The Plattsmouth journal. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1901-current, November 01, 1917, Image 1

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    Neb Btalo Historical Soc
VOL. XXXV.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER, 1, 1917.
No.
33.
I
TWO LETTERS
FROM OUR BOYS
AT DEMING, N. II
BUEHLER METCALFE AND HAR
RY WINSCOTT WRITE TO
FRIENDS HERE.
TELL OF THE REORGANIZATION
State Work Getting Harder as They
Continue Training All Buy
Liberty Bonds to Aid.
HEADQUARTERS COMPANY C
lfith Machine Gun Battalion
SIXTY-SEVENTH BRIG.
Camp Cody, Deming, Oct. IS.
I). C. Morgan, Esq.,
Plattsmouth, Nebr.
Dear Mr. Morgan: I saw j'ou as we
were passing through Plattsmouth
en route to Deming,, but the train
did not stop long enough for me to
even get oft.
The reorganization of the Division
here, including the split up of the
Sixth, has left us in very good shape.
Our company remains intact and in
addition we took in 91 men of the
Second Iowa Infantry. Our full war
strength under the new order of
things is 172 men. We will soon
start on an intensive course of train
ing that will cover three or four
months.
I recall the conversation I had
with you during the organization of
the Sixth regiment and I can indeed
say that my company got the cream
of young men in Plattsmouth. They
are a, fine bunch of l)oya and l am
mighty proud of them. We have al
ready won recognition throughout
the camp. The men are all in ex
cellent health and are receiving the
very best possible attention. I have
sat around the mess tables of many
army organizations and I think I am
safe in saying that the mess which is
put up in our company is the best
army mess I ever ate. All of the of
ficers of our organization, including
myself, are eating with the men and
are given the same food that the men
are given.
Let me hear from you when you
have time. With best wishes to you
and Colonel Bates and my other
I'lattsmouth friends and with assur
ance to the mothers and fathers of
Plattsmouth who have placed me in
custody of their sons, that these boys
will be well cared for, I am.
Sincerely yours,
BUEHLER METCALFE,
Captain Commanding.
P. S. The company subscribed $10,
700.00 for Liberty bonds in less than
2 4 hours.
Camp Cody. N. M., Oct. 24.
Mr. M. S. Briggs.
Plattsmouth, Neb.
My Dear Friend: Your letter at
hand since the 21st, I will try and
answer it at this time. I am glad
ito hear from you and to hear that
everything in Plattsmouth is pro
gressing. Those improvements will
make 'Old Platts loom up among the
cities of its size. Ail the boys in the
camp from Plattsmouth which I have
an opportunity to see are getting
along all right, and generally like
th life at camp. The work here
get3 harder all the time. When I
wrote you before, we were only hav
ing three hours of calesthentics, the
remainder of the day being devoted
to keeping things tid5 such as
quarters, clothes and our persons.
Now we have two hours of Swedish
exercises which is hard, two hours
of study of horses, two hours of
study of the mechanism of our guns,
and map drawings and two hours of
studying andlearn'n how to be
courteous to our superiors and, fellow
men. These duties almost take up
the whole day, and is expected to
last sixteen weeks, and after this
time we should have a fairly good
idea of what i3 expected of us. Cu
Wednesdays and Saturdays we ire
expected to have the afternoon to de
vote to athletics. Every one is ex
pected to take part in omrthitig. Wc
have wrestling, boxing, re'.ay races,
various distances, dash?, jumping,
high and broad, hurtling hir.lt and
low, in fact we are expected to take
part in every sort of atletics, as well
as all kind of games as far as our
ground limits will allow us. We are
expected to practice for these events
at odd times, so you may know we
have not many idle hours now. The
more of this one takes, the better
kind of a man he will make.
How is the question of the LIB
ERTY BONDS passing around there,
we soldiers are doing our bit in buy
ing bonds with our other work. In
this we are doubling our work for
that we deem a great cause. I have
purchased one hundred dollars of
. bonds, while the most of the boys
.are taking from fifty to three hund
I red dollars worth. The officers are
buying from five hundred to fifteen
hundred, so you may see what a
help we are trying to be to our coun
try. Tell the boys of the Loyal Sons
Class "Hello" for me and also give
my best regards to the Y. P. S. C. E.
Answer soon, I remain your friend,
HARRY WINSCOTT,
Battery 'B' 127th Field Artillery,
Camp Cody, Deming, New Mexico.
JOHN MEISINGER, JR. CEL
EBRATES 39TH BIRTHDAY
From "Monday's Daily.
