The Plattsmouth daily herald. (Plattsmouth, Nebraska) 1883-19??, September 19, 1883, Image 4

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    " .. .4..., t V ' I
:
6 & M. R. R. in Nebraska!
MAIN LINK
STATIONS :
WKT.
NO. 1.
Mo. S.
FlatUmoutn ..
OreapolU .....
Concord
Cedar Creek..
LouUvtll.
Mouth lieud...
asbland.
:no am
V :'A a ni
V :3i a iu
:4 u in
lo .-04 a u
10 MT a ni
11 4)3 a m
:AA p Ul
7:10 p ni
7 :'. p ni
7:44 p m
7 44pm
:10 p iu
dUOVIO
S :4fl p m
Ar.
L'v.
Ar.
lva
Ar.
L'v.
Ar.
L've
AT.
L're
9 jop m
10 :I5 p lit
3 :I5 a m
S 30 a m
! JO C HI
i i2n o m
1:66 pm
fl :: a n
rao p iu
a his a ni
13 :Mp Ul
juop ia
lo p III
3um
Ma in
li :v win
C UlS p in
6 op ni
lo :0O p m
oa a ni
Ar.
iiriM thai. uoia
CAST.
VO.S.
Mo. 4.
jusuj
oreapoll ......
Ar. t 'puiAr,
-.60 a iu
SdOaiM
ncoro.. ......
Cedar Creek...
I oalavilh
cutb Bend..
A (bland
ieenwod .....
Uneola: ......
Uastla
Krd Cloud
IteCook
Akron.. .. .....
Denver.... ..i.
:aS p in
Ar...
Ar.
Ar.
Ar.
Ar.
Ar.
Ar.
L'TO
Ar.
l.'ve
Ar.
L've
Ar.
L've
Ar.
L've
L've
Ar. 4 m p m
a3 a n
At.. 4:1a. pin
:17 a ui
:oo a m
7 : a tn
7 -.34 a m
3 30 am
Ar. IKpn
Ar. Ida pm
Ar." I :ll p m
Ar. S:0'p
lv a it p
Ar. aui
10 :1ft p ui
10 30 p Ui
L'velo:lOa
Ar. imi
0 Vbb p Iji
L've Ktt
7 :46 p II
Ar. 3;Ma
3 -00 p Ul
AO P Ui
10 -Mt a ui
11 Mi a u.
7 35 a in
i.'v 4 .oe a
ar. 10 :4& p
L've ' :55 p
L.'f 1 :uo p
Traiaa3nd4. numbering 39 and 40 westol
Kea ciouu. run aauy except ouoauy.
K. C ST. JOK & C. B. R. R.
h
STATIONS: 11 vn;0
IMattsoiouth..
Oreapolia
4 o a m
(Ma ra
6 :ll a in
cm a m
t wo a ni
5A p ii
6 :07 p u
6 :ll p n
6 :'JC ii
ft :U . it
U i lane i
tie levue I
Omaha I
STATIONS i
BXrBKbS TRAINS GOINU
SOUTH.
flattHiuoutb .
Uieapoila ....
La 1'Utte ...
belle vue ...
Oman a. . ..
9 20 a m
:10 a in
J :00 a ui
o :4I a iu
:. a in
8 :10 p li
:00 p b
7 :.'i l ii
7 j n
7 USi p
:ll
TIJ1K TABLE
MiMMouri Pacific Railraad.
Express
leaves
golne
OCTH.
7.40 p. in
.1I "
.42 "
9.24
d.37
tO.07
.H7 a. li
va p. ii.
Express
leaves
goiiiK
HOUTU.
ire ik t
leaver
golLg
SOUTH.
OlBAhft"
t'lUki"U.
Hpriuglicld
Louisville
Weeplug Water.
AVuca
Hun bar
Kauaas City
bt. jjonla
8.00 H.IU
14.37 "
9.0 "
.15 "
9.40 "
9 63
0.21 "
7.07 p.m.
a.m.
I Z.Oo a iu
2.0U p. Ih
3.05 "
3 50 "
5.00
S.45 "
Uollig
NOK1H.
MOUTH
OKTH.
8 5za.ni
8.3a p. in
6.lo a. iii
8.32 p.iu
7.67 a. in
1.24 p.iu
,.64 -5.08
"
.33 "
48 "
b. 15 "
Vauaa City
luubar. .-
ivuca.
Weeping Water.
Louisville
bprinlleid.
fapUiion. ..
iMifft arrive
1.01 p. li!
2.10 "
2.45 '
3.5.1 "
4.25 "
0 45
ti.Oi '
i.iJ
0. 51 '
1. ao
i.00
The above Is Jeflerson City time, which is 1
mmulRi luster (hau Uuiaha tliae.
UUIVAIi A.U DKPAKTl'BK Ui
rLA'llttilOUTIl .1IAILH.
ABHIVCa.
i3u p. in. i
J. 30 . in.
B.tX) si. IU. I
huW . .11.
