTANCES. From Thursday's Dally.
Last evening Donald Despain, ar
rived in this city, coming to visit
with his parents, after having tried
for three years to find an easy spot
to get away in he finally concluded
to just pick up and come, and so
he did. Dcnald is looking fine. He ;
is making his home in Chicago,
where he is engaged in the oil busi
ness, being interested with a com
pany who are putting down some
wells in the south. He will remain
j for a few days, and hasten back to
'the work which awaits him. .
Mrs. William Barret and little
, daughter Jean, who have been
'visiting i'this city for the past!
j week with. Mrs. W. S. Leete, depart
ed this afternoon for their home.
a nnnt?
1H UUUO
0
OF EFFICIENCY
3Y THE UNTIEING ErTORTS OF
MK3. FRANK DUNBAR AND
MRS. C. A. ROSENCRANS.
REO CROSS COUNTY CHAPTER
Has Been Brought to the Present
Excellent Working
Condition.
From Friday's Pally.
Pursuant to the notice published
in these columns for the past few-
days, Plattsmouth Red Cross Chap
ter held a special election of offi
cers at their room Wednesday even
ing at 8:00 o'clock. The chairman
and vice chairman elected at a
previous meeting, were unable to
serve. A short business session was
held with the former chairman, Mrs.
F. II. Dunbar in charge. Mrs. Win.
Baird was unanimously elected
chairman and Mrs. J. E. Wiles, vice
chairman. Mrs. Baird and Mrs.
Wiles have been very faithful and
efficient in their work in the Red
Cross and will make very capable
leaders, and be of much assistance
and help to the workers of the
Plattsmouth Red Cross Chapter. We
bespeak a continuance of the splen
did work that has been done in the
past few months by the Plattsmouth
Red Cross Chapter under the guid
ance of Mrs. Wm. Daird as chairman
and Mrs. J. E. Wiles as vice chair
man. In speaking of the outgoing chair
man, Mrs. F. H. Dunbar and vice
chairman, Mrs. C. A. Rosencrans. it
is due to them that our Red Cross
Chapter, and not our Chapter alone,
but the Cass County Red Cross Chap
ter work has been brought to such
a high standard and efficiency a?,
well as the work arranged in a most
excellent sjstem. Words cannot ex
press their ever faithfulness and un
tiring efforts in ihis good work. To
them, what did it matter if house
hold duties and even the members
of their families were neglected a
day and sometimes a week, if there
was work at the Red Cross rooms
that would help the hoys "Over
There." Sometimes it was in the
Surgical Dressings department, or
the warehouse, sometimes the sys
tem of work needed to be rearrang
ed. Then household duties must be
taken tip, ther would be an S. O. S.
call on knitting, household duties
were laid aside for. the knitting.
Then too. these faithful workers did
not do their share of work between
2 and 5 one or two afternoons of
the week as we workers do, but it
was all the time, morning, after
noon and ni;ht and many nights it
was near midnight hour when they
wearily wended their way home
ward. It is due to them that our
work room and warehouse was made
so comfortable and convenient. We
appreciate what" they have done
and we predict success to the Red
Cross work wherever they may be
placed. They have not only been
doing their bit. but their utmost.
At the former business meeting
Miss Georgia White was elected Sec
retary and Treasurer. The chair
man of the various departments will
be appointed by the new chairman
and vice chairman in the near fu
ture. At the business meeting of the
Cass County Red Cross Chapter held
in the District Court room early in
October, the following officers were
elected:
County Chairman Mr. E. J.
Richey.
County Purchasing Agent Mrs.
T. E. Parmele.
County Secretary and Treasurer
Miss Bernese Newell.
EO BRANTNER
OAS PNEUMONIA
WAS DANGEROUSLY SICK, AND
STILL REMAINS IN VERY BAD
CONDITION.
From Thursday's null v
Edward Brantner, of Pender, who
has been so sick, was reported as
A HIGH STANDAR
being a little improved last evening.
Saturday evening was I: is most se
vere experience, and it was thought
that he would not l.e a tie to oer
come the disease, but was reported
slightly improved since. lie was
first taken with the Spanish Influ
enza, and. which resulted in Bron
chial pneuraoi.ia. I!:s manv friends
here will be pleared to know that
he is showing tome better condi
tions and hope that he iiiy he soon
over the dangerous points of the
disease. He had improved so as to
be up and had revived a back set
which was tne r.vu--e ct Ins most
serious condition.
The disease there is reported as
being very bad. as t v.;nt v-four
hours in the litt'e city, six died of
the maladv.
EXPECTS TO DE
PART VERY SOON
C. C. WESC0TT HAS SENT IN HIS
LAST PAPERS REGARDING
HIS Y. M. C. A. WORK.
From Fretny'F I"sit
The long tor'urous proceedure,
though which one has to go, in ord
er to obtain the necessary papers
and history to convince the govern
ment that one is fitted and the prop
er person, to go to Europe for Y. M.
