The Plattsmouth daily herald. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1883-19??, February 27, 1889, Image 1

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second YKAIl
PL.ATTS3IOUTII, NEBRASKA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 27, 1889.
NUMBER 142
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Absolutely Pure.
Th's HiwtIer ik-vt varies. A ninrvel of pur
It, .ttrrrit'tli ami w li'ilciineiies"i. More eeono
mlca.1 tin n tlx' oniiu.iry ktn.1, ami eiiiinnt 1
old in 00111:10: it ion wit it tlx? lunl'itu le r low
test. All rt wt-iuiit ul.ii.i I'lm-'iili.i'e ii.-.vilr-.
Sold until in can. K.-yai. I'aki no I'iiwiiKK
Co., lutf Wiiil at. X. V .
Mayor.
Clerk. -
Treasurer, "
i. F, Mr Tu. iikv
-- - - - v K J Vix
JAMK4 I'ATTKIISO.N.JK.
- livnuN i:uhk
- A M AI)OI
S Cl.l KKOIIO
CtC JKCK I'oI.SAl.L
Attorney,
Kneluet-r.
Police Judge,
Marshall.
CotiQCilmeu, 1st ward.
J V VVf.l KBACH
I A SALlfiKUHY
2cd
3rd
4th.
. I M J ONUS
J lK. A SlllPMAM
. 4MB Muitniv
1 S W lUTTn!
J Con O'Connor.
1 P M.-Cali.kn. 1'kf.s
I J W JOHN n.
Board Pub. Worka-J kiikd ;okif.k
J V JOHNH N,JHAI1MA
OBTH
GOLTjSTY OFiriGliljS.
Treasurer,
Deputy Treasurer, -
Clerk.
Deputy Ch-rk.
Kecor.ler ot Oeeds
Deputy Kei;irler
Clerk o' Lituci Co art.
Sheriff,
Surveyor.
Attorney.
SupUof Pub Sc'aooi.
County Juae.
I. A. CAMPBKI.l.
Tno. I'oi.i.h;k
PrKD ClllTOilKIH.n
EXAL'lillClUK.LI
W. I!. Pool
Join M I.kvda
V. C. SHinVALTKII
J. C. ElKH SBAKJ
A. Madoi.i-
AI.Lii.N l'.KKSi'N
MAVNAKD Sfl.NK
C. Kt'SSCLI-
BOARD OF SO
PERVISOlt.S.
A. B. Todd, OhYu.,
Loui.-i Koltz.
A.. 11. Ul KsuV,
PVitts'noutl
E-mwoou
GIVrG SOGITtTvli.
ASrtToU'Tr N o. i W.Wr "o. . I'-; -Meet".
Vevery T .i"i.iv- evti:iii of e:ieli wi-eK. ah
.transient oi .t u-i are rleetfui!y n.'.iied to
attend. - '.
PLATTM'U'ril i:C MP.MEN r No.S.I.O.
O F., ui.ai every n't.-r.M'e Fr-.hiy ti
each rnont'i 'n ilie M touitr ll:ill. , V isit Uij.
Brothen -.it:' I iv'uo-1 'i attt-nd.
KIOLorUEN. 8i. A. O. V. V. Meets
everv ii'criiii I'ri'i -vfi"iiij :ii i. i i .
all Trnsie-it lir-wli.-r ;i-e re-sjwi-1 1 u.Iy -Tltedtoa:jf....
P. i. I'.mvn. V:isJ,-r xorh
man :J U.K i.-:er. K r-.i:,;. -. V. i.M.-iinkiT
Over-.nr; W. 1. M 1: r. H-.i:uit'r; f.
Housewoiih. Ki i -'M' i : l". J M r- i. U '?-.
er- m rrehHii. ;..!: l.ti
Aatrh : L. i.. .:.! ;it
..ASS CAMP t.j:'..'. M'1?-:hm .ViioiMk
- of AienM .Mi ixefii'u! ii!.:i f.'-.irili !,
lay evei"in at K. of P. h ili .All traTi-seiii
brother are re-incMed to meet w.th u-. i. a.
Newro-.tT. V.N.er:.oie Consul : ' ; Vv'"''
Worthy Adviser ; S C. A tide. Banker ; A
Boeck. Clerk. 2
1LATTSmCIH lOi.X'.K Ni s. A.O. I'. W.
t,i- rvir .i.t-'fi.ite I ri.iiiy -vt;l;i at
KtckwtHl lialiut .! h!. Ail Transit lit lrt
ar are r.jfiful".v i-.v.tr"l o ai'.-ti'i. I..
