The Plattsmouth journal. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1901-current, October 14, 1918, Image 1

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VOL. XXXVI.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 14TH, 1918.
No. 34.
I
QUOTA
0,
BOWIE
THE FOLLOWING CASS COUNTY
BOYS WILL SOON DEPART FOR
CAMP BOWIE, TEXAS.
LARGE NUMBER FROM CASS
The Number Called Fcr This Time
Well Scattered Over the
Entire County.
From Friilay's Daily.
The fifty-ont' which were to have
gone to Camp Funston. but were
withheld on account of the pre
vailing epidemic, of Spanish Influ
enza are included in the call which
is to fro forward at the next time.
This quota which numbers 7S, is
almost as large as the quota which
was called the first, and which re
quired nearly a year to fill, owing
to the construction cf cantonments.
Now the government is in position
to care fcr the men more rapidly and
also to make soldiers of them more
rapidly, as well as give them better
and more intensive training at the
same time. The men called for this
time are to jio forward between
October 21st and October 25th.
Orders for the entrainment of the
boys has not as yc-t been received,
though the lists are complete and
ready when the order come. to en
train them. The following is a list
of the men with their addresses:
Clark L. Adkins, Avoca.
Wm. S. Hardaway. Wabash.
Ivan L. Thomas, Fremont.
Lee Riggs, J'lattsmouth.
Mack Riggs, PlaUsnioutb.,.,. - -...
Merl V. Long. Elmwood.
Jesse J. Cole, North Platte.
Floyd B. Haywaril, Kirksville, Mo.
(Jlen L. Whiteman. Nehawka.
A. 1. Fitzgerald. Weeping Water.
L. A. Christensen. Weeping Water.
Anthony V. Ivaynack. Elmwood.
Hay Wallace Borden, Greenwood.
Leighton O. Gordon. Greenwood.
Joseph A. Taylor, Alvo.
John Jorgensen. Avoca.
Louis L. Hite. Murdock.
Wm. L. Brown. Elmwood.
Wm. Oscar Baker. Avoca.
Merton G. Smith. Weeping Water.
Wm. l'ohlman. Omaha.
F. J. Domingo. Weeping Watr.
John E. Frady, Piattsmouth.
Clay Helms. Greenwood.
Peter II. Miller, Weeping Water.
Earnest Smith. Piattsmouth.
Thomas F. Rryan. Mauley.
John Z. Ilingst. Grant.
Charles II. Leach, Union.
Ilennings P. Johnson, Ne!iawl:a.
John W. Rodgers. Cedar Creek.
Albert W. Oehlerking. Elmwood.
Wm. It. Winn. Elmwood.
Peter It. Jorgensen, Avoca.
Harry E. Colbert. Weeping Water.
Wm. M. Mead, Union.
Charles D. Lynch, Piattsmouth.
Hugh L. Stander. Piattsmouth.
Frank W. Herger, Cedar Creek.
Henry L. Leiner. Piattsmouth.
Merton G. Welch, Gretna.
Fred C. Thimgan. South Bend.
Lorenzo D. Larson, Greenwood.
Walter J. Deitrich, Louisville.
Jesse M. Ronne, Weeping Water.
Marcus A. Dwinell. Verdigre.
Earl E. Timm, Murdock.
August. Grauf. Piattsmouth.
Otto E. Meyers. Elmwood.
Robert Swaker, University Place.
Fred A. Stock, Murdock.
Earnest H. Graham. Louisville.
Fred E. Riechman, Murdock.
Wallace A. Tarns, Omaha.
Robert E. Jordan, Piattsmouth.
Roy F. Reuse, Greenwood.
, Lem Hendricksen, Piattsmouth.
William C. Lynch. Piattsmouth.
Geo. R. Shoemaker, Nehawka.
Carl E. Egenberger, Piattsmouth.
Walter J. Reeder, Elmwood.
BenJ. H. Squires, Wabash.
James E. Deal, riattsmouth.
Earl P. Hackenberg, Cedar Creek.
Carl Kent. Union.
Sherman Austin, Union.
Earl Milton Long, Elmwood.
: John T. Gillett, Elmwood.
'. Harry II. Williams. Elmwood.
Elbert E. Taylor, Alvo.
LeRoy W. Haslam, Weeping Wat.
Vance II. Bolem, Greenwood.
Willie Graham, Louisville.
Willie A. Backmeyer, Greenwood.
