The Plattsmouth daily herald. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1883-19??, May 08, 1889, Image 2

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    THE DAILY HERALD i'l'LArtSMOtJTtt, NEihiASUA, WJEtJftfKiSDAT, ttA2.S,183&
The Plattsnjouth Daily Herai3.i Tin: IiOGUS XOBLEMEX.
I! N O T T S S.,
Publishers & Proprietors.
THK I'LATTSMOUTH HKitLl
I published everv even'ng except Sunday
ami Weekly every Thursday uioriiiug. Uejjis
tcrcd at th postoRlce, I'.attfinoioli, Nebr.. i.n
Hf-oiicl-c-l in matter. OHIire corner of Vine and
filth street. Telephone No. 3.
TKRMS FOR IMILY.
One cony nni jt-ar In advance, by mail.. -.$6 00
One copy per month, ly ran icr 60
One copy per week, by carrier............. 13
TERMS run WEKKLV.
On oopy one year, in advance .....SI SO
One copy six itiomnt. in advance 75
It IN DISK TWINF.
A correspondent writes: "Somebody
oujiht to take the kink out of the binder
twine question. If it is nut pioperly
ventilated there will bo those who will
ma the twine rise for a free trade hobby."
When twine lmidinj; harvesters were
first introduceel, all the twine used upon
them rras made from flax aud hemp,
mostly grown in the United States.
For many years previous, trade had
been so nearly free in manilla and si.sal
(hemp), ttiat these fibers had nearly ex
tinguished the growth of American hemp
and when the large demand for the har
vest field came prices quickly advanced.
Farmers would not have been compelled
to pay 25 cents a pound for hemp binder
twine, in 1880, if American hemp culture
Lad previously been adequately protect
ed aud developed.
When it became apparent that thj
demand could not be supplied by the
few t Aine mills in the country it was
ascertained, on trial, that a manilla rope
yarn (a single strand of manilla rope)
would work as well upon a grain binder
as a 3 or 4 ply hemp twine, and could be
supplied at 13 cents or 14 cents a pound.
As a matter of course hemp twine at 25
cents a pound y.ii immediately condemn
ed as worthless, and all contracts there
for were voided.
The demand for binder twine has now
reached. 40.000 tons per year, manilla
and sisal twine (rope yarn) have been
given the preferance over Jienip twine,
and the steadily increasing demand for
ttiese fibers has resulted in higher prices.
Manilla being produced in the Philip
pine Islan ls, with an area of only 150,
000 square miles, and sisal bt-jaj the pro
luctof Yucatan, Mexico, with aa area of
58,7 IS square milts, while all the world
require these cheap fibres for rope end
cordage, as well as for biudlng twine, it
is not strange that the price Las nearly
doubled. Hemp twine can now be mafic
is cheap as manilla and sisal twlaj.
It will be seen, from the foregoing,
that farmers may practically make their
own price for binder twine. If they wiil
have manilla and sisal twine, and nothirg
else, they will be sure to pay dearly fir
it. If they will encourage the production
of domestic hemp, and produce it on
their own farm?, and hive it spun in
neighboring nills, they ara sure to get
good binder twina at a reuonaMe price.
The duty on manilla and sisal has bf;n:
$25 per ton (about 1 cent a pound) for
rany years, and the duty had absolutely
nothing whatever to do with the recent
advance from S cents to 14 cents er
pound. The only way to obtain manilla
cheaper in the future is to substitute
other fibers in its place, ami thereby les
sen the demand. A few men, a single
company, or even an individual can now j
corner the manilla and sisal markets; tut
if hemp is proeluccd, in this country and
elsewhere, to take the place of these
fibers, corners are less easily effected.
It will not elo to say that these libns
re indfcpensible because of their indii
tructibility. The world moved en almost
6000 years using rope, cordage and twine
made from flax and hemp before manilla
or sisal cams into use. American
Economist.
The restoration of Hon. W. H. V
Clayton to the office of United States At
torney for the Western District of Ar
kansas, from which he was removed by
President Cleveland, will be heartily in
dorsed by the republicans of that state;
and it is to be hopeel that the democrats
will permit him to serve, instead of kill
ing him as they did his brother.
Senator Ixoalls agrees with several
other republicans in the opinion that a
special session of congress will be call- d
earlr in October. Such action is clesir i
Me, it is held, for the purpose of orgnr -izing
the house in good season, ai d
otherwise promoting the interests of the
country, as the democrats were never
known to do when they had control of
the work of legislation.