Larson. I. .: V . '' d. Kt.n-i:.n : s. j
iMe. Kt-e.iru.-r : Looiwul An l-rs i-vd-fr
1I.ATr-Mil: 1 M L'I'E Nt., A. P. .i A.M.
Mt, tl!- f.r-t lii.rl ..o!iia t .-i
each tiiont'i nr -.' t-;ili Ail ts;i -i-:-r,t ui..;t-
J. C. lltrtil-.l. V..I.
ffx. H Sccr.'-nr;.-.
VEBitAsx v ciitiTi:;:- n. ". R. a. a
4 ;.-:-. I r-u-fi I ii'.-'l l "f e.t.l
Bioiilh".' l.i- :' :SI- Tra:.sei-ul or.ln:r
are inv.i.-J t-. ...! -vu.i ui. ,VjlJ rF ,r p
WM ! " " et -.ry. -
VA-,t '! iA iuv. :-o r. 1-.
JIm -.-.- i'r -i -j '-t 'it r i -V i-.,. -1-1.1 -j i-... .t t.
ea-b i.i .r.t i at At -- 'i..2.. V ' ;"
are c-rd::y 'l lo ,ist" V ':.''..'rt." i.- f
WM. liAl .u-c I . ill I I-
iiASSCDUNCIl-NO Iffil.U'lYAL j 1:CaXU.;
J meets tf.e fecoud and fourth Mondays o.
each mouth at Arcanum Hall.
cMuuio u. 2s. CJLESN, Kegeut.
r, C. Minor, Secretary.
PLATTSMOUTK BOARD OFTRiDE
President Kobt . B Vlnd ha...
1st Vice Presule.it. - A-
2nd Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer 1 t.ut'1,uaI!
nlRK.'TOKS.
J. C. Richev. P. K. White, J C. Pa""""
J. A. Conner, li. ENon. C. W. bheriuau. h. i.or
der, J. V. eckbach.
McCONIHlE POST 4S G. A. R.
M. A. Dickson ..Commander.
BEN.i IIfmplk .inor V .ce
8. CARRIUAS Junior .,,..,..,
8. CARR
Urn. NILKS
A. Shipman
llXKV STRKIGltr.
A , Ta rsch
JAM 4 111CK30N, ...
Adjutant.
surg
' -..A), to
tifllrerof the iay.
"" Vert Major.
U. O. Cukti t o
Meetiux Saturday evcuir-s
CF.SMiTH,
The Boss Tailor
Malu St.. Over Merges Shoe Store.
tt,. tlip. best -and most complete stock
of samples, both foreign and domestic
-nl.H tliitevorcann! west of Missouri
river Notcihi se prices: Du-iness suits
From iltt to $33, clr. -its, to 45,
panUi, $5, . ana uparus.
1PUEI
guaranteed a fit.
Pricss Defy Comoetilion
VKUDICT ACQUITTING
Iowa' Governor in tho L bil Suit Esturn
. ed by the Jury.
IN THE JURY ROOM 20 HOURS
Tho Jury Comos to a Misunder
standing of Instructions but
Decldea Quickly When
Explained to Them
Larrabee Receives c-onuratulatlons
Dks Moi.nks, Feb. 2G. Governor
L:irrHlce w.dks the earth tonight a vin
dicated man. The jury after sitting
upon his case for nearly twenty hours,
had their vision cleared by new in
structions from the court this morning,
and after a little more reflection came
back and reported "not guilty."
The jury went out at 2:45 yesterday
afternoon. They were expected back
from hour to hour during the afternoon
and evening, !ut came not. The judge
waited until 10;:0 and tiien went home
to be.l, leaving instructions tliat if they
reached an agreement during the night
they could leava a scaled verdict with
the bailiff. But tliat functionary's slum
bers were not disturbed as the night
wore away. After curt had convened
this morning no word came from the jury
room. Judge Conrad thought it about
time to find out whether the jury had
forgotten what they went out for; so he
sent the bailiff out after them. The
twelve autocrats filed in, looking as
though they rather enjoyed the greatness
thrust upon them.
' Gentlemen, have you agreed upon a
verdict f" asked Judge Conrad after
Deputy Clerk Jordon had culled the roll.
"We have not," answered DeMoss.
"What is the trouble?" inquired the
court.
'It appe nrs to be a disagreement in
reference to the instructions of the court"
replied Mr DeMoss.
"As to what?" "As to the paper
marked 'exhibit A.' "
"Yes; as to the effect of that, in regard
to its being a privileged document or
not."
"Is that the trouble with you ali?"