, l.oo a in
r.M p. in.
i a ai. i
;.3U p. in. i
DKPAETr
K ASTERS.
s y.uo a. i..
p. II.
i y.uv u. u.
6.65 p. Ui
4.25 p. li
9.UO a. li
j 8.25 a. m
4.25 p. Ui
8.00 a. i.
WKSTKKN.
KOKTBKBN.
SOOTHKHN.
OMAHA.
.oo p. m. wkepi.no watih.
ll.oo am. rACToaYViiojt.
l.oo p. m
Uee. 17, 18rI.
tUkTKs CUAKUED FOB BOSM
OUUKKrt.
onlni not exceeding 315 - - - 10 cent
Over S15 and r.t exceediug $3V - - - 15 cent
avi " - 40 - - 20 cent
- 4o $5 - 25 cents
a ain rU ;i.nAv Order mar uivtu.. .u
amount Iroin oue cent to Blty dollars, hut
ir.ii.-ti not coutain a lrac.iouai part oi a ceui.
KATES FOH P08TAUK.
tat class matter Uettem) 3 cents -per ounce.
vj - ( ruonsutr a rates; x cts per iu
(Transieut Newaproers ana
books come under this cutss; 1 cent pet
each 2 ounces.
41 ! class (uiervbaudiae) 1 cent per ounce.
J. W. Marshall P.M.
OFFICIAL DIRXCTORY.
CITY UXKECTOKT.
GEORGE S. SMITH. Mayor.
WiLLlAJl U. CUSULNti. ireasurer.
J. O.siar-sO.N. City Clerk.
wiLLtrr furr ENtiitit. foiice Judice.
K. B. WlNiHAM.City-AXturney.
!.- i. MUKfHV.Chietol 1'olice.
1. Mc-CANN.Uveraeerof StreeM.
C. KlKH.SKli, Clue! ot Eire Urpu
8. ii. itlCUMON t. Ch'u rorU 01 Health
COUXCILUKX.
1st Ward Wm . ilerold. M. hU Bons,"1 '
2nd Waru J.M. r-attersou. J. H. E air he id.
3ti Ward Jl. tf- JklUTiihy, J. K. Morrison.
tu Ward K. U. Leuuhoit. AicCaliau.
- - aCHOOI. BOABiV ' - -'
JESSE B. 8TKOlE, - J. W. BABxSES. "
M. A. U ABXIO .N Wm. W IN 1 fc.no I KEN.
Ih it. BKxNNtrrr, : . V. V- iiiONAltO.
fbtm9t0riSO. W. MABSHALU
o
COUNTY DIRKCTOBY.
V. IL NEWELL, County Ireasurer.
J.W. JKSSlSxii, County Clerk.
J. W. OHNmjn. County Jude.
B. W. UkEBS. aherill.
tiilUS ALiON.up'to( Pub. liLstruction.
ii. W. EAlttElKLD, County Surveyor.
P. P. ViAifc. Corouer.
COCMTY COMMIMIOXKRS.
JAMES CBAWKOBU. South Bend Precinct.
liM L K1CUABLI40N. Jit. Pieaaani Precinct.
A. iOii, Plattsmouth ,
ifertle having busiuess with the Count)
Coiuniuiwnis. will Had them iu session the
Pint Monday and Tuesday ol eacb month.
o
BOARD OF TKADK.
J. A OONNOB. UENBY BJiCK, Vice-Presi
dents. .
ki visf Srfeirtarr.
KBE1. GOBUE It. Treasurer.
Kegular meetings of the Board at the Court
nua-.tuenrsl Tuesday evening 01 each month.
J. F. BAUME1STER
? urnUnes Frerh, Pure isllk
DELIVEREU OilLV.
OjOdil raa attended to. and iTresb Milk
from aaiaa furniabed wben wanted. Iy
LATTSUOUTH MILLS
XT8MOUTB NKB,.
IrjritJtor.
' -Greenwood
Lincoln- Ar. II
L've I'J
Hastings 1 Ar. i
Bed Cloud Kr. t
L'V. i
MeCook Ar. ,i
l.'vel.
Akron I Ar.
Denver II Ar. t
It L TH 1
STATIONS 1
rUttamoath Telepbone Excbanire.
.1.1. Yiki. reildeiiee.'
1
a
- s
4
6
7
10
14
15
l
17
18
19
20
21
23
23
21
26
28
' 28
29
31
32
34
36
38
37
M
39
40
41
12
43
44
45
M
47
49
50
n
435
HO
m
o
515
Bennett A lewl. store.
M. B. Murphy ti Co.,
Bonner Htabfes.
County CI rk's offlco.i
E. B. Lewla, residence.
J. V. Weekliaeb, store.
Weatoru Union telegraph ofllre.
U. 11. Wheeler, reaidence.
I. .Caiupbetl, "
K. I. Wliiduam, "
J no. Waymau,
J. W. Jenuinica. "
W. H. Wise. oUlce
Morrisaey broa office.
W it. Carter, atom.