Da NotTMnk for a Moment.
thai catarrh will in time wear out. The
theory is false. Men try to believe it
because it would be pleasant if
true, but it is not, ad all know. Do not
let an acute attack of cold in the head
remain unsubdued. It is liable to de
velop into catarrh. You can rid your
self of the cold and avoid all chance of
catarrh by using Dr. Sage's Catarrh Hem
edy: If already afflicted rid yourself of
this tjoublesome disease speedily by the
same means. At til druggists.
A SIMPLE METHOD OF UNMASKING
THE PRETENDERS.
Counts That Are of tio Account Barons
Who Are Uurreo of All Honor Mar
qnliMMi Without m. Mark of Distinction.
Americans Kasily Taken In.
On any fino day you can boo a dozen
fraudulent noblemen airing themselves
on upper Uroadway.
A boerua baron, a counterfeit count, a
miscalled marquis, should never impose
on anybody.
How can they be detected?
Easily enough. Suppose you have a
nobleman presented to you; the intro
ducer should bo ablo to vouch for him if
the matter of titlo is a point in question.
But j-our bogus nobleman nearly al
ways presents himself. Then go to the
consulate of hia country.
A SCRE DETECTOR,
Thero it is easy to satisfy yourself of
his identity. Generally speaking, al
though not always, real noblemen regis
ter at tho consulate on their arrival in
New York, but every consulate, even if
tho gentleman has not recorded there, is
more or less able to give information as
to noblemen belonging to their country.
Thanks to tho English Peerago (Burke's
and Debrett's) and the German Gotha
ische, Grafen and Freiherrn Calendar, ns
well as to tho army lists of both coun
tries, it i3 pretty easy to get at the facts.
And thero are so many real noblemen
and officers of the German and English
armies hero In this city that the bogus
article could easily be detected by being
confronted with the real one.
The impostor is generally good looking
and distingue and has a dangerous
knowledge of what he is talking about,
depending on his good looks and his
cheek to cany him through. And our
ricli girls, blinded by what they believe
to lo the honor of being courted by a
real live lord or count, fall an easy vic
tim to the unscrupulous fortune hunter.
Counterfeit noblemen and real noble
men, who have so far forgotten what is
elue to their name that they closely re
semble tho bad article, abound and al
wavs will al)Ound in a great cosmopol
itan city liko New York. As long as the
present inordinate love for titles exists
in this enlightened republic, people must
not bo astonished if they are the dupes
of such as have a smattering of educa
tion anel the cheek to call themselves by
a high sounding title.
All these counterfeit noblemen have
one characteristic that is, on all possi
ble occasions they will brag of their noble
descent and will tell the most wonderful
stories of their doings at homo and of the
eloings of their ancestors generations be
fore them.
The latest specimen who has been an
noying various families, particularly that
of Mr. William Stein way, represent eu
himself as a nephew of the latter, called
himself at various times Count Bonin,
Count von Arnim, Baron Fedwitz and
rorious other names. What his real in
tentions wpra have not been found out as
yet. Inspector Byrnes of the metropol
itan police has nipped his career in the
bud.
SPECIMENS OP THE SPUMOUS.
A peculiar and rather amusing case
ov.co came under the notice of the writer,
himself for long years an pfilcer in the
Prussian service. Ho used to lunch reg
ularly at a down town restaurant, when
one day ho was told by the proprietor
that ho had an ex-ofScer, who was down
on Ids luck, as waiter.
The said waiter claimed to be a Count
X , and said that he was a first lieu
tenant in a crack cavalry regiment of
the Guards. Tho writewas rather curi
ous to see tho waiter, as he had person
ally known Count X . ne was rather
sl.vplical as to the waiter's identity, see
in:; that ho told wonderful stories of hi3
prowess during tho Franco -German war,
tlu count in reality having entered the
arr.iy only after tho closo of the cam.
paigu. At last tho waiter mado his appear
anee, and after having been taken to
tas!: he acknowledged that he was not
tho count, but was once the count's 6er
vvsit. The latter fact accounted for his
intimate knowledgeof the count's family
ailalrs.
Many are the cases where American
wi -c3 have married bogus noblemen and
suITered bitterly for it afterward, simply
because they did not take the trouble to
mate inquiries, but believed everything
the smooth tongued rascals said.
The writer was talking on Fifth avenue
with a gentleman, when tho name of a
marquis well known in New York was
mentioned. On asking what national
ity tho marquis was, ho received as
answer:
"Oh, he i3 not really a marquj3, only
wo all call him so."
