The Plattsmouth daily herald. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1883-19??, July 23, 1891, Image 1

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Piatt
aily Herald..
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FOURTH YEAR.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY JULY 23 1891
NUMBER 23
D
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)
ami
Absolutely Pure.
A cream of tartar baking powder.
Highest of all in leavening strenth.
l-itest IT. S. Ooveriiment Food Re
port. TTOKNKY A LAW.
, WINDHAM & DAVIES.
Z B. WINDHAM. JolIN A. IIAVIK.
Notary I'uMic V' l'ut'l't
ORlM fivT Bank of ('ill's Coii'ity
Plattsniouth .... Nhra-nha
TTORNKV
A. N. SULLIVAN.
Attorney at-Iaw. Will piv prompt Htfrntloii
to all ttiiiiii4 -ntruptel to liiw. oilice iu
Union block. Kant Side. Plattf month. Nrb.
IT C. MlGKK, M. I.
Al IS LOCATEII
le located at Eiit Mile Throve. He has ob
tained the office formerly occupied by
NR. MILLER
Of that dlace and can be found at all hours ex
cept w hen professionally out.
rjJUCKER SISTERS.
CAKKY A FULL LINK OH
AlLLENERY AND J-RENCH LOWERS,
We also have a dress making department. Sat
isfaction guaranteed.
Shekwood Stoke. Plattsmcuth
ID
R. A. SALISBURY
: D-M-X-T I S-T :
r.OLD i.M I'GKCELAIX CROWNS.
vIr. Steinw 'ys ane sthetic ferthe painlees ex-
tractior of teeth.
Fine Gold Work a Specialty.
Koi kwood Block I lattsnioiitli.Xeb.
J)R VIOLA M. FRENCH
, PHYSICIAN A- SCKGEON
UZize with L'r. Shipmsn
HOUKS
xsts.. rREJTCii
10 :6to VI : oo a. m. 3 : "0 to 5 : tu p. m.
: Onto 11 :00 a. in. 2 ; 00 to 4 : 00 p. in.
Telephone No vj. fLArrsMOUTH Mkk
XTEW HARDWARE STORE
S. E. HALL A SON
Keep all kinds of builders hardware on hand
and w ill supply contract r ou most lav
orable tcra s
j ROOFING :
Spoilt inn
and all kinds of tin work promptly
one order from ihe country Solicited
016 Teasl St. PLATTSMOUTH. NEB.
IS THE
L- K-A - D-1 - N G H O-1 ' - S- K
IX THE CITY FOR
y NOTIONS
KCKXISUIN; UOOUS
.ACES
KMHKOIDKKIES
i. KITCHEN NOVELTIES
TIXWAKK. i;l,AS8WAKE
ETC. ETC-
The eoods e oiler on our r, 10 and 23 cent
counters cannot be duplicated elsewhere
We hft've but one price, and that the
cheapest in town.
"THE FAIR"
- 415 STEET
ZDIEHSTTISTIRY"
IGOLD ASD PORCELAIXICROWNS
Bridge work and tine gold work a
Specialty.
SINAUS LOCAL as well as other Ian
JcsKlven Cor the painless extraction of
. MARSHALL, - Fitzgerald BlccK
SLANDERING THE COUNTRY
Ghoulish work or the Alliance
Leader.
Toieka, Kan., July 20.- P. S.
Maxon, chairman of the Finance
Committee of the Farmer's Alliance
is preparing a circular to he sent to
every alliance lecturer in the ."tale
giving alleged facts to show that
the country is going to ruin at
lightning speed. It is a part of
the "educational'' campaign and
will he operated after the same
manner as the discussion of the
suh-treasury plan. Mr. Maxon will
attempt to show that for SVJ years
the annual gold product has only
averaged fifty-three hundredths of
a cent per capita and that the Liver
pool markets controls the world
He will also urge that the
farmers are getting less each year
for their products and will also
seek to show that the increase in
population for the past ten 3-ears
in the lTnited States is smaller in
porportion than for any ten years
preceding. He argues from this
that unless there is speedy change
the United States will he depopu
lated. This material will he given
to the treasurers for publication
and distribution in about two
weeks.