41. W. E airfield, raaldence.
M. B Murphy,
1. II. Wlieeier 8ti-o . office.
J. P. Taylor, residence.
Elrat National Bank.
P. K. Kunner'a ofUce.1
J. P. Young, store.
Perkins House.
K. W. livers. residence.
Journal office.
E air Hi-Id's ice onice.
11 Kit ALU Pt'B. CO Office.
J.N. Wm, reildence.
rt, M. Chapman, "
W.U. Jones, "
A. N. Aulllvan, "
II. K. Palmer. "
W. II. rtchlldknecht, office.
Sullivan & Woo ey,
A. W. McLautfhllu. residence.
A. Palterson. livery.
C. M. Holmes,
L. It. Bennett, residence.
(jvo. 4. Smith, office.
L. A. Moore, Our st.
J. W. Karnes, resideuce.
K. K. Llvliigaton, office,
J. V. Weckoacli, residence.
Cbaplaiu Wright.
W. M. Hcblidkneeht
Oeo. S Smith, M
Jt. K. Livingston. M
C. C. Ballard,
The switch bgardonnects Plattsmouth witl
vsuiaua, Arlington. Blair. Council Bluffs. Pre
noot. Llncolo. Omaha Elk horn 8tatloi
tapllllon. Springfield, xxiulsvUle South Bern
uid Waverly.
PROF-SSIONAL CARDS.
SMITH & IICESO.V,
TTOKNEYS AT LAW. Will practice in at
he Courts in the state. Office over Eirst Na
lonal Bank. 4tyl
FLATTDMOUTH - MP.BR4SKA.
I It. A. MALISlll'UV.
DBUTIST.
ifflce over Smith. Black & Co's. Drug Storr
'lrst clxis dentistry at reasonable price-, 231.
(If. 31KAUK. 31. .,
PHYSICI VN and SURGEON. Office on Vali
street. Sherw Rlnrlr uintii .11.. dm..
. - , . v. , viUb.
open day aLd Bight
COUNTY i-mslciAN. CASS COUNTY.
M. O DONOHOE
ATTOKNEY AT LAW & NOTAKY PDP.LIC
Kitzgerald's Block.
PLATTSMOUTH, - MKK1U8KA
Agent for Stea-nsUip lines to and from Europi
d!2w52ly
K. . E.1VIS biMTO.V. M. h
PUY8ICIAN A 8UBUKON.
OFFI E HOUKS, from 10 a. m.. to 2 p. m.
xaiuin.i ir burgeou lor U. S. Peusion.
IK. H. 31 lL,I,Klt.
PHYSICIAN AND 8UKGEON.
an be found by calling at bia office, corner 7t!
lid Alain Street, in J. 11. Waterman's house.
PLATTSMOUTH . NEBRASKA.
JAM. H. JIATHIiWM
ATTOKi.'EY AT LAW.
fflce over Baker & Atwood's store, nouth aid
t Alain betweeu 6M1 and 6th streets. 21tf
"TKOIIE A CLAKK.
yriOUXEYS AT LAW. Will practice in ai
1 e Cum ts iu tbo Mate.
District AtVtnfj and Xotarv Public.
W4I..L, 4. WINK.
COLZCTJOA".V si SJE-CJZT 2.
ATTOKNEY AT LAW. Heal Estate. Eire Ii;
iraueeaiid Collection Agency. Office Uni..
n;k. riamiiioutU Nebraska. 22in:
l. II. lVIIRHLEB at CO.
LAW OFFICE. Heal Estate, Fire and Lifeln-
r . - .... ...... iu u tu, ilCDIiUfta. t JOl -
Lines 7t.r Vh '?' ","!i'': aosiraci
.i vnV "taie, negotiate
. 16J1
J A JIES K. JluKRlSOX,
ATTORNEYAT LAW. WprtmCas
uid adjoining Counties ; gives -peciaiatteutioi
. collectioiis and abstracts of title. oiBce u
.tzgerald Klock. Plattsmouth, Nebraska:
J. C XEIVBERRT,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE.
I is his office in the front part of bis resldenc.
u Chicago Av.-nue. where ne may bo found li
-admess to attend to the duties of the ot
lce- 47tf.
ROBERT II. WIXOUAS,
Notary Public
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
onice over Carruth's Jewelry Store,
lattsmouth. .... Nebraska.
M. A. HARTIQAN,
X A w Y E It ,
FirzuitjiALB'g Block, Plattsmouth Neb
Prom pt and careful attention to a general
-'tw Practice. h
A. H. SULLIVAN.
attorney" and Counselor-at-Law.
OFFICE In tha Union BlMk. front
.'oeond .story, sou t. Prompt attention given t
tii uumDw . tnar'J.'.
BOYD & LARSEN,
Contractors and Builders-
Will give estimates on all kinds of work. Any
"" icu ni me Lumoer xaras or 1 ost
Office will receive promot attention
Heavy Truss Framing,
for barus and large buildings a specialty.