The most dangerous are the Italian,
Spanish and French marquises and other
noblemen, as titles of nobility exist in
those countries to such an extent that
they are really difficult to classify.
All this makes it very hard for such
noblemen who como here to gain a foot
ing in good society, as people have been
no often duped by tho spurious article
that when an authentic man comes ho is
apt to bo looked on with a dubious pye.
If tho consulates here are not able to
give information, it is easy enough to
write to the American consuls in Lon
don, Berlin, or whatever country the
claimant of tho title comes from, to re
ceive authentic information.
But as long as tho inordinate craving
of Americans exists for titles, bo long
will tho American store keeper and
tailor, cs well as the American heiress,
fall an easy victim to the foreign adven
turer who comes with a big sounding
title. Tho more names and the longer
tho title tho better. New York Journal.
Mrs. Stations' Shoes.
"People think that I actually wear
Urs. Siddons' 6hoes," said Mrs. Ellen
Terry, "but of course I don't. ( I cherish
tlicm much too dearly for- that, and only
to think they were on the dear, dead
lady's feet. A present from one actress
tounother. Hero are the shoes, which
nra made of silver satin, bound and
trimmed with red silk, adorned with gilt
spangles and gold embroidery."
U-sailiSat
"A great ileal has been done," saiel an
old sailor tho other day, "to improve the
lot of the men beforo tho mast, 6ince first
I vcnt to se-a s a cabin boy, and when
ever a complaint is properly lodged
against a cruel ofiicer, 1 must say it is
fairly investigated. Yet for all that,
thero are plenty f murders committed
today on tho high seas that are never in
vestigated because no complaint is made.
Every day ono or two vessels come into
this port with a shorter crew than they
btarted out with and their captains' re
ports of 'seaman fell overboard and was
lost,' or 'cabin boy killed by falling spar,,
or 'coal passer died from heart trouble
and was buried at sea, are accepted as
perfectly satisfactory. No investigation
is made into the death, unless some one
lodges a formal complaint.
"It's an easy matter for one man who
has a grudge against his mate to shove
the other overboard, if they are both up
in the rigging in a dark and stormy
night. Tho unseen cutting of a ropo is
often' enough to do it. It is e?asy to drop
a block or a marline spike on the heid of
a man below, that will knock him dazed
into the water to drown, or down to the
de-ck to smash his skull. 'Heart trouble'
covers a great deal of insufficient nour
ishment, lack of medicine and overwork.
This is not the way things are done on
land. You have your coroners here to
investigate sudden deaths, why should
they not look into deaths at sea? Many
poor cowards would tell the truth against
their officers, if they were thus forced to
do so, who would not dare come forward
and lodge a complaint they might be un
able fully to prove." New York Tribune.
The Head of the Army.
Gen. Schofield's salary is 13,000. Al
though ho is tho successor of Sheridan,
who followed a line of soldiers in the of
fice who were national heroes, and al
though he is rightfully the incumbent by
reason of his services to the country, his
career has not been such as to make his
name over familiar to people generally.
Flis military life has been long and the
duties faithfully performed, but in few
events has he been very conspicuous.
Gen. Schofield was born on the 20th of
September, 1S31. Ho gratluated from
the United States Military academy in
1853. in tho 6amo class with Sheridan,
McPherson and Hood. Before the war
he left the service to become a professoi
of natural science in a university, but at
tho breaking out of hostilities ho entered
the army as a volunteer. A ma jor'f com
mission was tendered to him at once and
on Nov. 21, 18G1, he had reached the grade
of brigadier general. He served all
through tho war, notably in the Atlanta
campaign, and for a, timo was, secretary
of war in Grant's first cabinet. At presr
ent his duties are practically nominal, for
there are plenty of subordinates to look
after eletails. He ha3 an office in th de
partment building which is principally
interesting for the relics which it contains
of his servjeo. Sheridan filled up his pf
fico in a similar way, and it was a favor
ite spot for sightseers. Louisville Courier-Journal.
The Cottonwood Tree.