John C Watson, Percival, Iowa.
George R. Swartz, Elmwood.
J. E. Ryan, Kansas City.
DIES OF SPANISH INFLUENZA.
From Friday's Dally.
Last evening Rev. M. A. Shine
departed for Cedar Bluffs, where he
was caUed to attend the funeral of
Rev. Joseph Stockinger, the presid
ing priest at Colon, and who is to be
buried at Cedar Bluffs. Father
Stockinger had an attack of the
Spanish Influenza, and while he was
strong, combatted the disease for a
time, but when the complication of
pneumonia set, he succumbed. Fath
er M. A. Shine will officiate at the
celebration of the funeral rites.
CLASSIFICATION OF
AVOCA PRECINCT
THIRTY-SIX BETWEEN AGES OF
IS AND 36, LESS THAN
AMOUNT ENLISTED.
From Friilay's Pally.
The Local Board yesterday classi
fied Avoca Precinct, as to depend
ency, and is not in the hands of the
District Board for their action as to
occupation. Avoca has in the ages
ranging between 18 and 36 not
heretofore classified 3K, but she has
furnished more than that by enlist
ment alone, before this, not includ
ing the number of selectmen, which
she furnished. The following ia
the classification by the local board:
Avoca Precinct.
Arthur Lyman Wolph 1-a.
Fred Francis Weber 1-a.
Albert Joseph Shumaker 1-a.
Tim Harry Peter 1-a.
Julian Neumeister 3-b.
Fred McGrady 4-a.
Henry Meyers 2-a.
George D. Maseman 2-a.
George D. Martin 1-a.
-.- Howard r Maple t-g. "
Walter Daniel Lore 2-a.
Henry Jorgensen 1-a.
August L. Hunteman 4-a.
Lester M. Hoback 4-a.
Roy C. Harshman 1-a.
William M. Gallnor 4-a.
Herman F. Frendenberg 4-a.
Frank L. Cottingham 1-a.
Clarence B. Goodman 1-a.
Claud M. Durham 1-a.
William W .Click 4-a.
Earnest R. Carroll 4-a.
Gustin M. Borgeson 4-a.
Fred E. Betts 4-a.
John W. Betts 1-a. '
Herman F. Behrns 2-a.
Lloyd E. Bates 4-a.
John E. Baier 2-a.
, John S. Adkins 4-a.
August W. Langenberg 5-e.
William N. McLenon Z-u.
Charles E. Hoover 4-a.
WILL ENDEAVOR 10
KEEP THE CITY SAFE
THIS CITY VERY CLEAR OF
SPANISH FLU, AND WILL EN
DEAVOR TO KEEP SO.
From Thursday's Daily.
While there are probably a few
cases, of Spanish Influenza, every
precaution is being taken, in the
line of quarantine, and the refusing
of bodies of people to meet, where
they are kept in close compact bod
ies, the moving picture shows have
been closed, the religious meetings
deferred until such a time as there
shall be less danger of contaigon.
There is a move to hold the relig
ious gatherings in the open, which
would be safe as out of doors, there
is only the slightest danger. Many
complaints --as heard about the
schools continuing, and it is not
known as yet just what action will
be taken in that direction.
HAS BEEN SEEDING
LAND TO WHEAT
Fiom Thursday's Dally.
C. L. Schaefer, who has been in
the western portion of the state for
the past three weeks, where he was
seeding some of his land near Bar
clay, to wheat, returned home this
morning, having just put in forty
five acres. He left there last night,
and at the time of his departure he
said it had rained for four hours
hard, and everything was well soak
ed. The wheat he says is looking
fine.
DEATH CLAIMS
GLEN C. EDWARDS
BRONCHIAL PNEUMONIA CLAIMS
ONE OF PLATTSMOUTH'S FIN
EST YOUNG MEN TODAY.
FOUGHT A VALIANT FIGHT
Only to Lose the Battle For Life,
When All Had Been
Done.
From Friday's Daily.
At ten minutes after two o'clock
this afternoon, after fighting for his
life, during the entire night and to
day, the spirit of one of the finest
young men of this city Glen Chesley
Edwards, took its flight to the oth
er world. Glen Edwards was just
twenty-three years of age and had
been employed with the Burlington,
in the capacity of switchman, until
about ten days since, where he was
taken with acute Bronchial Pneu
monia, and has since been connneu
to his home.