For refeienea apply to .1. P. Young, J. V. We-
;i or u. a., water man & Bon. dftw
Dr. C. A. Marshall
(Successor to Clutter & Marshall.)
DEHITIST !
Preservation of natural teeth a specialty.
Teeth extracted without pain by use of
JLaughing das.
AU work warr.inttd. Prices reasonable.
Fitzuebald Block. - Plattsmouth.Neb
J. I. SIMPSOX,
AGENC
FIRE INSDRANGE CO'S:
CITY, of London, .
QUEEN, of Liverpool
FIREMAK FUND, of California
EXPREESS C01IPANIES
AMERICAN EXPRESS CO.,
WELL'S KARGo m EXPRESS - -
OdhMia jcotf&wxax Block, wttb ToB9om Broa
SOtSib
arreaali Cajia4taai Meane Wires, aael
Their Wtrk.
Cbicaaro Timea. .
A word about this French-Canad Ian houae
wife, though the deasrvea chapters: "I hare
drifted of late into turns of the moat deaolate
and poTerty-ctrlcken collections of wretched
huts which the mind can conceive which,'
Indeed, it Is next to impossible for an Ameri
can to oonoeire at all hamleta where the
men, with gaunt, burnt face, lone, matted
hair, forms twisted in middle ace as with us
at SO, by reason of privation, exposure, and
unsettled hopelessness, and clothes altogether
indescribable in their meanness, appear to
the vision like specters from some raft of a
"Medusa." But even here I saw no woman.
young or old, who was not neat in her per
sonal appearance, painfully clean to the care
of her home and apparently in the habit of
doing three-fourths of all the work that was
done. The amount of labor that this poor
but contented creature perform is nothing
leas than marvelous.
Premising that before the age of 85 she ia
usually the mother of from six to twelve
children most French-Canadian girls are
narried bofore tboy are 18 let m consider
her work for a moment: Bhe has, first of all,
the care of her children, which ia not a slight
thing, even though they are the most careful
and self-reliant of all the world's urching;
then she does all of her cooking, baking her
bread out in the sun in a stone oven built near
the house; she does all the washing and mend'
ing of clothes; she does all her own sewing
ind knitting, and, in some parts, spinning;
me keeps all the money of the household, and
oaken all the purchases ; sne scrubs the front
teps and all the floors of the living rooms in
her house every day. and she whitewashes the
outside of her house once a fortnight or so;
if they have a cow she milks and cares for
it; and then (we have dealt thus far only with
the incidental occupations by which spare mo
nents are filled up) she works all day in the
leld with the spade, hoe or rake. If she is
tear salt water, she also salts down barrels of
jom-cod and flounders for the latmlv s winter
Lse. If she lives near a town she also gns in
vith the horse and chaurette to the market,
uk! knits while she is not selling produce, on
two days of the week.
The race does not anywhere afford a more
tj per b spectacle of industry than this woman
presents. And with all that she manages to
teep, if not a fresh, at least a bright and
:herry look upon her face; she drosses herself
for church well and tastefully, and carries
bur good clothes as if she was accustomed to
lothing else; and her children, particularly
he girls, are models of cleanliness and good
rder. This, bear in mind, is as true of the
poorest and most isolated hamlets as it is of
she well-to-do surburban villages.
The Xeed of Uenainc Fan.
Lilian Whiting in Inter Ocean.
One occasionally meets representatives of
hat unfortunate class, people who cannot
rake a joke, the solemn, careworn, anxious
Teople, who provoke the almost irresistible
lefiire to invite them to a boat ride and upset
'-he boat just where the water is of the right
lepth for comfortable ducking persons who
remind me of an elderly lady whom in our
hildhood we occasionally, met, whoso fre
pient questioning was, "Child what makes
you so frivolous and so merry? Why don
"ou just sit down and grieve, grieve an
grieve?" "VVe believe the one characteristic
ar commodity our busy nervous, anxious
Americans are most in need of is genuine
fun, an occasional regulur abandon of non
aense, and we know of but few classes of
leople who more strongly appeal to our
sympathies than those poor unfortunates who
?an't take a joke.
"Isn't it strange," queried a friend bnt yes
terday, "that the children of tho Rev. Blank
Try because they are so homesick, when the
other children have such glorious fun f "No,
was the reply, "those poor little children do
not know how to enjoy themselves, and they
iiave never been allowed to play much for
fear of soiling their clothes." We ponder a
.noment over that dialogue, and find our-
elves wondering if one of the reasons why
ninisters' children have acquired a univer
sal reputation for waywardness may not be
owing to the fact that their natural love of
fun and frolic and noise has been forever
suppressed (not so much by the fathers, for
the most partial study of the ministerial
brotherhood reveals the fact that they are
generally fond of fun and jokes), but the
-notbera, the wives of the ministers, im
pressed with the dignity of their position,
sometimes assume an almost unnatural so
lemnity and dignity, hoping thoreby to pre
serve the i lerical equilibium of the family,
-wmetimes crowd out the fun and frolic, gen
uine wit, humor, and fun being as essential
to the development of symmetrical charac
ters as prayer.