, A. work, has at last been com
pleted by C. '. Wescott and the
last of the papers have gone to
Washington, and it is expected that
he will depart in a short time for
France. In a conversation with him
his morning, he said to the reporter.
that lie expected to eat Thanksgiv
ing dinner with the bys in Paris,
and Christmas dinner with them in
Berlin. Mr. Wescott is well equip
ped for the position which he is
entering and will make a good work
er, being patriotic to the backbone,
and having the welfare of the boys
at heart, and having the education
necessary to place him in position
to do the niost effective work, be
sides being interested in the work,
heart and soul, in a wav which will
bring him into the closest contact
with the boys, whoever they may
be. or what their circumstances. We
can see that Mr. Wescott will be
able to do more in this line of work,
than in any otI:?r, for it is not all
bullets, there must be something
else, and that is the part he is to go
to furnish.
TO CLASS ONE
MEN, LISTEN!
OF INTEREST TO ALL CIASS ONE
MEN OF THIS COUNTY. LET
US TELL YCU.
From Saturday's Daily.
All single men are placed by the
local board in class one. there is no
other way of doing the matter, they
all go there, by reasoiv of being
single. Also, those who have only
a wife as a dependent, they go there
also. This is t it o natural thins, no
other place to put them. Now conies
another matter. When you have re
ceived your card, notifying you of
the placing you there by the local
board which they have to do. you
are not to think that you are re
quired to make a trip to the count y
seat immediately to see about it.
The district board will in a short
time pass upon your question blanks
and will report on the matter as
per your occupation, and if that
shows you should be placed else
where, you will be classified hy them
in a different way. Remember the
local board classified you as per de
pendency, and not as your occupa
tion, and again the district board
will classify you as per your occu
pation, which may place you in a
more deferred class but cannot ad
vance your position. You may have
to wait for a short time to ascertain
where you really are by reason of
the enormous work now placed upon
the shoulders of the district board.
RED CROSS S0.CIAL WORKERS.
The Social Workers Red Cross
branch will serve lunch at the home
of Mrs. W. A. Taylor on Tuesday,
October 29th, for the benefit of the
Red Cross
tend.
All ere invited to at- j
LISTENED TO THE
STORYOF FRANCE
LARGE DEMONSTRATION LAST
EVENING AT PATRIOTIC MEET
ING ON COURT HOUSE LAWN
INTERESTED IN LIBERTY LOAN
Con&ressmsn Reavis Tells Of How
the Beys Firrht. And How
They Are Winning.
From Friday's Daily.
Between two and three thousand
people last night stood-and listened
to the story of France and our boys
over there, as told by Congressman
C. F. Reavis last evening at the
patriotic meeting, which was to
demonstrate the need of supporting
the Fourth Liberty Loan to the
fullest extent. Judge J. T. Begley
was selected as the presiding officer
of the evening, while Rev. M. A.
Shine delivered the four minute ad
dress, which in itself was a wonder
ful exposition of the conditions, and
the necessity of subscribing to the
limit the loan, which the govern
ment is asking. He spoke a literal
truth when lie said "No one lias a
right to Liberty, who will not sup
nort the measures necessary to main
tain that lioerty." The band was
as usual c ie of the enthusiastic pa
triotic features cf th 3 occasion, and
furnished some very inspiring music.
The speaker of the evening Mr.
Reavis began with a narrative of the
di'Iicuitk-s of getting away from here
vhen he was not an American boy
1:1 u :i norm. borne ci tne voyage.
and the comparative facilities, of th?
American and French in the matter
of unloading of the trainports, plac
ing them in two epochs and in the
ivilization of the world one thou
anl miles apart,
lie told of his experience-., and of
how the boys went over the top, be
ing in the firing line at the time.
and cf tV;e need of the Red Cross and
Y. M. C. A. working forces. He
spoke of the hospital, of the death
losse. and of the wounded and urg
ed the subscription to the liherty
Jo.in to the absolute limit cf one's
bility.
The people were highly pleased by
the description of the conditions
over there, some expected to have
heard more, hut the address was
along lines as porscribed by the war
censor board, and Mr. Reavis said
that he knows and has seen more in
France, but was not allowed to tell
all.
IS. SARAH SMITH
BUBiED TO-DAY
AGED LADY BURIED FROM 0T-
TERBEIN CHURCH THIS
AFTERNOON.
From Friday's Tiaily.
This afternoon the remains of
Grandma Smith, Mrs. Sarah Smith
was held from the Otterbein church
some eleven miles south of this city.
Mrs. Smith died a few days since
after a sickness extending over a
number of weeks. She was the
mother of J. L. Smith, of Nehawka.
of Mrs. Kniss of near Murray, W.