He has had the best of care and
nursing, nut notwitnstanaing ine
noble fight for life, and for the
comradship of his family, of whom
he was very fond, it was apparent
manv hours Derore tnat nope or ins
ife was ebbing. He leaves besides
his wife and little son, William, four
sisters, they being Mrs. John D. Mc-
Bride. of Omaha, Mrs. J. H. Hagger
ty of Colorado. Mrs. D. B. Prother of
Iowa, and Mrs. C. O. Larson of
Omaha. Mr. Edwards was born in
this city and was 23 years of age
May 3rd. No arrangements as yet
for , the funeral, but announcement
will be made later.
BUY ANOTHER BOND
AND BUY IT 1101
YOU WHO HAVE NOT YET MADE
THE PURCHASE. GET AFTER
IT AND DO IT NOW.
Frorr. Thursday's Dally.
Just because you are ' thinking
that the war is nearing the close,
is no reason why you should not
take all the bonds, which
possibly can handle. The
punch, or the knockout blow
quires much of a punch to it.
you
last
boys are only too anxious to give
it on their part, we should be more
than willing to give it on our part
Even in these last battles, there will
be many of the boys lost, it cannot
be otherwise, and will we try to
save our dollars, while they are not
under cover. Some will probably
figure, they will whip the hun
anyway, and withhold the last pur
chase they had figured on making,
this is a little cowardly don't you
think so? Far better take an extra
one, for the boys are still over there
and fighting now, and if they should
stop, it will cost a lot to bring them
home, and pay the necessary ex
penses. Better come across with
another unit. It will not hurt, and
it will help, and that materially. -
HAS ENLISTED IN THE AVIATION
From Thursday's Dally.
Clarence Mason a few days since
was in Omaha and there enlisted in
the aviation department of the U. S.
service, and yesterday tcok the ex
amination before the local board
here. Clarence is an excellent me
cshanic and has had a large amount
of experience with gas engines.
FUNERAL OF ROBERT DENHAM.
From Friday's Dally.
The funeral of Robert Denham
who died last Sunday was held Wed
nesday morning at 10 o'clock from
the' St. Theresa Cathedral and the
remains were laid to rest in the
Calvary cemetery. Robert Denham
was a son-in-law of John Nashel of
this city and a brother-in-law of
Mrs. Ignac Straka and Mrs. Mickeal
Robb, they all being present at the
funeral, also John Nashel Jr., of
Gregory, South, Dakota, and Mrs.
Joseph Polak of Hartington, Nebr.
RETURNS FROM VISIT IN WEST.
From Friday's E-ally.
Clyde Claus, who some months
since departed for the west, where
he visited in the southwestern por
tion of this state, and in Kansas,
later going to Laramie, Wyoming,
where he visited with his aunt, re
turning to his parents J. F. Claus
home at South Omr.ha, where he
visited for a short time, arrived in
Piattsmouth this afternoon.
Clyde says the west is in good
condition with the exception that
the livig is extremely high.
BEN WINDHAM RE
CEIVES PROMOTION
AS A RESULT OF HARD AND
PERSISTENT APPLICATION TO
HIS STUDIES IS ADVANCED.
From Saturday's Dally.
A long letter from Ben Windham
to his father, which he received yes
terday tells of a promotion for this
young man, and says that he has
been advanced to the electrical de
partment, by reason of hard study.
The library on the ship provides
courses of study, and he has taken
up this work, with the result that
he has made good progress and has
been thus advanced. Mr. Windham's
former experience has been a good
help to him. He gives a very vivid
description of the appearance of the
ocean, which we copy an extract.
"Last night, beautiful night I
spent on the sea. It was blowing
up a considerable amount of waves,
and as they would break, a phosphor
escent glow would appear on the
water; you could see this glow as
far as the eyes could reach; and in
the wake of the ship, would be a
great strip of-waiir-that looked like
it was on fire, caused by the churn
ing of the propeller. I assume it
looked like the river styx, or what
ever Dnates dividing river of fire
was called; a great expanse of dark
ness, broken only by thousands of
spots and streaks of liquid fire. With
fast blowing clouds from the stream
or vapor arising from the "River of
fire." The only thing that is lack
ing is the ancient Ferryman, but a
little imagination will do wonders
in producing said boatman."
GHARLES LAHODA
MISSING IN FRANCE
PLATTSMOUTH BOY MISSING IN
BATTLE IN FRANCE, THIR
TEENTH LAST MONTH.
From Saturday's Daily.
