The Plattsmouth daily herald. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1883-19??, February 28, 1889, Image 1

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SECOND VI3AK
I'LATTSSIOUTU, NEUKASKA, THUKSDAY KVKNIXG, FEBRUARY 28, 1881).
NUMBER 143
f I I III X. X
1
f ROYAL WS'JJ? Jk
Absolutely Pure.
This ioviIt never varies. A marvel of pur
ity, strength hii1 w lioleoiiienes. More econo
mical tu an th ordinary kinUx, and cannot be
sold in rointoitiMi itti the iniillltiide of low
ttl. shtrt welirlit alum or plio-pliate powders.
Uttld tmlij in eniut. KnVAL lt.AKI.su I'owukh
Co.. lo Wjill at. N. V.
GIT'Y OFFICIOS.
Mayor.
Clerk.
Treasurer, -Attorney,
Kui'tne-r.
PoUcb .1 Jde,
F.M. KlCHKY
W K Fox
JAM ltd FATTF.KSON. JH.
- 11YUON CLAUK
- A Madolk
. H Cl.lFFOtiD
UKOlMiK I'uISALL.
Alarnal,
PAnnnl!man l.r ... w.l I J V V
i J V WKI'KRACU
' 1 A SALISBURY
2nd
t 1 M JONK.S
I I K. A HHIPMAH
1MB MUKI'HV
1 S W IJOTTOJf
COS O'CONNOR.
1 f McCallkn. Frks
3rd
4th.
V 1 J W JOHNS IN.CUAIll.Mi
AN
Board Fub.Works-c fur.it ;okik.r
j L 11 llAWKSWl
IWOBTB
GOLJSTYOFFIGlilS.
Treasurer. - - I. A. Campbell
Deouiv Treasurer. - - Tiio-i. Politick
Cleric. - - HIKD Cujtciiuklo
DeDUtv Clerk.
EXA CRirCH FIELD
Kecorder ot Deeds -Deputy
Keoitrder
Clerk o( District Co jrt,
Sherlir,
Surveyor. -Attorney.
8upU of Pub Schools,
County J udice.
W. II. Pool
John M Lkvda
w. SllOWALTKK
J. C. ElKH.NHAKl
A, Madolk
- ALLKH llKESON
MAVNAHl) SfINK
C. Kusssll
BOAKD or 8CPF.KVISOK8.
A. B. Todd. C'h'm., - - Hattsmoutli
Louis Koltz, - Weeping Vter
A. B. Ui ksos, - K.mwood
GIVIG SOGIliIiS.
(As5WlT)7(T No. 116. 1 O. O. F. -Meets
every Tuesday evening of each week. All
transient tretlicrs are respectfully invited to
attend. .
IJLATTMOUni ENCAMPMENT No. 3. 1. O.
O. P.. meets every alternate Friday in
each month iu ih Maconic Hall. Visiting
Brothers aro i ivlted to attend.
T
KIO UOi!iE NO. 81. A. O. V. W. Meets
everv al'.f rnal Friday eveuiun at tC. of P.
all. Transient brother are respectfully In
cited to al lend. K. P. Brown, Master work
man :i B. K nisrer, K-re'iian ; v. ll.Steimker
Overseer; VV. H. M ll-r. Financier; i. K.
liouseworih. Keci;rder ; F. J Morgan. Receiv
er; win Creiiaii. iui 'e : Wni. Lu-Jwiir, luside
atch : L. 1cii, ursiile VatC'.
4 'ASH OVMP NO. 3.1 -, MOlJK'iN VVOOI1MHN
vv of At erica Meets second and fourtii Mon
day evening at K. of P. hail All transient
brother are reiitistfi to meet with us. I.. A,
Noweo iier. Ve.ier tMe Ctms.il ; '.1. ", Nile'
Worthy dvi-.er; S C. Wilde, Banker ; W. A.
Baeck, Clerk.
ti tts.uou i n uipuk x x. a. o. u. w.
Meet everv jilfer-iate. Fiiilay evening at
KickwiwdhaliatR j'fl.wK, Ail transient brotli
ers are re;ectfui'y i-nited io attend. Is. t.
Larson. M. W. ; F. linMl. Foreman: S. V.
Wilde. iioctrdr : i:d Anders a. overseer.
ilLATf-MoCTrf :,-tJK NO. 6. A. V.Sc A.M.
t'l- SH.-t anil tniri .nonnays oi
.ill. All transient urot:-
ern are c;f 4Ut;y Mi . hd to i with hj.