Do my words seem unnecessary to you, be
loved philanthropists, who are mourning
over the lack of earnestness, and apathy of
your fellow beings? We think this apathy
and indifference is the result of selfish care,
selfbh aggrandizement, not the resuli of
cheerfulness and genuineness.
Xew Oealjca for Wcarini the II air.
Clara Belle in Cincinnati Enquirer.
We have here in New York a society of
hair dressers. They meet once a month, and
each time consider new designs for arrang
ing women's hair. They have just made up
their minds how we shall wear our locks,
real and assumed, during the fall season.
They have agreed upon three styles, and I
am able to translate their directions into lan
guage that any woman can follow herself.
No. 1: Have the hair wet about three inches
deep from the forehead, and put it in paper,
so as to make large, soft curls what we call
at present Langtry curls or use. a false
piece to take the place of your own hair.
Waive the hair on temple with a curling
tongs. The rest of the coiffure is mado of
curled hair, wave and curls, with a ring at
the end. No. 2: Divide the front hair about
three inches from the forehead, from - one
ear to the other. Take hair-pins and twist
the hair round the pins instead of .'putting
out and in, as we generally crimp the hair,
and in turning the hair round the pins it will
exactly give the desired front coiffure. Tie
all the ends of the hair on top of . the head.
and add two or three pieces of natural waved
hair with the ends curled. No, 3: Take a
long, false switch and make a small braid,
curl the end of it, and mix one with the other
and let the end fall behind the ear. Tour'
on hair may be turned in a soft French
twist.
Eye n log's at Home.
The Signal.
We visited once in a large family where it
the duty of each sister in turn to provide
the evening's occupation, and there wa3 a
pleasant rivalry between them as U whose
evening should be the most enjoyable. The
brothers entered fully into the spirit of the
simple home entertainments, and were as lotb
to be obliged to spend an evening away from
home as their sisters and parents were to
have them absent. Every one spoke of this
family as an uncommonly united one, for
each and every member stowed such a strnn
attachment for the home to which each oue
contributed so much pleasure.
Water Power of the A Ins.
Popular Science News.
It ia now Oronosed to 11 KM tha (.nnrmnnc
water power of the Alps for working electric
railways in Switzerland. O Derations are un
derstood to be in progress now to connect
the towns of St. Moritz and Pontresina by an
electric railway four and three-fourths milm
long, the motive power to be supplied by tL.
mountain streams. Should the
succeed, the undertakers of the railway will
extent! It to the north for a distance of some
fortv-teven miles, and in a. Braithvlv him.
tion for about thirty miles, and thus effect a
second j taction between the Swiss end Italian
raiiwajri,
.Pittsburg- Telegraph: - An sjuthuaiastL.
country - exchange rerun Ire: "The bills and
valley are carpeted with the verdant crow..
ing crops. n ' The carpet, strictly epeaJting, im
til tee ifigrais varwey.
Care ef Beoi
Cor. Ladies' Floral Cabinet.
It is no economy to do with lees than throe
brooms, one made of - fine short broom-corn
for the parlor and bed-rooms, a larger one
for the more frequent uses and an old one for
the kitchen and walks. A whisk -broom for
cornors and furniture upholstered in worsted
wooden skewers to remove the dirt from the
corners of the door-sills and steps, a feather-
duster for books, pictures and ornaments, a
short bandied brush made of bristles to bru&b
the backs of picture-frames, window-blinds
and screens though this can be done with a
whisk-broom if. both cannot be afforded
will be found necessary weopons of warfare
in the contest with dust and dirt. Bags
made of canton-flannel, fuzzy aide out, and
with a draw-string to be tied over the broom
to dust walls and hard wood floors are very
useful, as' too much wiping with a dahij
cloth will in lure the lustre of tho wood
Chamois skins make the best dusters for fur
niture and can be bought for 30 cents,
and with careful washing will last for years.
They should lie washed in cold water
with soap rinsed, in clear water, and
hung in the shade. Before they re entirely
dry they can be rubbed and pulled till they
are soft again. Squares of cheap, soft, gray
linen or old fabric, with all raw edges
hemmed, are the next best, and these should
be washed every week after the Friday's
sweeping. We have everything now to work
with, except covers for tho largo pieces of
furniture which cannot be removed before
sweeping. Old sheets can be used, or squares
can be made of cheap calico or unbleached
muslin, and kept for thin purpose. There
should be one large enough to cover a piano
or a bed.
A piece of white mosquito netting slightly
damp, is considered by many the best thing
to dust painted woodwork with. Toothing
now remains to do but to dust the walls, wood
work and pictures, unless the dust is wiped
from the carpet with a clean cloth In a mop,
A pail of clean water can be set on a bit of
old carpet, and the cloth rung out dry as pos
sible, and lightly rubbed over the carpet. All
the dust that remains after sweeping will be
taken up with the damp cloth. A white
cloth is best, as that shows when it neels
rinsing. When the chairs are brought in and
ordered restored, the room is clean enough
for a prince, and with dusting daily, and oc
casional brushing with a carpet sweeper or
a damp broom, it will keep clean for a long
time, unless used more than most parlors are.