T. Smith of this city, a sister of R.
D. McNurlin of Weeping Water, and
has a large number of relatives in
this county, and a host of friends,
who have known her for many years,
and have only konw her to love and
respect her for the faultless life
which she has lived, and which she
had been like a benediction and an
inspiration to all who have been
privileged of her acquaintance. While
with her passing a friend to all -who
need a friend, has been lost, the
memory of her kind acts, will re
main, like the fragrance of a beau
tiful and sweet scented rose, to
cheer those who have known her on
the uneven path of life.
HOGS STRAYED.
1 red sow and three pigs and one
that weighs about 75 pounds. Stray
ed from my home. IT. L- Barnard,
d&w.
NEW CASES FILED IN
DISTRICT COURT
From Friiay". 7aily.
Jacob E. Jones this morning
through his attorney C. A. Rawls
filed a petition in the district court.
asking for a separation and decree of
divorce from his wife Mollie B
Jones, alleging extreme cruelty and
other causes for desiring such ac
tion.
There was also a case filed, look
ing towards the quieting of title of
lots 5, C, 7 and S in block 37 in
Young and Hayes addition to the
city of Plattsmouth by Joseph
Warga, and naming E. V. Heimberg-
er and others as the defendants.
FOLKS HEAR FROM
CHARLES LAHODA
LETTER FROM MISSING AMERI
CAN BOY TELLS OF HIS BE
ING IN HOSPITAL.
From Friday's Iaily.
A letter from Charles Lahoda,
written by himself coming from the
hospital in France, where he is re
covering from a wound received in
action in France, is a relief to the
relatives here and especially the
mother, who was fearful that he
had been taken a prisoner by the
Huns. He -said that he was recov
ering from the wounds which he
had received, but did not say as to
how severe they had been. His
many friends will be glad to have
heard from him, and that he is re
covering, and is not a prisoner with
the enemy, with the chances of muti
lation. WILES-CAN ADAY.
From Saturday's Daily
Miss Floy Mildred Canaday and
Mr. Ray C. Wiles were married Wed
nesday evening at S:30 at the beau
tiful farm home of the bride's sister
Mrs. George Domingo, four miles
northeast of town in the presence of
seventy or eighty relatives and close
friends. Rev. W. H. Riley of the
Congregational church officiated us
ing the simple ring .service. The
bride is the oldest daughter of Mr.
H. P. Canaday and has grown to
womanhood in the community and
has enjoyed a high reputation in the
county as a school teacher. The
groom is one of the well-to-do and
up-to-date farmers north of town.
Weeping Water Republican.
A Beautiful Woman.
Do you know- that a beautiful
woman always has a good digestion?
If your digestion is faulty, eat light
ly of meats, and take an occasional
dose of Chamberlain's Tablets to
strengthen your digestion. Price 25c.
TWO BIG
AGE MID
Strangers frequently ask us "How long
have you been established?" This indi
cates that age is a valuable asset to a
bank. The experience and the acquain
tance we have acquired during years of
service is of incalculable value.
It is reasonable to believe that a bank of
many years standing is operating on a
basis that is sound and safe. It is an in
dication that its friends are getting a satis
factory banking service. This bank was
established in 1871. Let us explain the
facilities of modern banking.
wm
pir--ra
mm
mm
First National Bank
Plattsmouth. Nebraska
CASS COONTY
GOES OVER TOP
MAKE IT AS MUCH OVER THE
TOP AS POSSIBLE, THE GOV
ERNMENT NEEDS IT ALL.
From Saturday." lnily.
It became apparent this morning
that the county would more titan
subscribe their allotment, many
people have subscribed more than
their quota, some have &one as high
as live and even more times their
amount., Last evening when the
final checking up of the county came
for the day, it was learned that ap
proximately there wa still about
$17,000.00 yet to raise, to go over
the top. H. N. Dovey communicat
ed with the various banks of the
county, of which there are twenty-
four, telling that all that they
would be required to raise one thou
sand dollars each, during th3 day. It
is evident that they will sell much
more than that amount, but it will
all be required, and the government
will need much more. This is the
time, when the limit should be
gone, that there might be no douLt.
of the attitude of this countrv as to
their views on the question of push
ing the war to the ultimate.
If you have purchased your limit.
as to your cash ability take a few
more on the payment plan, if the
war fails, you will have no need for
the money.
WIFE VISIT HERE
MAKE LONG JOURNEY FROM
SPOKANE. WASHINGTON. TO
ALBERTA CANADA. THEN
HERE.
From Saturday's Daily.
Thursday Ransom Cole and wife.
after making a journey of some four
thousand five hundred miles, start
ing from Spokane, Washington,
a here they have made their home
for a number of vears, thev went to
r..eit abridge, Albert, Canada, where
ihey have a farm, and after having
visited there for a while, and look
ed after some business as well, they
came this way tracing Canada. Mon
tana, Wyoming and Nebraska, and
arrived here last Thursday evening,
and are stopping at the home of his
nephew Sherman Cole. After hav
ing visited here they will go with
their car to Southern California, for
the winter, and return to their home
in Washington in the spring.
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