Clous Brcckenfield went to Cedar
Creek to-day.
W. B. Short again visited the
metropolis to-day.
T. C. Shepherd made a business
trip to Omaha to-day.
J. M. Koborts was an Omaha pas
senger this morning.
The largest line of patent med-i
cities will be found at Brown A Bar
rett's tf
The Nebraska City Sunday
Schools are picnicing to-da' at
Wabash.
The Omaha and return for 85
cents to-morrow on account of the
great Forepaugh circis.
The telegraph reports great
damage by hail throughout the west
within the last fevr days.
Miss Hattie Latham returned
home on the flyer yesterday morn
ing from her extended visit in
Pennsylvania.
The motor line is again in trouble
and failed to run this afternoon for
want of power. We trust differences
may be satisfactorily arranged.
Don't forget the gymnastic exhi
bition and dance ot Fitzgerald
Hall Saturday evening. It will be
one of the most enjoyable evenings
of the year.
B. F. Reagan, of Lincoln, accom
panied by his wife, and daughter
Tressa was in the city yesterday
visiting his nephews. J. F. Hinshaw
and M. D. and C. S. Polk.
Fremont paralyzed the Nebraska
City nine Tuesday by a score of 12
to 0. The tour of the Nebraska City
club has taken the wind out of
their sails pretty effectually.
Ralph Hopkins, brother-in-law of
the Landlord at the Hotel Riley, is
the possessor of the New Kngland
Journal, published in Boston, 172S,
from which we clipped a fewarticles
the other day.
Fuller A Wallinger threshed for
Marten Frederick this week, getting
780 bushels of plump wheat off of
twenty-seven acres, and 413 bushels
of barley off of twelve acres. Cer
tainly a flattering turnout.
The Hekalo office kid Gust
Rhode, locally know l as "(Juong
Lee," caught his third finger on his
left hand in the press this afternoon
tearing out the nail by the root. It
must have been verj- painful, but
the kid had plenty of nerve.
The social given by the Christian
church last evening at the home of
Bird Critchfield was well attended
and a good time was had, notwith
standing the explosion of engine 12
at the B. & M. shops, which kept
many away that would otherwise
have been present.
A good lawyer was spoiled when
Dr. Butler commenced the practice
of medicine. He was attorney in
the case before Judge Barr on
Monday wherein H. D. Reed and
M. M. Butler were plaintiffs and
P. S. Armstrong and Smith were
defendants A. M. Russell appearing
for the latter. The Doctor proved
himself to be a corker in his new
role holding down the witness to
base hits and ruling out all foul
tips and high flies. Fagle.
A. O. U. W. Attention.
All members of A. O. U. W. in
Plattsmouth are invited to meet at
Rockwood Hall at 1:0 to-morrow
attend to the funeral of our late
brother Charles Hasemeir at Louis
ville by special train free,
AWFUL CATASTROPHE.
r.XJINK NO. 12 BLOWN UP AT THK
ItOUNO H0UF.
THE HOUSE A BAD WRECK.
Charley Hasemeier and John
Hardruba Instantly Killed.
Frank Mauer Seriously Injured but
Thought not Fatally--Many
Others Have a Narrow
Escape With Their
Lives.
Last evening a little before seven
o'clock people on Main street ami in
the south part of the city were star
tled by what seemed to be a heavy
explosion in the direction of
the B. A M. Shops. The Shop
whistles began to blow for help
which immediately gave notice to
the public thnt some disaster had
befallen the shops. Several shop
men who reside near by responded
to the call for aid ami it was soon
discovered that engine No. 12, which
does duty on the Nebraska City
bridge run, and which had been
completly overhauled recently, had
exploded with great force.
The engine was standing in the
east round house near the middle.
The explosion must have been one
of singular force for beside leveling
the walls of the brick and stone
building it lifted the great iron
roof high in the air from six of the
stalls, numbered from 5 to 10 in
clusive, which fell back with a
crash, destroying even more than
the first effects of the explosion.