Ii.itcb.en Progress.
Inter Ocean.
Even in the kitchen inventive genius has
gained a strong foothold, entirely usurping
the primitive methods practiced by our
grandmothers in the performance of their
domestic duties. Mechanical contrivances of
all kinds supply what in former years re
quired deftness. Griddles themselves do the
cake turning. Eggs are beaten by a crank ;
the coffee bean is not only roasted and
ground by machinery, but tho drink mado
by a clever contrivance that considerately
whistles when the beverage H done. A child,
nowadays, may successfully fry Saratoga
pototoes. An open work basket is set in a
pan of fat, with the article to be fried in it
The pan is furnished with a high handle with
a hook in the middle. The instant the thing
to be cooked has assumed the delicate
zolden brown appropriate to viands cooked
n this way, the basket is lifted and hung
upon the hook to drip and dry. There
is no marring of the symmetry of out
line of the fragile delicacies, no spattering of
rrpaso in the endeavor to fish them out, and
chere are no last ones to burn while waiting
their turn to be taken out. Then the new
boiler, which permits the article to be
tightly shut in, obviating all danger of de
positing it upon th e floor or in the fire, but
catches every drop of juice that may exude.
When the boiler as turned over the juices are
turned back upon the meat, which thus bastes
itself. To those unsuccessful ones who have
not yet arrived at the solution of the prob
lem of how to cook a chop over a quick fire.
without burning the fat, these broilers will
bring success and relief from their perple x-
ities. Those fond ot- nicely-shaped griddle
cakes will rejoice over a griddle made with a
binge in the middle. One side has a number
of circular depressions into which the batter
is dropped. When the cakes are done on tho
under side, the griddle is simply folded over
on itself, which deposits them on their other
side on the opposite half of the griddle, leav
ing the empty places ready for more. Then
there are ironing boards covered and ready
for use, and the various articles, light and
serviceable and unbreakable, like buckets and
basins and foot-tubs, made of paper inache.
A Prophecy of Fall Fashions.
Clara Belle in Cincinnati Enquirer.
For styles for the coming season, plain col
ors seem most in favor, with ribbed or cord
ed effects, either perpendicular or horizontal.
Many plaids are seen, but very cautiously
managed, small in siz3 and carefully subdued
in color, except such as are intended for chil
dren's wear. Sometimes shades of only one
color are used, with perhaps a single thread
of some light color to define the pattern;
and the plaid material usually composes
only part of tho costume, plain material to
match accompanying it for the remainder.
Should this moderation continue, plaids may
be expeeted to remain longer than usual in
fashion, as they are useful fabrics, requiring
Jess trimming than plain materials, and not
showing the effects of wear so quickly. For
wool and silk alike there is a tendency to
lai-ge fioral patterns, self-colored that is, the
same shade as the ground for instance,
white brocaded satins for wedding dresses
'lave ferns, pond-lilies, sheaves of wheat or
lilac-blossoms in white silk. I am a head
long reporter, let me assure you, and what I
am writing now will be told again by or
dinary fashion " writers a month . hence.
'Cause why, I have gathered the informa
tion from several merchants' samples, ahead
of the : display ofthe goods in stock.
I am ablo to assure you, for . in
stance, that in cloakings seal-skin plushes,
softer and richer than those of pre
vious seasons, will be in vogue. An exact
imitation of curled Astrakhan will come in
cloth.. Astrakhan furs began, to return to
fasliion fast winter, and will be much used.
the coming season.
One Acre for Woman's Work.
Boston Cor. Inter Ocean.
A special feat&re this year ia the "Insti
tute" exposition is the "woman's exhibit," for
which one acre of space is granted, and which
is under charge of an association of the most
prominent women of Boston, the president
being Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, and the chair
man of the executive committee Mrs. H. L.
T. Wilcott, the accomplished wife of Colonei
Wilcott, of tho Hotel Vendome. The
woman's exhibit will include special inven
tions made by women, nearly all of which
are in the line of home comforts, decorations,
and artistic work, and it will not include
patchwork, pickles, or preserves 1 So much
for the "woman's exnlbiu
The Famous White Plume was Black.
Paris American Register.
We have lost another illusion. The Roy
alist oarxxs tell us that amon, tha Viiatstm'r!
souvenirs which adorn the salon3 of Frohs
dorff is the famous plume of Henry IV. ; only
this famous " white plume " is black. What
now becomes of the celebrated historical
phrase attributed to the father of the Bour
bons which has figured in books of histsu-v tnr
several centuries? " Follow my white plume!