Yesterday at his home, seven miles
west of this city, the friends of John
Meisinger jr., gathered and made
merry on account of his thirty-ninth
birthday. There were present a
large number of relatives and friends
and a jolly good time was had, with
an excellent dinner. There were
from this city C. A. Harvey and wife,
Mrs. George Godwin and wife, Oliver
Harvey and Miss Fay Crook, Herbert
Thacker and Miss Bental Stone, Mrs.
Arthur Kern of Omaha and E. J.
Harvey also of Plattsmouth.
MRS. JACOB HEIRICH CEL
EBRATED 50TH BIRTHDAY
From Monday'. Daily.
Yesterday, at her home in this
city, surrounded by all her children,
Mrs. Jacob Heirich celebrated the
fiftieth anniversary of the day of her
birth. The children present were
Mrs. H. K. Zavgren with her hus
band and son, John, grandson of
Mrs. Heinrich; John Heinrich, who
lives in Lincoln; Thomas Heinrich,
of Omaha; Tillie Pastsch and daugh
ter, Deloras; Mrs. Mike Kaffenberger
and husband from southwest of the
city and Frances and Lena of this
place. In addition there were some
fifty friends of this good lady pres
ent to congratulate her upon the oc
casion of her birthday and wish her
many more of the same kind, filled
with joy and greetings from friends
innumerable. The house was crowd
ed and all were served with a boun
tiful dinner. The occasion was one
enjoyed to the fullest extent by ev
ery one of the large number pres
ent.
GRAND ARMY WILL ENTER
TAIN THE W. R. G'S. SOON
From Monday's Daily.
At a meeting of the Grand Army
of the Repubic Saturday afternoon
at their rooms at the court house, to
purchase two LIBERTY BONDS of
the' $50. 00. In this action the Mc
Connahie Post have shown their pa
triotism, and they are the boys who
gave it without a question.
The members of the post are
chivalrous as well as patriotic, for
they perfected arrangements to have
a social meeting at the home of Com
rade Thomas W. Glenn's home cn
November Sixth, at two in the af
ternoon, at which time they will en ¬
tertain the members of the Womaa's
Relief Corps. Refreshments will bo
served and reminisences of the trip
to Vicksburg will be given of the
Peace Jubilee by all those who were
in attendance at the meeting at
Vicksburg.
FRANK MILLER AT DEMING NOW
From Mondav's Dally.
Frank Miller, who was in the hos
pital at Omaha for so long, on ac
count of an injury received, mak
ing his back lame, is so improved
that he has been sent to the can
tonment at Camp Cody at Deming
New Mexico, and since getting there
is feeling fairly well. His folks have
received a letter fYora him since his
arrival thre.
S30 ADDED TO
THE ATHLETIC
FUNDS TODAY
PEOPLE SHOWING LOTS OF IN
TEREST AND MONEY IS
GIVEN FREELY.
BUT ONE MORE DAY REMAINS
On Friday the Journal Will Forward
All Money Realized to the
Cass County Boys.
From Wednesday's Daily.
The closing days of the big two
weeks' drive undertaken by the Jour
nal to raise funds with which to aid
the promulgation of athletics among
Cass county soldier boys in camp at
Fort Riley (Camp Funston) and at
Deming (Camp Cody) are days of
real success. Since last Saturday
these funds have grown steadily un
til today they assume very preten
tious proportions and the end is not
yet. There remains yet tomorrow
no longer, as on Friday the Journal
will send all the money collected in
each of the funds to the Cass coun
ty soldier boys to use for the pur
chase of suplies and paraphernalia.
And they will not be "one-man"
funds, either. Every Cass county
boy in the camps will have as much
ndividual interest in the money and
how it is spent as every other one.
On behalf of the boys our boys
your boys who are out there train-
ng vigorously to fit themselves for
soldiers to fight, and mayhaps give
theirjives in defense-of the princi
ples every American holds dear, we
appeal to the people of Cass county
and Plattsmouth not to let tomor
row's contributions lag behind those
of today, but rather to make them
exceed those of any single day dur-
ng the campaign and we believe
they will.