J. tJ. llIOSIEY. VM
Wa. 11A73. S-j
'KUK.vsK.v CjI ;'fi:it. .v. a, u. a. m
I l.-i sec ml ::t I furt;! Tu-siliv of ea-1:
i .n .inii Tr:iis.?i nt bro.her
llivi.i u .. - -
are tirr;i.?d t i uet wuh us.
F. K. WillTK, II. P
WM.'llv'- Secret -iry.
AT r- Z!ON cnl iA lltV. .NO. 5 .
Jijl-.-n Hr.-t and lii'ld -V eitm s 1 ijr nitf 111
each i'n:;i a! .l ,401'sii.dl. isn i briner
aie cordially i:-vil.-d to meet wiili tis.
KM. 11 ays. live. F. K. Win l it. E. V.
USU COUNCIL. NO V21, KOVAL nOANUM
V meets the second and fourth Mondays ot
t&oh iii nth at Arcanum Hall.
K. N. Ulenk, Regent.
P. C. Misob. Secretary.
PLATTSMOUTH BOARD OFTR ADE
President Kobt. B Windham
1st Vice President -A. B. rodil
2nd Vice Fresid-ut m Neville
Sewtarv F- Herrmann
Trearer.'..: F. R. Guthman
J. C. Richev. F. K.' While", J C. Peterson,
J A- Conner. . Klson.C. W. Sheruian, F. Oor
der, J. V. neckbach.
fdST 43 C. A. R.
Kosrea.
M. A. Dicksox ..Commander.
Bn. HrMPLK Senior Vice
8.CABKIOA.V Junior -
Ho. niles A aj utant.
A. Shipmax , ,
H2HKY STKKtGUf - - ""'V-
a Ti rsoh officer of the Iay.
Jamwi HKKso.s. ........ 8ergt Major
ASDFRHOX r'. FRY.. ..guarter Master Serjrt.
t: V. Cuktis Chplain
f;erlni Saturday vj:ing
Q. F. SMITH,
The Bgss Tailor
Mijfl St 0er Mcrge! Shoe Store.
Has the best and most coqinjetc stQPk
of sample 6tU fowigu ancl domestic
woolens that ever camo west of Missouri
river. Note these prices: Business suits
from $10 to $35, dress suits, $25 to $45,
pants $4, $5, $6, $6.50 and upwards.
fJpWill guaranteed a fit.
Prices Defy Comoetitipn,
7
r TERKlHIili WRIiCK
A Pasaencfer Train Falls Through a Bridga
Near St. George,. Ontario
DEAD AND DYING HUMANITY
A List of the Killed and Injurd- The
Inaugural March of 1841 An
American Bridge 8u It
er's Sad Fate.
An Appalling Disaster.
St. George, Out., Feb. 27.- Tlie St.
Louis express passing here eastbound,
about C o'clock this evening, went
through the bridge just east of the sta
tion. A. broken tire on the engine wheel
caused the rails to spreak, and the first
passenger car, Pullman car and diniog
car went through the middle section of
the bridtre. The Pullman car which con
tained most of the passengers, was thrown
clean off the bridge, turning completely
over and landing right up.
The dining car stands on end against a
pier. The passenger car remains on the
bridge, having stripped the ties ahead of
it. Eight or ten persons who were killed
and about thirty wounded were taken
out of the cars.
. The dining-rooin car contained about
even persons besides the waiters. Sup
per had just commenced, and fn a few
minutes the car would have been filled,
and must haye perished.
The following is a list of killed:
George Teggat, of Mitchell; William
vVemp, of London; Dr. Swan and A. W.
Francis, of Woodstock; Mr. McLean, of
the firm of McLean & Beecher, of Detroit;
Mr. Baines, of Hamilton; Captain Moore,
of Bradford; Mr. Peers, of Woodstock.
The following are more or less seriously
injured: Thomas L. Doutly, temperance
lecturer; Mrs. Jennings and May Jennings,
of Paris; Mr. and Mrs. Buddin, of Dor
ohester; Miss Higgins, of Toronto; Mrs.
McLeod, of Ingersoll; Miss Chaffee, of
Pontiac, Mich.; James Hj6lof, of Good
rich; Dan Peacock and R. W. Knight, of
Woodstockj John McKinley, of Detroit;
Fred Flancock. London; George Forbes,
of New York; J. R. Marshall and Mrs. J.
R, Marshall, of Regina; John IT. Wilson,
colored; of Chatham; Mrs. Evans, of
Hamilton; George Margetts, dining car
conductor, of Niagara; Robert Hilton, of
St. Catharines; Mr. McLauchlan, of Lon
don; Conductor Wenell, D. W. Kain, of
Woodstock; Wni. Beunett, of Sanilas.