A telegram received from Wash
ington tells of the missing of one I
of the fighting boys of Piattsmouth,
which occurred in France on Sep
tember Thirteenth. Charles Lahoda
departed from here during the sum
mer, going to Camp Funston, but
ennn fnnnd his wav to France, where
he has been doing valiant fighting,
having made the enemy pay the pen
alty for the capture, which they
have made of him. The message
which was received by his mother
reads as follows:
Washington, D. C, Oct. 10th.
Mrs. C. Lahoda,
Piattsmouth, Nebr.,
Deeply regret to inform you that
Private Charles C. Lahoda is offi
cially reported as missing in action,
since September Thirteenth. Will re
port first information received.
HARRIS.
Acting The Adjutant General.
What has become of this Piatts
mouth boy, no one knows, whether
he has been killed or captured, but
the presumption is that he is a pris
oner.
FOR SALE.
50 yards of good grade Linoleum,
good as new.
One hot air furnace and pipes in
good condition.
One American Radiator Co. "Arco.
hot water heating plant, size 4x28.
Used one year, good as new.
T. H. POLLOCK.
Telephone No. 1.
12-3td2tw.
A want ad will bring what you want
THE WAY THE
TANKS SEE IT
A LETTER FROM A SOLDIER IN
FRANCE TELLS OF THE VIC
TORY OF AMERICANS IN
FRANCE.
LIKES THE WW THINGS GO
Gives Description 0 The Country
And How They Are Living
There.
From Friday's Daily.
The following letter from Sgt.
Frank York to his mother Mrs. O.
L. York of this place shows with
what hopes the soldiers of America,
are going after the buns in France:
A. P. O. France. Sept. 16.
Dear Mother:
Your letter of Aug. 20th at hand
today. As you have seen by the
headlines, the last couple of days,
the boys have been having a little
fun lately, and a mighty good job
they have made of it, everybody are
rejoicing over the great victory. I
am almost tempted to go out and
celebrate a little myself. Of course
we were not a bit surprised, because
we all knew that they could uo it.
If there was any surprise party, it
was the ones on the other side.
Whether they have gotten their
brains working enough to compre
hend the joke or not Is more than
I can tell. Anyway the square head
will have something to think about
for a while.
Well about Cecil, I think the
navy, is the best place for him to
enlist in. He .will have it much
easier than at the front with the
Doughboys. The infantry is no place
for a man that is not robust and
strong. Most of my pals, who left
Chicago when I did are in the ser
vice. I had some experience in the
naval training station and I would
like to have j-ou impress the matter
of discipline on his mind. The navy
is more strict than the army, but as
long as a man keeps his mouth shut
and does what he is told to he will
get along all right. The less he has
to say the better he is off. things
will seem a little queer and hard at
first, but you will get used to them.
A soldier or a sailor is required to
do anything that is to be done, and
one that slacks in any respect is not
a soldier or sailor. There is no
shirking at this time, we are win
ning, but there can be no let up, the
more all men do, the sooner we will
have the kaiser's scalp, and we are
anxious to get back to God's coun
try. We are all working ever here.
France is one big workhouse, but
we are doing our work carefully.
with no regard to hours, or anything
else
It is getting "most time here now
for winter to come. I expect to be
here most of the winter. Write
often and tell me all the news. With
much love to you mother and every
lone else.
SGT. FRANK YORK.
Address Signals G. Tq. A. P. O.
706, A. E. F., France.
LANDS ON THE
SOIL OF FRANCE
CAPTAIN G. H. GILMOUR LANDS
SAFELY OVER SEAS AND
NOTIFIES JOURNAL.
I From Friday's Daily.
This morning our Robert A. Bates
received a card announcing the safe
arrival of Captain Geo. II. Gilmour
M. C. 809th Pioneer Infantry over
seas, captain unmore nas not oeen
away from his home town but a
short time, first after having en-
listed he was sent to Camp Dodge
for a short time, and was' . 'then
hastened to France, where he is now
into the work, taking with .him: all
of the years of experience 'which
his varied practice has brought him.
Captain Gilmore will make an ex
cellent man-for the .purpose for
which he has offered his service.
Journal Want-Ads Fay I
WITH BURLINGTON 22 YEARS.
From Friday's Daily.