The total contributions to date, in
cluding those received since yester
day, are as follows:
Camp Funston Fund
The Daily Journal $ 5.00
C. Morgan 5.00
Weyrich & Hadraba 5.00
J. E. McDaniels. foot ball 10.00
Bruce Rosencrans 1.00
James Sage 1 5.00
Ed Schuhloff 3.00
Loyal Sons Class 2.50
A. M. Arries 1.00
Frank Neuman
1.00
1.00
1.00
Wm. Barclay
Thomas Walling
E. J. Richey 5.00
Cosmopolitan Club 5.00
John Kopia 1.00
Frank Slavicek 1.00
A. S. Will 5.00
T. H. Pollock 7.50
Dr. F. L. Cummins 1.00
N. W. Chrisinger 1.00
M. Bajeck .50
Henry R. Gering 10.00
Mrs. Mary L. Wiley, Murray .50
Mrs. Addie E. Park, Murray- .50
Andy Snyder 2.50
T. J. Girls 2.50
Frank Bashus 1.00
Wm. Holly 1.00
J. K. Pollock : 2.00
C. Rosencrans .50
Will Jean .50
Claude Shoemaker 1.00
Ed Thrall 1.00
L. W. Lorenz 1.00
C. M. Parker, 1.00
Fetzer Shoe Co . 2.50
Arthur Troop 2.50
Judge J. T. Begley 1.00
R. B. Windham 1.50
Dr. E. W. Cook 2.50
Camp Cody Fund
The Daily Journal S 5.00
D. C. Morgan 5.00
James Sage 5.00
Ed Schuhloff 3.00
Loyal Sons Class I 2.50
A. M. Arries 1.00
Thomas Walling 1.00
Wm. Barclay 1.00
E. J. Richey - 5.00
Cosmopolitan Club 5.00
Weyrich & Hadraba 5.00
T. H. Pollock 7.50
Dr. F. L. Cummins
N. W. Chrisinger
M. Bajeck -
C. E. Hanley
1.00
1.00
.50
.50
.50
I Paul Stadelman
Henry R. Gering 10.00
Mrs. Mary L. Wiley, Murray. .50
Mrs. Addie E. Park, Murray. .50
B. B. Warthen 1.00
Webster Warthen '. 1.00
Andy Snyder 2.50
T. J. Girls 2.50
Wm. Holly 1.00
J. E. McDaniel 2.00
J. K. Pollock 2.00
Frank Kalasek 1.00
George Winscott, 1.00
Claude Shoemaker 1.00
Ed Thrall 1.00
L. W. Lorenz. 1.00
C. M. Parker ... 1.00
Fetzer Shoe Co... 2.50
Arthur Trocp 2.50
Judge J. T. Begley 1.00
R. L5.. Windham 1.50
Miss Gertrude Morgan .5
Dr. E. W. Cook 2.50
COSTS EIGHT DOLLARS TO
COME ACROSS FROM CANADA
From Monday's Dally.
Will P. Ilice and wife were pass
engers to Omaha this morning,
where they will visit for the day af
ter which they will go to Glenwood,
Iowa, for a visit. They have just
returned from their home in Canada
where they spent the summer, re
turning to the States because of the
severity of the Canadian winters,
which are extremely cold. Mrs. Rice
says she will not return to Canada,
on account of the right dollars head
tax, which is now being levied for
every one who crosses the border,
coming this way. The provisions of
ihe tax is that should thev return
by the 16th of May that the amount
will be returned.
AVhen crossing a complete history
cf the person is taken with their
picture, and personal description.
weight, age and height.
THE RIFLE RANGE IS
DESERTED ONCE AGAIN
From Monday's Daily.
The boys from Fort Crook, who
have been practicing at the Rifle
Range north of the city for some
time past have all gone and left the
place as deserted as it was before
they came. There were a large num
ber of men there practicing and many
good records were made. The weath
er became so bad during the latter
part of their stay that it was not
possible to obtain results commen
surate with the time and energy
spent.
DID YEOMAN SERVICE IN
SALE OF LIBERTY BONDS
From Monday's Daily.
The First National Bank of Green
wood, which was asked to sell $14,-
000.00 of Liberty Bondf, did it and
then did not feel that tlieir mission
in the matter was ended, and kept up
the pace '-'Which it was setting by
selling that many more, and having
a little time left, sold $3,400 more,
making in all $31,400, which 'was
doing their 'Bit' and then some. This
is not as boasting but, it is just en
thusiastic working along the line in
which their heart is. The cause was
there the opportunity existed, and
they were in it, for the cause of
country and home.
RECEIVES GOOD POSITION. .
From Monday's Daily.
Miss Marie Robertson, who has
been visiting over, Sunday at the
home of her parents Mr. and Mrs.
J. M. Robertson in this city, de
parted this morning for Kearney,
where she recently has been elected
as an instructor in the State Nor
mal school at that place.
Miss Robertson is to be congrat
ulated upon the election to this posi
tion and we are sure she will more
than make good at the work.