Mich.; Dr. IL Lequesue, of Cleveland,
Ohio; A. W. Francis, of Woodstock, and
Mrs. A. S. Kendall, of Detroit.
St. George, near where the accident
occurred, is on the Great Western branch
of the Grand Trunk.
Trits Same March.
Washington, Feb. 28. Memories of
William Heury Harrison will be plentiful
at the inauguration of his grandson. The
inaugural committee has received a letter
from a lady at Sykesville, M L, request
ing that the iuaugural gran 1 inarch,
composed by Miss. Susanna W!irfield and
played by the Marine band during the
inauguration ceremony of William Henry
Harrison in 1841 be ag iin played during
the ceremonies next week. Miss Waifiel.l
is n w a lady ninety-rive years old ami
would be Irighly gratified to know that
the music c m posed by lu-r in li-.mor tti
the first Harrison w is heard also in t!i
inaugural ceremonies of his grandson.
A copy of- Mjss WF(ie!d's. inr.reh was
sent recently to Mrs. Harrison at Indian
apolis and it is understood she wrote to
the committee here requesting that it be
played Monday next.
Plenty of lumber has been used in pre
paring for the inauguration, but the only
thing that has yet taken shape is a log
cabin. It was put up today in front of
the Peace monument at the head of
Pennsylvania avenue. Although Riore
fragile than one in the days of "Tippeca
noe and Tyler too," it looks habitable.
It is about 10x12 feet, and stands just at
the base of the triumphal goddess, about
whom a graceful flag already waves.
This old cabin will be the first thing that
greets the eyes of the troops they
march dqwu the avenue with Gen. liar
rison at ther head, and WAY wl'l be
the cheers that will ring out for William.
Henry Harrison and BJeafyii l.grand
eou. paarful Fate of an Anr3rle,an
Bridge BvAlfter in Australia.
Tpwada, Ta., Feb. 23,- The Union
Bridge compauy took a contract a year
or so ago for building the great Hawkcs
bury bridge at Sidney, New South Wales.
The company sub -let the work to Rylant
& Morse, of this city, Th.o, Ryiand of
the llrm w.-u the well known bridge
builder, S. V. Rylanil. The partners
went to Sydney and completed the work,
receiving for it $1,000,000. ItylamVs
family have received a letter from Morse,
which says that on the day before Christ
mas Rylaud was walking on one of the
string piers of the bridge, when he lost
his balance and fell into the water, a
distance of fifty feet. The fall did not
seem to hurt him, as he was seen to turn
and swim for the shore. On the way he
was attacked by an immense shark, which
carried him beneath the surface, and he
was seen no more. Rylaud leavees a
widow tfud five children in Towauda.
He was forty-eight years of age and one
of the moat prominent citizens of Brad
ford county.
Cullom Correspondence-
Dkaii Editok: Not seeing anything
in your valuable paper for quite a while
in recognition toward Cullom, I thought
to drop you a few items from our little
berg and let your many readers know
whereof we speak.
Cullom is situated in a beautiful valley
on the B. & M., nine miles west of the
county seat of Cass couuty, and is sur
rounded with one among the best farm
ing communities that can be found in
the state.
On inquiry we get the information that
sixty-five car loads of grain have been
shipped from this point since the
beginning of the new year.
There are twe scales here for weighing
grain put in by the fanners and an ele
vator for handling grain is talked of as
a necessity and would undoubtedly pay
any one for their investment.
The ladies of Cullom gave a basket
supper the 10th inst. for the benefit of
the church which was a grand succes.
The schoal house where the supper . was
held was decorated in the most elaborate
style, which does great credit to the
Cullomites. As near as we can learn there
were thirty-one dollars made above all
expenses. Quite a delegation of ladies
and gentlemen from Cedar Creek and
Louisville attended the supper.
The Cullom school is taught by Mr. J.
B. Meisinger, which is in a flourishing
condition.
Services every other Sabbath in the
church, conducted by Rev. Ilawes, a
Methodist mimister of Nebawka.
Mr. J..B. Thomyson, of the firm of
Dovey & Thompson, have a fine lot of
feed steers on their farm.
HoitsriPE.
Horning School District.
W. L. Hull will take possession of the
W. T. Cole farm in a few days.
Benjamin Brunner, who has run the
Perry Walker farm for two years past,
will soon move on a farm near Murray.
It is reported that articles sold well at
the sale of Mrs. Cole's on Tuesday. .
The basket supper at Cottonwood
school given for Mr. Surface's benefit on
Tuesday night was well patronized and
goodly number of the young gents each
captured a basket and the fair owner
thus realized a neat little sum of money.