Tlii solid looking forem m bowed his
head in assent. The court theu asken for
a copny of the instructions furnished the
jury. It was handed to him, and Judge
Conrad, instructing thebaliffs to keep all
persons from the jury, and remarking
that he might modify the instruction so
as to. make them clearer, retired to his
private room to look them over, while
the crowd, somewh-.t smaller than on
previous days, waited expectantly and
discussed the pros and cons of the c:ise.
Aft- r a period of disappearance and
reflection, Judge Conrad came back with
Si:n : more instructions, lie dwelt upon
the privilcg.-d character of the .indica
tion or pamphlet known' us Exhibit A."
They stated in langu tire . uum:.d:ikab!e
tii it the governor had I he liht to K'v0
t!K' public- the p pers that were oh fde in
his o.'.ice,aff. ctiiig a pardon case, as these
lid. Furtii-rmo.-e, that in :rdcr to
i'sta'ilicsh libel under the indict! r.e;it th"
prosecution toilet have s-how:t wilful
;i.i!iee o;. the p -rtof the gov ror m
eireul-itiu I lie .-tateui M.ts alleg.-.l i'or the-
urposc? of prove ki.ig M s. T : y t
.vr.it it r ixpoMi:r h r to pub'.S !. ifred.
o itcitipt ; ri-i.-c il , 'and v'i -her.''
i:d thj court, "yovi find sa d vl' ments
pe.-linept, m ite rial or not Lef a von
eouyict, you must find that th -y were
maliciously circulated by the defendant
in the manner and for the purposes here
inbefore directed."
With this clear understandin 2 of the
cise it did not take long for the jury to
reach a conclusion. At 11 o'clock a sharp
knock at the door of the jury room pro
duced silence. The bailiff wen', to- the
door and heard the word that there was
a verdict, and notified Judge Conrad that
the jury had agreed. Judge C.mrad sent
out for Judge Barcroft, the attorney tor
the prosecution, and the spectators
awaited in breathless silence tho result of
the trial. The jury, at precisely 11:05
tiled iato the court room and took their
seats.
"Gentlemen of the jury," said the
judge, "have you agreed upon a verdict?',
"We have," said Foreman Dw-Mos9,
with a sigh of relict.
"Pass it to the clerk," said Judge Con
rad.
"Listen to the reading of the verdict,"
said Deputy Jordan.
"We, the jury, find the defendant,
William Larrabee, not guilty."
"Is that your verdict?"
"It is" said the jury.
"So say vou all?'' inquired the clerk.
' The jurors all bowed. Judge C.nr id
then excused the jurors for the day.
There was a clapping of hands, which
the court promptly suppressed, und then
the crowd filed out of the room. Neither
.Mrs. Turuey nor Mrs. Gillette were pres
ent when the verdict was announced.
Consequently the dramatic emotional
features which sotne.had anticipated were
wanting.
The goyernor was in hi? oflice at the
state house when the telephone announced
his acquittal. lie seemed greatly re
lieved and somewhat surprised, for he
rather expected that the jury would hang
after it had stayed out so long, but the
difficulty with the jury seemed to be ns
to whether a copy of a privileged com
munication was also privileged, and
could be given to the public the same as
the original papers could be. When
that point was cleared irp a verdict was
soon reached.
All the rest of the. day the goyernor
was busy receiying congratulations from
his friends. He starts for Washington
tonight to attend the inauguration,
althongh after the jury had been out a
few hours, and a disagreement and a new
trial seemed ineyitable, he had abandon
ed his intention of making the trip.
Public sentiment is well pleased with the
result of the verdict.
Flower Is Dead.
Kearney, Neb., Feb. 27. Considera
ble excitement prevailed on the streets
yesterday about the shooting which took
place last evening at Kelley's hotel. The
wounded man lay in a stupor all day and
died at 5:30 this evening.
J. W. Griffith, who did the shooting.
has been in jail all day and refuses to say
anything about the matter. He is a clerk
in C. E. Hansen's land oflice, and is a
highly respected young man.
A post mortem examination was held
last night, and the inquest today.
It has since transpired that the negro
was at one time a member of the Olive
gang of horse thieves that infested cen
tral Nebraska, and was considered a
tough character.
Cleveland's Proclamation.
WASHrsoTON, Feb. 27. The president
has issued the following proclomation:
Whereas, public interests require that
the senate should be convened at 12
o'clock on the 4th day of March next, to
receive such communications as may be
made by the executive; now, therefore,
I, Grover Cleveland, president of the
United States, do-hereby proclaim and
declare that an extraordinary occasion
requires that the senate of the United
States convene on the 4th day of March
next, at 12 o'clock noon, of which all
persons who shall at that time be entitled
to act as members of that body are hereby
required to take notice.