It was not many years ago that the
Cottonwood tree was considereej useless
for the purposes of lumber. Today It is
crowding white pine out of the market
for certain purposes, and largo fortunes
are being mado all along the Mississippi
river out of this wood, which was wet
despised as mucl, in that fifcl.las agaj
always has been among fishermen. In
New Orleans white pine Js worth ?;5
a thousand, xvulle yellow cottomv.
brings G5. For the ceiling of grain
barges it i3 invaluable, as grain cannot
sweat in it. Every cracker box in use in
this city today is mado of cotton wood,
and ft cannof bo pxpelled for fruit bar
rels. I do not know why this is so, but
it is a fact, nevertheless. Cottonwood
will, hold nails and can Ihj used for build
ing, anel it is also capable of a fine polish
after certain treatment, and it is much
priced for interior elecorations. There
are now men rich because they own
tracts covered with cotton wood, who five
years ago would have traded an aero of
it for a yellow dog. SU Louis Globe
Democrat.
When We Were Hoys.
Speaking of "mibs," who has not in
dulged in that fascinating gamo at some
stage of his youthful career? Every
man has had "in his time his favorite
"shooter" either an agate, an alley, or,
perchance, a cornelian and he has had
a bag of marbles. Ho has been able to
make a good ring on soft dirt with the
sharp edge of his boot heel, anel he has
often ecoopee holes in the ground for
"ho'ey-boley." tie has practiced lagging
at the ring for his shot, and he never
forgot tho order of that shot. If he were
a 6mart boy he put the kibosh on his
better playmates by calling: "Fen picks
an' fen everythings allaroun' the game!"
Often he has recklessly played 'Schineya
for keeps," and even now he cannot
pass a crowd of boys playing marbles
without involuntarily pausing to see
what the next boy did on his shot
Marbles was and still is a great game,
especially when played "for keeps."
Chicago Heialeh
Cone to Ruin.
Sherman Island was one of the first
islands reclaimed and a few years ago
was a perfe-ct garden 6pot. In 1873 the
island, which is of a peaty formation,
caught fire and burned for months. The
smoko was so dense that vessels found
difficulty in navigating both the Sacra
mento and San Joaquin rivers. It burned
out in some places to a depth of fifteen
and twenty feet, and the island today is
entirely submerged. No one lives upon
it at all except a few fishermen, whose
floating houses are tied upon what was
once a levee. The town of Emmatown
Is no more. The residences are aban
doned, the wharf and warehouses dilapi
dated and unused, while the water stands
up to the windows in the school house.
It is a scene of desolation. Sacramento
llecord-Unku.
TELEPHONE EXCHANGE.
84.
85.
G5.
20.
45.
4.
71.
88.
87.
71.
8.
30.
18.
GO.
51.
GI.
22.
13.
25.
G8.
5.
20.
74.
82.
70.
31.
10.
;;.
101.
25.
GO.
73.
eo.
24.
91.
78.
')0
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28.
81.
3-.
38.
41.
!)0.
Gl.
U(j.
07.
44.
9(5.
4.
40.
80.
67.
G.
GO.
14.
50.
40.
50.
8.';.
33.
73.
3.
2G.
72.
GO.
5:.
15.
I t.
54.
100.
30.
kl.
5d.
27.
93.
75.
1G.
61.
11.
13.
25.
42.
23.
7G.
57.
10.
40.
10.
G4.
00.
32.
20
23. S5.
33.
8.
47.
6.
7.
43.
4.
Biuhl Jos.
Bank of Cuss county.
Bee-son, A. its.
" " office.
Bennett. L. I), store.
res.
Bonner stables.
Brown, W. L. otlice.
res.
Ballou, O. II. res.
office.
B. & M. tel. office.
B. & M. round house.
Blake, John saloon.
Bach, A. grocery.
Campbell, D. A. ns.
Chapman, S. M. res.
City hotel.
Clark, T. coal office,
Clerk district court.
Connor, J. A. res.
County Clerks office.
Covell, Polk & Beeson, oflice.
Cox, J. IJ, res.
Craig, J. M. res.
Critch field. Bird res.
Cummins & Son, lumberyard.
J. C. farm.
Cook, Dr. office.
Clark, A. grocery store.
Clark, Byron office.
Cummins, Dr. Ed., office.
District court office.
Dovey & Sou, store.
Dovey, Mrs. George res.
Emmons, J. II. Dr. office and res.
First National brink.
Fricke, F. G. & Co., elrug store.
Gleason, John res.
Goos hotel
Gering, II. drugstore.
" res.
Haelley, elray aud express.
Hkhai.i) t'jee.
Holmes, C M., res.
Hutt fc Co., meat market.
IK'iuple .v Troop, store.
Hal!, Dr. J. II., office.
res.
Holmes, C. M., livery stable,
?faU $ Ouig, agricultural imp.
Jones, W. D., stable.
Journal office.
Johnson Bros., harelware store.