J. W. Sk-ver, resigned his posi
tion in the Burlington shop last
night and will in a short time de
part for the western portion of the
state, where he will make li is home
on the Holurege ranch, winch is
few miles from Madrid, and will live
with his son-in-law Frank Rennie,
and family. Mr. Sievtr has been
in the employ of the 'Burlington for
the past twenty-two years and has
lost but a very small percent of the
time during the period.
THEY THINK THE
NORTHWEST GREAT
JOHN M. VORNDRON AND JOHN
J. CLOIDT THINK NORTHWEST
WORTH THE PRICE.
From Friday's Daily.
Yesterday John M. Vorndron and
John J. Cloidt, returned from a few
lays in the northwest, where they
have been to see the farm of Mr.
Vorndron. and the country surround-
ng it. Some four years since Mr.
Vorndron bought the farm and at
hat time, it was 11 miles from
Crookston, he had not been there
since, and the country had settled
and has been fenced, it now takes
14 miles of travel to get there.
Mr. Cloidt was greatly surprised
at the things which grow there,
potatoes lare as good FiZd goards.
and of the best quality, while they
have excellent corn, and the cattle
and hogs which they raise there. In
heir trip up the Crookston, they
met seven cattle trains coming to
Omaha, which is evidence of what
that country is doing.
HARY WARTHEN BREAKS ARM.
From Thursday's Daily.
Harry Warthen of Omaha arriv
ed here this afternoon for a short
visit at Ills home folks. Harry had
an accident about a week since while
working as a motornian on the
Omaha street railway, and has not
been able to work, and come home
for a visit during the time. His arm
is gett.'ng along as well as could be
expected under the circumstances.
MRS. WM. BELL VISITING HERE.
Frrnn Fridny's Dally.
Mrs. William Bell of Davenport,
Iowa, arrived in this city this morn
ing, for a visit at the home of her
parents Mr. and Mrs. C. Wolforth.
Mr. Bell will arrive in a short time,
for a short visit also, and to return
with Mrs. Bell. Raymond Bell a
younger brother will depart in a few
days to enter the training school at
Ames, Iowa, as an enlisted member
of the United States army.
-3-- II II
BANKING BY Uhl
- Patrons and others who find it incon
venient to call in person to deposit their
funds can make their deposits by mail
with absolute safety.
We accept deposits from any part of
the county, mail patrons receiving the
same careful and prompt attention and
the same degree of protection as do our
local patrons.
Deposits may be sent safely by check,
draft or money-order. Currency may be
also sent through the mails with safety if
the later is registered.
We solicit mail accounts, by large and
small.
First National Bank
Piattsmouth. Nebraska
mm
Wm
8
ANOTHER PLATTS
BOY
MAKES
0000
WASHINGTON DISPATCHES SHOW
THE COMMISSIONING OF
EDMOND L. SPIES AS
FIRST LIEUTENANT U. S. ARMY
An Excellent Young; Man, Born In
This City, Educated Here,
Receives Recognition.
From FrMay's Daiir.
The morning dispatches show the
receiving by KrtmonJ L. Spies of a
commission of First Lieutenant, In
the United States Army. Kdniond
was born in this city and Is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Spies dur
ing his time in school, he worked
with his father and became an effi
cient cigar maker at which he has
worked. Later after having finished
school he went in to the Hurlington
shops and became an excellent ma
chinist and going to the west settled
n Colorado, where he liked it on a
ohemstead until he had proven up on
it. Returning he purchased a home
in this city, and then offered his
services to his country, and was ac
cepted, the family still remaining
as citizens of this city. After enter
ing the service he by unstinted ap
plication, and hard work and study,
has been given a commission as
First Lieutenant. Mr. Spies is de
serving of the recognition which
come to him,eand we expect to see
him merit and obtain still more.
IS. JACK ELLEGE
DIED YESTERDAY
FUNERAL WILL BE AT COUNCIL
BLUFFS FRIDAY. LEAVES
TWO GIRLS AND ONE BOY.
From Thursday' Dally.
After a sickness extending over a
number of weeks, with stomach
trouble, Mrs. Jack Ellege died last
evening at her home in Council
Bluffs. The funeral will be held at
one o'clock at the late heme in
Council Bluffs and the burial be
made at that place. On account of
the prevailing epidemic, the body
could not be brought to this place
for burial, as was desired. Mrs. Cl
lege leaves besides her husband, two
daughters and one son. Mr. Ellege
is a son of Mrs. J. B. Iligley of this
city and a nephew of John and
Mahlon Richardson, who live near
the ferry.
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