HERE FROM CANADA.
From Monday's Daily.
Will Rice came in last Saturday
from Omaha, where he has been
visiting for a short time, and will
visit with friends and relatives here
and at Glenwood, Iowa. Mr. and
Mrs. Rice are making their homo i t
Maple Grove, Canada, where they
have been farming the past year
where they have a nice farm.
Call Plattsmouth Garage for serv
ice. Tel. S94, also livery. J. E Mason,
Prop.
PLAN TO ELIMI
NATE GERMAN
FROM CHURCH
PASTOR OF KOTJNTZE MEMORIAL
STARTS MOVEMENT AT GEN
ERAL COUNCIL.
SAYS CHANGE RAPIDLY COMING
Says Immigrants ''Should Adopt the
Language and Customs of
Their Country.'
Omaha, Nebr., October 20, 1917.
The Rev. O. D. Blatzly, pastor of
Kountze Memorial Lutheran church,
who last spring was quoted as say
ig he believed "this to be Mr. Wil
son's war" is leader of a national
movement in the Lutheran church
to substitute English for German
and other foreign languages.
The movement was begun at the
annual convention of the general
council of the church which has been
in session at Philadelphio. Dr.
Baltzly who was a special commis
sioner to the council returned to
Omaha Monday night.
The merger of the general con
ference, the general synod and the
United Synod of the South into an
organization to be known as the
United Lutheran Church of Amer
ica, was affected.
Speaking of the movement to do
away with the use of German in the
church. Dr. Baltzls said:
"The thing any foreigner coming
to this country should do is to get
into the English speaking church at
once, no natter from what country
he comes.
Urges Adoption of U. S. Customs.
"People coming here ! j make
their homes should adopt the lang
uage and customs cf tin country as
fa?t as possible.
"You can't quote me too strongly
on that question."
The change already is rapidly oc
curring, Pr. Blatzly said.
"The new organization, the Unit
ed Lutheran Church cf America."
he said, "will have over a million
members. Most of these are Eng
lish-speaking and that language is
used in most of the church service?,
with a constant growth in that di
rection. The Missouri synod, anoth
er great general body of Lutherans,
with approximately 800,000 mem
bers, uses English and German, but
with a rapidly-growing preponder
ance of English.
"The same is true of the Joint
Synod of Ohio, with a membership
of perhaps 200,000, and the Iowa
synod, numbering about the same.
These two bodies will very soon, it
is understood, become a part of the
United Lutheran Church of America.
Later it is expected the Missouri
synod will also join us.
"Last May the Norwegian church
es united in the United Norwegian
Church of America, its membership
being about 600.000 and the Danish
churches are already in a similar
organization with perhaps 250,000
communicants. These, as well as
the German Lutheran churches, are
rapidly becoming Anglicised.
"I wish to say that the action of
the Philadelphia convention in unit
ing three great Lutheran bodies and
preparing the way for further unifi
cation of the people of our faith is
the most important happening in the
Lutheran church in fifty years."
One Lutheran Pastor Disapproves.
"We believe in preaching to the
people in the language" they can
understand," was the comment of
Rev. Titus Lang of the First German
Lutheran church.
"Our church is about two-thirds
English already," said Rev. M. W.
Ilalverson. pastor of the Norwegian
Danish church. "Our people rap
idly acquire the English language
and so far as possible English is used
in our churches, but Scandinavians
are all the time coming to this coun
try and their spiritual needs have
to be looked after. It is not prac
tical to adopt the English language
exclusively for this reason."
Obey the Law. Ord r your Osgood
Lens. Plattsmouth Garage. All sizes.
GETS TWO FINGERS MASHED.
From Tuesday's Dally.
Floyd Denson while working at
the Burlington shops yesterday af
ternoon sustained a painful and se
vere mash on two of his fingers
while at his usual work.. He was
working with a push car, on which
there was a load, and while attempt
ing to place a block under the
wheel, the car which was moving
mounted the block, catching two of
Floyd's fingers between the block
and the rail, mashing them severely,
but no so much so, but the chance
of them entirely recovering is' good.
He will be enforced to take a layoff
during their mending though.
WHO EVER THOUGHT A
FORD GOULD CLIMB A
GRAPEVINE? ONE DID
Frorn Monday's Dally. .