Johnson, Mrs. J. F., millinery.
John3on, H. P-., res.
Klein, Joseph, res.
Kraus, P., fruited confectionery
T-'.Yl.igston, Dr. T. P., office.
Livingston, res.
Livingston, Dr. li. P,., oiae.
iUauager Waterman Opera House.
McCouit, F., store.
McMaken, II. C, res.
Murphy, M. B., store.
Murphy, M. B., res.
McMaken, ice office.
Minor, J. L., res.
Mcyoy, galoua,
Moore,L.A., res. and floral garden
Neville, Win., res.
Olliver & Kamges. meat market
Olliver & Kamge slaughter house.
Pub. Tel. Station.
Palmer , H. E. re?
Petersen Bros., meatmarket.
Petersen, R, re-s.
Polk, M. D., res.
Patterson, J. M., res.
Riddle ho'ise.
Ititchie, Harry.
Schilelknccht, Dr. office.
Sliipman, Dr. A. office.
' is r.ei.
Sho waiter, W, C. office.
Siggins, Dr. E. L. res.
. nice.
Streight, O. M. stable.
Smith, O. P. drug store.
Skinner & Ritchie, abstract; a;:d
Joan Pilicc,
Sherman, C. V. office.
TodeT, Ammi res.
Troop & Ilemple, store.
Thomas. J. W. Summit Garden.
Water Works, office.
Water works, pump house.
Waugh, S. res.
Weber, Wm. saloon.
Weckbach & Co., store.
Weckbach. J. V., res.
Western Union Telegraph office,
White. F. E., res.
Windham, R. B., office.
Windham & Davies, law office.
Wise, Will, res,
Withers, Dr. A. T.. res.
Young, J. P., store.
S. Buzzell, Manager. '
TRIO LODGE NO. 84. A. O. V. W. Meet
every alrernat Friday evening at K. ej 1.
hall. Transient brothers r.re respectfully in
V td toatfend. K P. Brown. Waster work
man ;f B. Kinster, Foreman ; F. H.Steimker
Overseer; W. H. Millar, Financier; . F.
Houseworth, Kecorder ; F. J Morgan, Keceiv
er ; Wm. Crehan. Guile ; Wm. Ludwijj, Inside
tVatch : L. Olsen, Outside Watcii.
Mt, ZION COMMANDARW NO. 5, K. T.
Meets first and third Wednesday night of
each month at Mason's ball. Visiting Uro there
are cordially invited tQ meet with u.
Wm. Haid, Kec. F. E. White. E. C.
McCONIHIE POST 45 G. A. R.
BOSl'KH.
M. A. Dickox '"ommander.
Ben.i. IIfmpI;c....,, Senior Vice "
S. CAKKiiiAM.. Junior ' "
-. Nil ks ' Adjutant,
A. Shipmax Siirg.
IUcxkv Stkkight Q, M.
A. Tarsch , officer of the Day.
Jamks IIicksox " inard
Sergt Major.
Andkrkos C. Fky.. ..Quarter Master Serrt.
L. V,. Ocrtib Post Ghaplaiu
eellDir Saturday evening
PL, ATTS MOUTH BOARD OF TRADE
President Kobt. B Windham
1st Vice President A. B. Todd
2nc Vice President Win Neville
Secretary F. Hew-mann
Treasurer F. R. Gutliiuan
DIRElTORS.
T rt T:Y,at T.- 17 U'hita I C PnttaMAfi
J. A. Conner, B. Elion, C. W. Sherman, F. Oor-
n-r. J. V. weckoacn.
Iseat littli bracelets are formed of
small circles of nugget finish goltl. jir.ke4
together, with a pear) in the center of
ca.'Ji.
8 "7 tf ( A MONTH can be made
I O l' 0-J" wonting lor us. Agents
r. referred who can furnish a horse and gtre
heir whole time to the business. Spare mom
ent-mayheproBtaf-.lv employed aa. A f ef
vanancles la t'v is ni,d cili-s. B- F.JOHN.
M;S (jO..Vif.9Min-st.. Uifihmond, Va.
JV. U. F'cae- utate a(je and buxiuets exper
ience. JVertr mind about aenditio stamp for re
ply. B. F. J. Co.
1M
FUR
HAS THE LARGEST AND FINEST STOCK OF
NiTOBE,
TINWAEE
HOUSEHOLD GOODS.
In the city, which he is offering at Prices that will make them sell.