The unfortunate victims of the
explosion were Charles Hasemeier
John Hardruba and Frank Mauer.
Charles Hasemeier, the fireman, it
seems had been working about the
engine, getting it in readiness to go
out at 7 o'clock, although lie had
traded work for the night with Sam
Hinkle. The latter had not yet ar
rived to relieve him and Engineer
McClennan was four minutes away
hurrying to the round house when
the awful explosion shook the earth
all about him. At the Jtinie of the
explosion it seems that Hasemeir
had just entered the cabof the fate
ful engine, and the engineer of 21
thinks he had turned the blower on
to raise to steam. He" was found
in the gangway, pinioned against
the coal gate of his tender with a
board through his chest. He pre
sented a sickening spectacle, his
entrails protruding and his left
hand being blown off. His head
was cut and the left side of his face
was badly scalded.
John Hardruba was the wiper and
was in the act of blocking tip the
21, which was being put in place by
hnjnneer Kasmussen. lie was
found under the broken brick
and scrap iron with a hole in the
top of the head from which his
brains protruded. He must have
been killed instantly, while Hasc
meier lingered for a few seconds
after he was found.
Frank Mauer, the other victim of
the accident, it is thought may re
cover. He was engaged wiping the
cylinder head of the 21 and was
found among the debris jammed
against the cylinder, his head badly
bruised and his left ear v it off. He
is seriously injured but the physi
cians think he will recover.
THE CAUSE
of the accident will probably never
be known with any degree of cer
tainty. The engine had been used
all duy and carried 135 pounds of
steam, and it is said 'ie steam
guage but a moment before the ex
plosion showed but ninety pounds
with the boiler well filled with wa
ter. The steam guage might have
been defective, though it is said the
safety-valve was set to blow off at
one-hundred and fiftj- pounds
which is not a dangerous head of
steam for a good boiler.
Railroad men would not hazard
an opinion but it seemed to the re
porter that a defective boiler was
their idea of the cause, as the boiler
has been in almost contant use for
about 18 years. And then the ap
pearance of the boiler, twisted and
cracked as it was, looked as though it
certainly was not of as good mater
ial as a new one would be built of.
The inquest in session to-day may
be able to threw more light upon
the matter.
THE WKECK.
A visit to the scene of the wreck
this morning, which has been made
by hundreds of people, shows but
little left standing above tin
wheels of what was known as the
12. The boiler flues lay in a heap,
but there is no vestige of the
boiler near them. The two locomo
tives on either side were badl'
wrecked by falling iron and beams
from the roof. One piece of the
boiler went up in the air and came
down in stall 4, only harming the
roof in that stall.
Charles Hasemeier, one of the
victims of the catastrophe claimed
by death, was but twenty-eight
years of age and had resided with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John
Hasemeier, for more than twenty1
years on their farm five
miles east of Louisville.
He was an industrious steady, ex
emplary 3-oung man. his number
of friends being limited only by the
number of his acquaintances. He
was married to a Miss Woods of
Iowa about three years ago. who is
so suddently bereft of a devoted
husband. The only child died a
few months ago. The deceased
held a $2,C: ) policy of life insurance
in the A. O. U. W. and one for like
amount in the Burlington Relief
and one for 1,(KK) in some
co-operative association making a
total of 5,c::).
The remains will be taken to Lou
isville this evening and the funt ral
will probably occur to-morrow.
John Hardruba, the other victim,
is said to have been 37 years of
age and leaves a wife and three chil
dren, the eldest being about eight
years of age. He held no insur
ance so far as we have been able to
learn.
.NOTES
The company has kindly tendered
a free train for the A. O. V. W. and
immediate friends of the late Chas.
Hasemeier to attend the funeral at
Louisville to-morrow. The train
will leave the depot here proniptly
at 1:45 to-morrow afternoon.
The damage inflicted by the ex
plosion will reach $20.(KK), besides
the loss of life.
The boiler on engine 12 once had
a two weeks' bath in the Platte
river.
No two men seem to agree as to
the cause of the explosion. The
concensus of public opinion seems
to believe that the boile - was de
fective. Charles Hasemeier's wife was
sick and he was getting his engine
ready for Sam Hinkle, who was s:
little late in getting around. Sam
congratulates himself that he was
late.