A High Figure.
Fremont, Neb., Feb. 37, .Suit has been
begun in the district court by Miss Min
nie Rynold and her sister, Mrs. Frank
Hoagland, against Uie Fremont, Elkhurn
& Missouri Valley railroad fur $30,000
damages. These ladies were in a wreck
on the Elkhorn road which occurred a
short distance east of Fremont on the
night of Nov. 4. Their injuries, were
quite severe, and they have beon laid up
in consequence of them during the winter.
Th-y h ive em.d-iyed a YorkjMttorney " to
prosecute the r cn?o,
, Killsd by Hu 3rot!i3r.
Albion, Neb., Feb. 2 J. Fred Spieg. 1
the son of Andrew Spiegel of Oakland
precinct, this county, was shot and in
stantly killed by hi- younger brother.
It seems they were out near the barn
with an old musket loaded with buck
shot, which they thought was unloaded,
and the younger brother, aged ten,
pointed it at Fred and pulled the trigger
the whole charge taking effect in his left
side, killing him instantly. The coroner
went out but did not find occasion to
hold an inquest, as it was purely ac
cidental. Windom Cets the Treasury.
Baltimore, Feb. 26. Hon. William
Windon, ex-secretary 'of the treasury,
spent tonight in Baltimore as the guest
of-John S. Oilman. Tonight be was
closeted for some hcurs with Stephen B.
Elkins, Henry G. Davis and others.
After the conference one of the gentle
men announced to a reporter that Windom
had been tendered and had accepted the
position of secretary of the treasury: in
General Harrison's cabinet. He will go
to Washington tomorrow morning.
The New Shade.
Aunt (who is entertaining Miss Breezy
of CliicazoV Tliat is a beautiful dress
you have on. Geraldino. and the shade
-eems to be quite new.
MLsa Brvezy (complacently) Yes. it is
a new Chicago shade, called the "pig's
snore." LuV.
- --
HOLY INNOCENT HOAXERS.
PRACTICAL JOKES PLAYED ON MEXI
CAN ALL FOOLS' DAY.
Very Fanny Editors, Who Can "Pke" to
Their Heart' Content Bogus BandlU
and Make Believe Highwaymen Prank
Coittly and Troableanme.
From hia appearance the average
Mexican would never lie cliarged with
tho crime of practical joking. In fact an
American would think more than twice
before ho tampered, jokingly, with the
quiet dignity and solemnity, two char
acteristically intuitive qualities of the
Mexican Don. owina- to the latter s readi
ness with the revolver and dexterity with
the Btilctto.
Ye, on occasion the Mexicans, from tho
little toddling boy to the white haired
Don and the dark eyed benorita to the
old wrinkled Senora, are the greatest of
all practical jokers. It becomes a sort
of mania with them, an it did with their
ancestors hundreds of years a;:o
Doc. 28. the anniversary or the slaugh
ter of the Holy Innocents, as the babes
who were killed by King Llerod on the
birth of Christ are known, is tho day of
all others in Mexico. The arrival of
Fiesta de los Santos Inocentcs is
anxiously looked for every year, and
when it comes it is ooserved wunout
stint. The exact origin of this peculiar
day as one devoted to practical joking
nan been lost, so ancient is trio custom in
Spain.
i he tact tnat it is spoken or as uie ciay
of Holy Innocents seems to have inspired
the Spaniards with the idea of making
innocents or fools of one another and any
one else that can possibly be victimized.
Ever since this hannv thought occurred
to some ingenious Spaniard Borne time in
the Fourteenth century the day has been
duly recognized.
BOGUS NEWSPAPER SCARES.
The ways of celebrating it are, of
course, many and varied. Mexico offers
a particularly fertile field in this peculiar
pastime, owing to tno eruptive tendency
of the government und people. A
country in which a citizen inquires of
hi3 neighbor the first thing each day,
"Who is president this morning?" natur
ally affords an ingenious practical joker
abundant material for unlimited pranks.
The newspapers are the leaders in re
cognizing the day after the popular form.
All sorts of bogus stories are artfully
written so as to create immense excite
ment, yet the circumstantial facts are eo
related that suspicion is seldom aroused.
High government officials are generally
assassinated (in print) and robberies com-
nitted of great magnitude.
On one occasion a gold mine of fab
ulous wealth and extent was discovered
four miles out of the Cit y of Mexico, and
the same day two-thirds of tho popula
tion of the town had foisaken their
homes to hunt for the mythical bonanza.