The literarv society last Thursday eve
adjourned sine die. Such a society is a
great source of pleasure ana gives ample
means for improvement.
There will be a meeting at the Horning
school house"ou Thursday night, March
7, to engage in the discussion of the pro
hibitorv amendment. Everybody i3 jn
vited tq come r.nl t.-lke part in the dis
cussion, If. is a question that Interests
all. Wonld not 'ye edit, y " and your
brother" across tho way come over
and help us?
Mr. Serf ace. of the U. B. church, wh
has been working on this circuit for two
rears, will occupy anoth'.-r ti Id thn com
ing yar.
FMjS CfARIi.
Tlio I'ies.1 Wouitu cf V.c ruture.
'--Tlio ideal v.'oir:n:i cf the future,"
a3"s aii eminent physician, "niv.fct be
Pi voman of grand aad etrong phy
sique, Bujwe gars: Tho rnntch for
beauty U a man, not a money chest'
Equally true is it that the match for
the ideal man, the coming Twentieth
century man, is a woman, not a bundle
of aches and pains. And woman will
not havo gone far in her search for
health before she will havo discovered
that her dress is a fetter self imposeif,'
which she. herself ' must' Eurnmpa
strength to'breakj
She must cast off Uei slavery to
the fashion plato and go back the
freedom and 'firatci uie old "Greek
ideals ' dnu .nnd in tho deep bosomed
Junos and the stately, well poised Ye
nuses of antiquity, "with their loose
girdles and flowing lines of draperv,
her. models "in dress. " She must be
strong and many sided mentally. All
art, all culture, all those mighty
Erinciples of physical and psychical
w of which an ancient Greek has
said that '(ho divinity is mighty
within them and gTQweth not old'
must minister to her intellectual
wants, for hovt shall she give life "who
jtpows not the principles of life-. Last
and best of all, she must be gi-and in
that freedom and purity of soul which
shall mako her love a royal boon, a
guerdon worthy of all knightly and
chivalrous homage tq tho man who
shall call her wifo'KuladeJphia
Press.
The Weeklt Herap. gent one year
free to, anyone sending us two yearly sub
scribers to the Weeklt Hejlvux
OLD AND CURIOUS COINS.
PIcCGS OF SCARCE KINDS OF MONE
AND THEIR FANCY PRICES.
The Ooddesa ut Liberty lu Different Posi
tion Coins from Anicrlcau Mints That
Are More Prized Thau Those That Were
Current In tli Days of the Cietotrs.
A craze which of late years has greatly
developed and at this time shows no
sin of falling off. i3 that of collecting
raro coin3. Chicago leads all western
cities in the number of its numismatists
and lioaf.ts some fino collections. It
might bv 6iipiH)sed that the demand
would Ik? principally for coins of grea!
antiquity, but this is not tho case. Th
chief inquiry is for sets of American
coins, and some numbers nro so rare as
to readily command fancy prices. In
certain years some descriptions of coins
wcro not minted at all, while in other
cases few copies vrir ter.'vd. Oilier
coins are valued I.x-cuum? of toiue error
or eccentricity in the die; in fact, any
variation from the ordinary types, if in
good condition, will bring more than its
faco value.
ODD SIZES AND DATES.
Of tho 6ilrer dollars, nearly all tho
earlier issues are in demand at a slight
premium, and that of 1794, in which tho
goddess of lilierty is depicted with flow
ing hair, is worth 20. As for tho dollar
of 1804, of which few are known, any
copy in good condition will bring 200.
The flying eaglo of 1S39 and 1839, and
the coins of 1831, 1852 and 1858, with the
lilerty loving lady seated, are worth at
least $15 each. The on timo despised
trade dollars, issued 1879 to 18S3 in
clusive, aro at a premium of 10 cents
each. Of half dollars, those of 1790 and
1797, with fifteen or sixteen Btars, bring
$13 each. Others of value aro dated
1791, 1801 and 1S02, and there are many
more, such as 1833 with a liberty cap,
183$ with an "O" mark under the head,
and a coin of 1S33 with liberty seated,
which are worth from $2 to 3 each.
The scarce quarters are those of 1823
and 1827, with the head to the left, each
valued at 15, while tho 17M3 fillet head
is to be had for and that of 1804 for
1. Twenty cent silver pieces of 1S7G
bring SO cents; those of tho eucceeding
year are cheap at r.50. The dimes of
the grandfathers are mostly worth from
five to twenty times their face value,
while half dimes in silver bring from 50
cents to 3 each, and a ppecial brand of
the vintage of 1802 will command $25.