Yesterday Billy Sutley and Ever
ett McCourt, scenting snow in the
air, and not being content to set
by the radiator and toast their shins.
harnessed up their 'Fliver and de
parted for the fields where the 'Cot
ton Tails' abound, longing for the
excitement of the chase. During the
afternoon they enjoyed the sport of
the hunt, notwithstanding the fact
that the northwest winds were try
ing hard to drive them home. AVhen
the shades of eventide began to fall
o'er field and stream, they turned
the nose of the '4-d toward home and
all went well as a marriage bell un
til they reached the juncture of
Washington avenue and Elm streets.
when, to avoid crashing into an
other car coming down the avenue,
they turned sharply to the right and
landed in the grape arbor of Fred
Kunsman, with the result that three
of the posts supporting the vines
were broken and the car was badly
iamaged.- The car did not turn over,
4uU.if.it bad -it is hard to estimate
what would have happened to the
ccupants. Part of the mechanism
was put to the bad and the front end
looked like it had gone through a
railroad wreck.
We have oftentimes heard it said
that a Ford can climb a tree, but
this is the first time we have ever
heard of one attempting to climb a
grapevine. But then no one can tell
what the next attempt will be.
As a result of the wreck, John
Boetel has been minus a car today
to look after the business of trans
porting people to and from the de
pots. DISCHARGED Oil ACCOUNT
OF PHYSICAL DISABILITY
From Tuesday's Dally.
Harrison Sheldon, who was one of
the boys to enlist here forming the
"Dandy Sixth" and was sent to the
hospital at Fort Crook, on account
of sickness, was required to take a
number of examinations, five in all
of which he passed until the last,
which the examining doctors rejected
him as physically unfit for military
service. He had been at home and
received a telegram calling him to
report at Fort Crook, to receive his
discharge papers which he did yes
terday, and returned home.
Bring your welding to ns. Platts
mouth Garage. Tel. 294.
Helping Business
The Federal Reserve Banking System was
created largely to protect and benefit those en
gaged in industry, commerce and agriculture
both' employers and employees. Its main pur
pose is to help those who borrow and provide a
currency more responsive to business needs.
We are members of this system and you can
secure its benefits and add to its strength by be
coming one of our depositors.
FIRST nflTIQHQL DANK
. United States Depository
BOY SCOUTS PASS
JUVENILES TAKE TESTS ON THE
DIFFERENT BRANCHES OF
SCOUT WORK.
Figured in the Sale of Liberty Loan
Bonds Are Appointed by Chief
Barclay to Help Pre
serve the Peace.
From Tuesday'.1? Daily.
Jast evening uie boy scouts neil
a meeting at which there was a good
deal of business transacted. That
being the night for examinations.
there were various tests in different
features of the Scout work. Thoie
passing the examination for the
Tenderfoot were Harold Fitt, Claire
Hudson, Lawrence Spricker, Joe
Johnson, Leonard Walling, Charles
Egenberger, while John Ptak pass
ed the examination as a second class
scout. The board of commissioners
were present and conducted the ex
aminations, they being E. J. Wey
rich, C. C. Wescott and R. Glen
Rawls, with Charles Spacht as as
sistant scoutmaster.
The Boy Scouts figured in the sell
ing of Liberty bonds of the second
issue to no small extent. Those to
win medals for their services in this
capacity were George Schmidtman.
who sold 51.400 worth and George
Thomas, who disposed of $700 worth
while numerous others of the mem
bers sold goodly amounts.
The boys have been making such
headway in their organization and
becoming familiar with the rules
and workings, that they have been
honored by Chief of Police Barclay
by being appointed assistants to help
keep the peace during the festivities
Incident to Hallowe'en tomorrow
night.
RETURNED FROM ENJOYABLE
TRIP TO CAMP FUNSTON
Krorn Tuesday's Daily.
lesterday the party which last
Saturday departed over the Missouri
Pacific for Camp Funston. Kansas,
returned reporting a nice time, while
away and while the weather was
cold and blustry here it was not so
bad in that portion, as that was
somewhat south of here. The boys
are all enjoying fair health, and
while they are getting along in nice
shape, they naturally would like to
see the old town and their friends
here. To hear from them is next,
and a letter telling how things are
going here is eagerly read by all.
and read again by their friends.
Those to go and return yesterday
were A. S. Will and wife, Dora Will
and Opal Fitzgerald.
VISIT WITH RELATIVES HERE.
Frm Mi1a v'. Dally.
Mrs. D. M. Dickey and daughter.
Miss Edna, mother of Mrs. Clarence
Robeson and Mrs. Rolla Clark, with
her two children, from the same
place were guests in this city yes
terday at the home of Mr. and Mrs
Clarence Robeson, departing for their
home last evening on the belated
Burlington train.
Stop in and let us see just
how we can meet your par
ticular needs.