10a wui always bnd it on the way of
honor." Now. the white nlnnw tnrn nut ti
bo a black One I Then, whv did rnr tnrhara
of history, and even Henry IV. himself, tell
us it was wcik! remaps tne ruavorrais said:
" Follow mv black tiliima." and wan
rectly reported at the tima. Or it may bo
.1 l -. , . .
lust iam lauious pjume oas grown DlacK with
asrs. though azB usually has & mntrarv fTatt
even on' chocolate, which, whan nannlnA-
gjvwi gray as it grows old.' Another suppo
sition is man toe gooa and confiding king
bought the plume of some dishonest trades
mr n who had colored the black on, wtita
and the color was not fast. We cannot do
m re than throw out bints for the students of
hirtorv: the bvnothesps to Ha. mHn nn
en singled historical puzzle' are aa QijLBtoroUji'
a liM pvVki itself i jmjwrtju't.
NING SHARKS.
Hlvr These "Confldenoe Men" ofthe
Mining Regions Entrap Their
Victims."
' Frank Wilkeson in New York Sun.
The mining bbarers are separated into
well-defined classes, much ascotdldent o ra
tors are in the east. Standing at the h'-nd f
the profession are tall, slender, gray-haired
men. They are well dressed. Their manners
are very agreeable. Their talk is exceeding
ly entertaining. The smiles they wear when
they see a well-dressed eastern man ami the
fact that one is from the east cannot bo bid
den from the Rocky mountain mining shark,
for his sharp eyes pierce all disguise am
calculated to Inspire confidence in the breast
of a stranger. They Ktalk their game
stealthily. A brace of these old, war' n,in
ing sharks having noticed that the stranger
takes an interest in tho display of mineral
shown at the exposition, mootly carefully se
lected specimens tons of ore yielding iounds
of specimens follow him to his hotel
and learn his name, whore ho is from, and if
he 1ms money.
If they cannot procure a regular introduc
tionan easy matter in the west they ap
proach him when he is hanging lovingly over
a case of choice specimens in the exiiosition
building. Apparently unconscious of his
nearness, they talk of the "clean up" at the
Golden Fountain, of the enormous output or
silver moon. They draw nearer to their vic
tim, who has listened attentively to their con
versation as they carelessly stroll from casa
to case. Suddenly, with well-affected inter
est, one of them taps a case containing pocket
specimens, selected from the choice ore from
all tho mines of an entire district, and says:
"Ah I here is ore from the extension of the
Golden Fountain. Bob's mine, you know. I
saw tho shaft last week. A three-feet crevice;
all pay." Then pretending to look attentively
at the ore displayed, and ore that would yield
thousands of dollars per ton, he says regret
fully, pityingly: "Poor Bob! he is too care
less, too honest. He should have sent selected
ore, not sent the run of tho mine. But be is
too sick to take much interest in anything.
Pneumonia, followed by mountain fever, j'ou
know. The doctor says he must go east, us
bis lungs are too weak to stand the light air
of the mountains. He will have to sell tbo
mine, and mines are dull at present. Then
follows an earnest denouncement of mining
experts and of the sharpers who have brought
the Rocky mountain mines into disrepute in
the east. These two men walk slowly down
the hall. They liave played their part and
played it well.
The eastern man imagines he has overheard
a genuine conversation between two miners.
When the sharpers have disappeared among
tho people who swarm in the exposition build
ing, he eagerly examines tho ore that is ex
hibited as from the extension of the Golden
Fountain. It is one of the kind that would
excite tho covctousness of even such a gener
ous, poetical creature as Jay Gould has
lately been discovered to be. The ore is shot
through and through with nuggets," "flakes"
and "colors," as a plum pudding with raisins
and currants. The brace of mining sharks
disappear, to be seen no more by their victim.
It is seldom one of these expert swindlers ac
cost a tenderfoot. They are careful not to
frighten him. He is turned over to about the
most agreeable man he has ever met. This
third man is regularly introduced. Ho shies
at mines and mining as a skittish colt does at
upturned stumps that lie at the roadside. - Ht
is stuffed full of tales and financial disastei
that have overtaken men who have bought
mines. These sad stories are generally true.
But he also has a stock of - tales about tin
successful miner, generally lies, and these an
bright and jovial stories. He earnestly ad
vises the tenderfoot to leave mines severely
alone: but then, if a really good mine can be
bought at low figures it is a legitimate busi
ness. The upshot is that if the eastern mar;
has any leaning toward mining, he is soon
the owner of the extension the Golden Foun
tain. He has paid thousands of dollars for a
worthless mine.
It is almost impossible for a stranger, un
acquainted with mining, to protect himself
if he buys a mine. There are a few a very
few really honest mining experts. The
purchaser of the Golden Fountain does not
know these men. Even if he did know tbem,
1t must bo remembered that the opinions ol
mining experts as to the value of an undc
veloped mine are worthless. No man can
see into the ground. An honest expert would
truthfully report to his employer what he
saw. He would examine the mine and efiti
mate its value. Any intelligent miner couJ''
do this as well as an expert. The probabili
ties are that the eastern man will fail to se
cure the services of an honest expert, lit
will pay one of the dishonest experts, a
fraud, who pretends to know things ttat are
unknowable, several hundred dollars to
know tho truth about the mine. The swin
dlers, who are selling tho mine, cheerfully
agree to pay the same expert, providing the
sale is made, as many thousand dollars to
lie. If the salo is effected, the purchase
money is divided into tho agreed tipon shares
and pocketed by the confidence men. These
swiiidlers arc well educated, and are familiar
with mining phrases and methods.- They
live well. They are bright and chatty. A
man who has tho least inclination to invest
iu mines is doomed to meet with a money
lo&s if ho falls in with those gentlemanly
thieves. His only safety is instant flight
from the land of mineral, where the air is
charged with the hallucination-producing
dust of precious ores.