A complete line o'i Window Curtains at a sacrifice. Picture
Frames in great variety. Von can get everything you need
Vou can buy it on the installment plan, pay so much each
month and you will foon have a line luniished house
and hardly realize the cost. Call and ee.
Z. E DS .A. 25 Xj 2v 3iT,
SIXTH STREET, BET. MAIN AND VINE. FLAT TSMOU Til, NEP,
T
PLATTSMOUTH HERALD
rpiRirisrTS
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POLITICAL AND SOCIAL, FO
CENTS PER WEEK.
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Tubscribe For It
Tins Daily and Weekly Hicrald is the hwt Ad vcrti.iing Medium in Cass county,
because it reaches the largest iiuml cr of people. Advertising rate
made known on application. If you have property to
rent or sell it will he to your interest to ad
vertise in the Hkkald.
Is! Willi TMH !TTLT.
Ad
verttss
hp
Co
minced
THE CITIZENS
B -fi&L. KT !
PLATTSMOUTH. - NEBRASKA.
Bank of Cass County
CAPITAL ST0 K PAID IN, - $50,000
Authorized Capital, $100,000.
PlattemeutU.
$50.00ff
Z5,00
OFFICERS
.'KANK CAU&UTII. JOS. A. CONNOR,
Pra.siisnt. VUe-J'reslJeut
W. H. CUSIJIN'. Cahier.
DIRECTORS
Frank Carrutu J. A. Connor, F. K. Guthiiiaun
J. W. Johnson. Ilenry Boeck, John O'lteefe,
V. 1. Merriani, Wra. Wetccainp. W.
U. Cuslung.
Transacts a General Banking Business. Al
who have any Banking business to transact
are invited to call. No matter h
larre or small the transaction, it
will receive our careful attention,
aud we promise alvraya cour-
teoaa treatment.
Issues Certificates ot Deposits bearing interest
Buys and sells Foreign Exchange, County
and Cltv securities.
FIRST NATIONAL.
OF PLATTSMOUTH. NEBRASKA,
Offers the very test taciiitlM tor the prompt
transaction of legitimate
BANKING BUSINESS.
stocks, Bonds, Gold, Government acd Inctl
Securities Boui;h t and Sold , Deposit reoel7-
ed and interest allowed oa time Osrtia
cates. Drafts drawn, available iu any
part of the United .States and ail
the principal towns of
Eurooe.
Collections made & promptly retr.ittefi
Highest market prices paid ter County War
State ai.d Count ? Bocds.
DIRECTORS I
John Fttreerild
John R. Clark,
s. w amen.
JCBX KITMrBALLI,
President.
D. Tlaksworth
t. F. White.
8- WAt'Oo
Caahirr.
Cor. Main and Fifth Sts.,
PMDUP CAPITAL.
SURPLUS
OFFICERS
C. IT. Parmf.i.f.
Kkk.u Ookdkk
J. M. Pattkkson-..
JA.S. fATI'EKSO.V.JH ,
DIRECTORS
C. II. Parmple. .1. M. I'atterso
.H. Muitli, li. 1J. Windlialii
Jits. Patteisou Jr.
A General Banting Business Traasactei
Accounts Solicited. Interest allowed on tlin
deposits, an. I i.roiuj.t .ttentioa given to all
business entrusted to its care.
Tresiden
Vice President
Cashier
Ass't Cashier
1, r red Gorder.
IS. S. Ramsey,
BUS I ESS 1)1 RECTORY.
A TTOIISE Y ? ' "
... 8. F. TU"MAS.
Attorne- -at-Law and Nnl.iry Public. OtHee In
Fl:zgera d Block. Plattunouth. Heb.
ATTOKNLY. " " "
A A. X. BTTLLIVAN,
to all burinex intrusted to biro. Oflice lm
Union Block. East side. PlatU.moUh. SeS.
flUOCEKIES. .' "
, CHRI8. WOHLFARTH.
Staple and Fancy Groceries. Glasswarw an
Crockery. Flour and Feed. BC
K. DRESSLEH.
The 5th St. Herchant Tailor
K6jsa FullUneoI
Foreign & Domestic Goods.
Consult Your Intero-t bv Giving Htm a Cal
SHERWOOD BLOCK
OPPICE. -taayS.lk6Qtltt
to,U1 BulueB Entrust-
KOTARY IX OKFIVB.
Titles Examined. Abstarcts rtmnttsi r
surauce Written, Real Kstatfc"ld. '
Better Facilities for makins Farm Loans tteaa
Any Otlier Aqchoj.
riattsinoutb, - 2b'c1rack
v