Silver three cent pieces run from 20 to
50. cents: nickel fives 15 to 30 cent3 each,
and nickel threes 15 to 23.
COPPER LEADS GOLD.
There is a great demand for old copper
cents, tho first ambition of every col
lector being to btart even with the pro
cession in 1793 or bo and bring it down
to dato with a coin for each year. It
will cost him from 1 to 3 for the vari
ous kinds issued in 1793, S3 foi 1799, and
$2.50 for 1S04. With the exception of a
cent of 1309 with the head to tho left the
rest are reasonable in price. Half cents
are in demand, and readily command
from 81 to $5 for those of certain yearo
between J331 and 18-19. But in these it
must liot ie understood that those of all
years are equally in request. Those is
sued 1840-43 inclusive, with the head to
tho left, average about 3 each. Wash
ington medals, old fashioned cents, and
the copper issues of New York, Vermont,
Massachusetts and New Jersey bring,
provided they have the necessary ear-
murks, sums ranging from fi to
Therein not much c? II for gold coins,
but trial pieces uro valuable., and good
proof:': of douL'.e caglrs of some years,
as 1853 and 1S33, bring a i-mul! premium.
Scarce 1::; If c;:gle:; ;;:v V...se of 13! 5 and
1S22, i:-.:d worth full i;i)wdi. On tit her
dates from 17C5 to 1ZZI , 0:113 t i jK-r
cent, prouiiuru U pVj.i. Tfave dollar
gold pio'rpq f? ;75 .-.r.d IS70. v. iili the
Hgiiri -t.f an li:dfon 5 : i::(. i:.s. I rin 3
and 05. respectively. Ci:nricr mlea rf
early d;:lrs run lrt;i;i ' ; ' - '- ttnd
there. ::re iu.-iy pAA d.j.-Isa for- WhivU a
slight a4 vanc ca thpiv faw vxduo ;.iiu,L
bs'paij.
Intendin.? collectors weed not dutrcas
themselves l:i looking for dollars of the
years 1S05-35, Inclusive, for Uncle Sam
was either short cf metal or otherwise
busy thoso thirty years and none vt4e.
coined. There were 1:0 cents, pushed on
tho market in 1813A aiul 110, eagles from
1S03. tq 83,7, inclusive. The Conf;.rate
States mado a di- fov a eilv- dollar and
struck c!T a fcv, bi'reui out of silver.
Art authc0 ccia 0f ttaat j3SUO u-ould
'tug $1,000. As a contrast to this it
may be noted that you can get a penny
of the Caesars for G0 cents. Chicago
Tribune.
A Shrewd Dos.
Of a sedate but cunning dog out in
California this 6tory is told: On one
occasion a rabbit wai started, and all
the dogs with the exception of Bonus
dashed off in full pursuit. We were
astonished to observe that he, foregoing
tho intense excitement of tho chase, de
liberately trotted by a s?iort cut to a
hollow oak trunk, and crouching at its
base calmly awaited the coming of the
fleeing rabbit. And he was not disap
pointed, for the pursuing dogs pressed
the rabbit so hard that after making a
long detour, it approached the place of
refuge. As it was about entering the
hollow trunk. Bonus sprang up and cap
tured it. Now, tliis old dog was used to
hunting rabbits in that 6-dd, and knew
that the rodents were in tho habit of
flying for saf ety ; to tliat hollow tree.
Moreover, tbi3 story is true. Philadel-
i
3
THE
E-PRICE
on
Has left tor the East to buy the Finest, Largest and Cheapest
Stock of
9
So
ring and Summer Clothing
Ever Brought fcto Cass county. Remember JOE will Buy
Than You Ever Saw in Plattsmontli.
LOOK OUT
GRAND SPRING OPENING
-JT 0 IE-
Has not got one dollar's worth of Spring Goods, or old Shelf
Worn Goods. Everything you will see in his store
will be Bran New, of the
LATEST STYLES A1TDPATTEE1TS
At Such Low Prices it "Will Astonish You.
En
lo
WE7A
In order to cut down
oods,
Dry
Notions &c, we are offering Unexcelled Bargains in ihcie Goods.
"Ve have a
mm
And bilk Handkerchiefs at very low figures.
Great Oloalk
In this Department we are
CLOAKSiPLUSH SACQUES
at prices that is sure to sell them. Call and inspect them and .
be convinced that we carry the beit stock in Plattsmontli.
POPULAR
CLOTHIER
FOR JOE'S
JJo
our large stock ot
Underwear,
fine line ot
iOassimere luffiers
Sal
showing all the latest styles of