Another favorite mode ox liaymg court
to the Holy Innocents is to frighten the
out from (he capital by publishing alarm
ing stories of a threatened raad by bands
of bloodthirsty Indians and bandits.
Mounted couriers in the employ of the
newsbaners leave , the larger .city with
abundant supplies of the newspapers,
and, dashing at full speed into the
doomed town, throw tho residents into
a panic by reading from the public
squares the horrible fate that awaits
them. In a rew minutes tno whole
place is in a terrible state of commotion,
and in another hour the town, ia com
pletely deserted. Every owe takes to
th high road and make tho best ttmo
possible to the larger city and safety.
wnen mo iiouji is uiscuvereu, no mat
ter what the cost ta the victims, no
trouble ever ensues. They pack up their
good ;, collect thefr fsnuHas nd return
in IutIi EQpd humor to their homes.
thankAil that they have theia to go to,
and promising one another that they
vvill n.jt allow themselves to bo fooled
next year.
Yet when ncx yoer does como and
vitli it the' tcr-rivle news tbat yellow
'ever or rotno other deadly .scour.jo is
i i t!u vLinity. thres-.tenins to
. p-r..j-.:;t wlu.'l,' If.vn by its rav
; ; l"'.' jK-iij.- r.r.:t tin r cv.ol at ion9
.n:i::! .ul i.u previous year. Provi
.... ..:v h.;s;:l,' p.:i:.:-l und safety is
. .: ii ill. iiv:ii"..y l.llla :v.id inoiui
i ;-u i .ill", t-i i f;;:n:!L's
'.-: :i l :i .L-ya Let'cro
, .. .- i .", t; ' r;x::i tht'TM v.. ; (lis-
nr.: siu i iztit szu.
i ..:.'. .1 l!;o crept n.st- of tv-ato iac'i
..:..! ;::v tho commonest, laocc of cele
...Lin the t'.ny. It l; i.o uncommon
.I:v; !ura v.-ciriLhy .K1 Don wulking in
hided p. rl ion -f the town to Und
If Kn:denly confronted by two
J UKiixau'ers, willi revolvers in
. ir hand.- nd knives in their belts,
ao command him to give up Ids valu
;v.iot!y or they will tako his life
id valuables both. The next day he is
;t -really turpiisod when he receives
:is valuable:, accompanied by a cask of
a ine aud a neat littio note, stating that
ue wa:i merely made a temporary sacri
'ioe to King llerod.
On one occasion notices in all tlio
daily papers in the City of Mexico an
nounced that grand bull fight voul4
occur on the afternoon of Dec. 28, and
tliat, as the admittance to tho amph.
theatre on this occasion would cost notV
insr. every one was cautioned VV be vp
hani oarir.
A Healthy Town.
""Where have you passed your vaca
tion?" asked one clerk of another.
"At the beautiful little village of Z."
"Is it a healthy locality?"
r Healthy L It's so healthy tliat in or
der to start their new cemetery they
were obliged to assassinate an inhab
itant." America. -
A Common Want.
Brown See here, teamster, I don't
want you to bring gravel and clay and
bowlders to nil up tins lawn with.
Teamster Wliat th dickens does yer
want, then?
-I
Brown Oh, nothing, only the earth.
Yankee Blade. -
THE POPULAR
0E- PRICE CLOTHIER
Has lgft lor the Eist to buy the Finest, Largest ami Cheapest
Stock of
Spring and Summer Clothing
Ever Brought Bto Casa county.
lEEats a.n,c5- Capo,
Than You Ever Saw in Flattsmouth.
LOOK OUT
GRAND SPRING OPENING
'cJT CO
lias not got one dollar's worth of Spring Goods, or old Shelf
Worn Goods. Everything you will see in his store
will be Bran New, of the
LATEST STYLES
At Such Low Prices it
COII OUT OF BOSKS !
30.000
Worth of Dry Goods
JOSEPH V. WECKBACH
Has decided to close ont his Dry Goo Is Business in
this city. The entire Stock
Must Be Sold By April 15th-
JTOIl BARGAINS
Ii
n Dress Goods, Satins, Sateens, Millinery, Notions, Gloves,
ttosery. Underwear, Gent's Furnishing, Ladies' Muslin
FToserv.
Underwear, White Goods and
Special HBarQains in Carpets
Domestics in large quantities. We invite inspection. Please
Call and examine for yourself at
The - Daylight - Store.
Don't Forget our Stock ot
OOTS -3iTlD SHOES I
Remember JOE will Buy
FOR JOE'S
IES'
AUD PATTERNS
"Will Astonish You.
DOLLARS
to beSold at Cost
Linens, Blankets and Fiannels.