Charley Miller got a few bricks in
the back but was not hurt to
amount to anything.
The coroner's inquest begun last
night and after viewing the scene
of the explosion and examining two
witnesses to-day adjourned 'til 10
o'clock to-morrow.
An attache of THE HFKAT.O was
standing in thedoor of stall
at the round house when
the exolosion occurred. He
says the report was not loud
enough for a heavy head of steam.
He was struck on the arm with a
brick and dodged a lubricater that
was coming down through the air.
Judge Archer has a habit of go
ing home through the round house
but last evening he went around
and was only a few steps away
when the engine was blown to
pieces. He thinks he had a close
call.
Pieces of the bell on No. 12 were
picked up in the shop yard several
rods from the scene of the accident.
A large forceof men undercharge
of F. H. Steimker were rapidly
clearing away the several carloads
of debris from the old round house
this morning.
Lisbet Waugh entertained a large
company of her little friends last
evening in honor of Miss Julia
Snively and Miss Kate Tidball, of
Crete, and Miss Myers, a niece of
Mrs. Fred Herrman, from Water
town.Wis. Suitable games were in
dulged in and choice refreshments
were served and thoroughly en
joyed. Those presented beside
those named above were: Rose
Wintersteen, Lu Smith, Clair Drum
mond, Anna Pollock, May Baird.
Edith Shedd of Ashland. Minnie
and Florence White, Nellie
Leonard, Lu and Bertha White.
Jennie McElwain, Berta Bennett,
Myrtle Levings and Anna Hassler.
County Clerk Bird Critchfield left
this morning for Auburn, Neb.
Additional local on last page
READ AND LOOK
SPECI-A
AT THIS
IN 0RD3R TO REDUCE OUR STOCK OF
EMBROIDERED
WE HAVE
Deep Gut
Oik; lot of Flounciiigs at '.V-h;
worth loulk;
One lot of white I oinicin at
S2.00; pattern worth $;J 00.
One lot of white cream and
Flouncings reiluced to 3.20. A
pattern of this lot comprises goods
2) 0
ALL OF OUR FANCY PLUSH ORNAMENT
REDUCED TO 5 CENTS EACH.
F. HERRMANN
nwAi for Cash only
Ha ing purchased the U. V. Mathew's in
terest in the firm of J W, Hendee & Co, I now
propose to stay in Plattsmouth and sell hard
ware FOR - CASH - ONLY
At prices that are within the reach of all. Everything in our stock a bar
gain. Look over our list and see if you cannot find some
thing you need.
of iO Hi
4500 lbs cut nails. 3c per 11. to close 200 doz carpet tacks, 1c per paper
75c t grass scythe for55cts Best clothes wringer made, $2.10
Step ladders from 00 cts up 0 cent spades for 5 cts.
Tinware at reduced prices H ct handsaws fori5cts
Brooms. 15 to 25c ts Churns, SOcts to $1'00
Chopping bowls. 10 to 34cts Wash boards, lOcts
Bushel corn baskets, 19cts
Leather back all bristle horse brushes, 75c.
Leather back all bristle horse brushes, 40c.
Cook stoves at cost to close.
ooOoo
Other articles too numerous to mention at correspondingly Jowjprices
Come and see us. Remember we sell to everybody alike
NOT - ONE - CENT - OB - TIME.
J W HENDEE
SPECIAJL
IN 0UU C031PLETE STOCK OF
Ladies, Misses, Boys, Children
and Infants Summer Goods.
THEV AfcE Alt FIHST GUS8
AND OF THE VERY LATEST STYLE.
AiRCAOIftSS
CALL AND BE
SALE .
FLOUNCINGS,
MADE A
in Prices
worth up to $f.o() a pattern.
One lot of white and black
Flouncins reduced to $5.60. A
pattern some pvio'ls i" t'1'8 lt for
merly sold at S 10.00 a pattern.
All our patteriis contain 4 yds
of material.
F ALL
CONVLNCEIl
5c
SAJLE