THE NIAGARA PAES PEOJEOT.
The Owners of Xlacara Surveyor
at Work Value of the So-Called
"Improvements.
Cor. New York Tribune.
In the midst of all the clamor, w hen every
group boasts at least one man who. was the
last to talk with Webb before he boarded
Mcdoy's scow.ha important fact that the
state engineer is now surveying Goat island
as a vital step toward the establishment ol
the international park, is taken very quietl
even by those who hold property within the
reservation. It is not likely that opposition,
if there be any, will be manifested until the
appraisers come to do their work. That th
heirs of the estate of the late Gen. Porter
virtually own tho American sido of Niasrara.
is as true to-day as it was wben Miss Eliza
beth Porter, in reply to the question put tc
her by an Englishman, as to whether she
had ever seen Niagara Falls, said: "1 own
them, my lord."
The owners of Goat island are all Porters.
The Prospect park property is owned by an
incorporated company of about eight stock
holders, of whom Mrs. Jane Porter Town-
send is the chief. It seems almost incredi
ble, but it is a fact that the annual income
from Prospect park is not less than 45.000,
a portion of which is sunk every year in "im
provements; m other words, m making it
more and more of an excursion paradise.
A great deal has been written in just con
demnation of these so-called "improvements,"
but wben all has been said it will be acknowl
edged that the company has managed to
make the spot attractive to the average visi
tor. It has become through its electric
lights, Vienna bakery, fantastic foun
tains, emblematic mottoes and conven
iences by which the visitor can broil
bis chicken in foil sight of the cataract, the
great American picnic ground, the Sunday
school superintendent's paradise. And there
are other tourists who, if they had the cour
age of their opinions, would confess to enjoy
ing the air of : perpetual Fourth of July
about Prospect park; - In proof I need only
1 as tan oe toe steady shrinkage of the reraiptu
from the gate fees on Goat island, where
nature is unmolested and dead leaves rustic
in the over-grown paths. Oue can forgivw,
and even applaud the enterprising park cor
poration for making the paths smooth aud
the lawn trim, except when he remembers
that the moon has been forever eclipfiijd by
the vulgar phy-ant; tjcctijo Yht
a
C C11PLETE
Livery, and Sale Stable.
RIGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION PY OR NIGHT.
EVEllYTIiINO IS FIRST CLASS TJIE UKsT TEAMS IX THE CITY
SINGLE AND D0UHI.E CAKItJAfiKS.
Travelers will llin! complete oultils by calling at tlie
Corner Vin and Fourth Streets,
1IUN11NG AM)
Tin :.ATTSM0U II HEItALD PUBLISHING COMPANY Las
every facility for first-clasa
JOB FHISTT22TG,
In Every
A a B
uaiaiogues
LEGAL B XjAISTKIS,
A.TTOTXOISr BILLS,
SALE EHf.
COMMERCIAL
PjIIsTTI ETGr
Oizt StocTz-qf JBlctjiJc JDa.pera
And materials is larps and complete fn every depart inr
ORDHES -B"Z" IIVL'AIL SOLICITEr
VLA TTSMOUTIt JIE HA LI 0 V FiCE
SziljscT'ibe for tte JDa.Uu J IcraLd
rtTZLVEIBEIR.
EICEEY
OZEcJEsTIKK, OF PEABL
DEVLEIiS IN
Lumber.Sash,
laowesf Rates.
ALWAYS AHEAD
BENNETT& LEWIS
THE
LEAD NG
Come to the front
Staple and Fancy Groceries
FRESI7 AND NICE.
We alway3 buy the best jroods in the market, and guarantee everything
we sell We are sole agents in this town for the sale of
PERFECTION"
AND TOE
BATAVIA" CANNED GOODS
g finer in the market Plafn
n band. Com and ii mid
FLOrafc.
At Wholcsaleand Retail. Cash
paid for all kinds of 'country
produce. Call and see me.
Opposite First National Bank.
3lfcei,Tjb2.
fj
I'LATrsMOUTil. NEH.
PUBLISJ I G
Department.
Pamphlet Work
TjTJ IsL jB "Ej 3E
BEOS,
.JSTZD SEVEWTl
ALL KINDS OF
Doors, Blinds
!
air,
"ITerrns Gash
with a compute ttock of
GROUND SPICES
CELEBRATED
Tigtr" l iend of B-tlti rrin Oya
u illrnakp ym irlsd
FEE.
CHOCEM
A X D