Capital city courier. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1885-1893, September 26, 1891, Page 2, Image 2

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CAPITAL CITY COURIER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1801
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Tf.it Old Reliable
FOLSOM
-W ntlll Headquarters for-
Ice Cream
ices, Cakes. Candles. Etc.
Our Special
order depart-
ment foi
cutunnii
to private
residence and
most popular
parties is the
in the city
"Prompt delivery, pure goods
and reasonable
motto.
prices is our
ICE CREAM PARLOR NOW OPEN.
1307 0 St. Telephone 501
DON'T BE
CARELESS ABOUT
YOUR COMPLEXION
ll l woman's chlefcst pliyaleul eliiirm. It Is
often hr only enpllnl. It IsnUnyH worth n
urent ileal to her. In business love or soeiiil
nindr. No mutter now nrowneti or imiirii or
Hallow your skin mny be. or how much It Ik
tlUflffiireil with freckles, moth-patches, black
IicixiU or pimples
MRS. GRAHAM'S
FACE BLEACH
vrlll remiivo evere blemish nnil leave your
aklu ns pure nml eleurmul white, n It wiih Id
Imby iluys. Your complexion will then be iih
nnliiro miulu It. Instructions k with each
lioltle how to keep It so. l'rleu fl.V). All
linguists nell tt.
II. T. CLARKE DRUG CO.
WHOLESALE AGENTS.
ttUOQUAINTf D WITH IMS OIOO-UPMY Or TMI COUN1SY Mil OStAlh
MUOM INIOHMiTION mow A STUDY 0' 1MI HAP Of TMI
Th SIHXOT BOUTS to and from CitlCAOO,
XOCX ISLAND. DAVINPOIIT, DE8 MOINES,
COUNCIL BLVn-a. WATEHTOWN. SIOUX
VAILS. ICINNKAPOLIB, ST. PAUL, ST. JOB
XPH, ATOIIIBON. LEAVENWORTH. XANBAB
CITY.TOPKKA, DEN VKR, COLOKAOO BPNOB
sad PUEBLO.
SOLID VESTIIULE EXPRESS TRAINS
cf Through OoacttM, Slespers, Tnm Reclining
Chair Oat nnct Dlnlnit Oars dnlly bttwtsn OKI
CAQO. DK8 MOINES. COUNCIL BLUFFS nct
OX AHA, and IkIwhh CIIICAOO ami DENVEB,
COLORADO SPRINGS and PUEIILO via St.
Joatph, or Kansas City and Topeka.
Via The Albert Lea Router
Taat Express Trains dill) between Chtcatra
and Mlnuoupolls and Bt. Trail, with TIIROUQ1I
JUcllnlnu Chair Cars (FREE) to and from those
points and Kansas City. Throuuh Chair Car
and Sleeper between reorla, Spirit Lake and
Sioux Valla Via Ilock Island.
Tor Tlckots. Maps, Folders, or desired Informa
tion, apply at any Coupon Tiok et OtOce, or address
K. ST. JOHN, JOHN SEBASTIAN,
Oso'l Manager, Oen'l Tkt. Pass. Airt..
CUICAQO ILL
HOW IN NEW QUARTERS !
Lincoln Trunk Factory
o st H33 ST"
Where wt will be glad to 6cc all old
friend and customers'nnd as many new
ones a can get into the store.
O. A. IWtRlCK,
SUCCESSOR TO
VVIRICK & HOPPER.
LINCOLN
wp&:
aiiu ixhtitvtk or riMAxiiir,
Shorthand, snd 'rywrttln.U the but nml largrit
CollfKU In iue West, uo students hi nllcndalict lati
year. Stulrnts irenarcd lor butlnrts In from 3to
months. LMwrk-ucd faculty. Personal Iiistriictluu.
Beautiful jllustrau-d c-italoKue, rollra) Journalt. and
nrclmens ot rninaiuhls ent frit) by nJiln Blng
LUJJimiDOK & ROOSK. Lincoln, Neb
IBOOKWMIVE EUCHRE.
sBBlf PAosftBil MaIj Irt Jiltltf fiwn s . t tP A
b. :.k K-.E-TL. Chicago, and recelre. rxit'e'il3!
..I -- - . ..-. .
"w ws wh. www.v, II.HUW1.I
rem Ifi5 Jtfaiv 331
Chicago.Rocklsland & PaciflcRu
f JsT r ss 7tf
w?itm(fL
GETTING LONDON NEWS.
YANKEE COfWESPONDENTS AT THE
WORLD'S CAPITAL.
Ttir)' lllijiiy l.lfr, l.lve on th Kilt nf Hip
I.miiiI Mint Ala Millie Wiilcomn by Prr
simimbps of CiiiisriiiiDiice, but Thry Work
llnnl,
lHieclnt CorrmixMiilctico.)
London, Si'pt. 7. Tlioro Is irohnbly
no ot in journalism which American
iiovnmHT men doslro bo much ns that
of London correspondent, Tho nlttmtlon
In not only hlfthly lmld hut it involves no
email deirrco of dignity and importunco.
To he 3,000 iiilles from the K'-i of your
city editor In it relief to oven tho most
conscientious, hard working wrltoM,
The London correspondent Is its nearly
his own master ns any man can ho who
is attached to a dally newspaper, It is
understood that at so great a distance
from tho homo oftico Ills judgment must
lie rolled upon, and no wise concern
thinks of assigning it man to Loudon
without expecting to rely upon tho cor
respondent's discretion and faithfulness.
It ought to follow, then, that tho hand
ful of American reporters in this city
should bo tho cream of tho profession,
Whether that is so in every instance tho
writer cannot say, but ho has found
them an Interesting lot of fellows, faith
ful nml Industrious.
"Industrious" might seem to bo n mis
nomer to somo of tho rank and (lie in
America, if thoy should take a casual
glance at tho men as thoy appear in tho
corridors and smoking rooms of tho great
hotels, For just an Instant tho Ameri
can reporter might think that these boys
wero having a good time nml devoting
themselves assiduously to good dress,
luxurious apartments and dignified oaso
generally. Tho judgment would bo a
mistaken one. That thoy havo a good
time Is pretty certain, for they enjoy
their work, and for tho most of thorn
tho work takes them necessarily to
places where men of wealth and position
congregate. While tho correspondent is
chatting with a group of men ho is on
tho qui vivo for an item of news, or n
story for his Sunday letter. There is a
pinto for him at important banquets, ho
Is welcomed at many social functions,
and in other respects which reporters
know all about ho is an established ilg
tiro in English life.
Not more than threoorfourof tho cor
respondents are concerned in furnishing
"routine" news; that is, stock quota
tions, market reiiorts, parliamentary
proceedings, ordinary calamities and
tho like. AH this is relegated to the
great news associations that havo their
oftkes hero and their stalTs of local re
porters. In three instances Americans
are at tho head of tho Loudon ofllces of
news associations, but their employees
arc, 1 think without exception, English
men. To them the London newspapers
nro an invaluable aid, and much of their
uows is sent directly from tho printed I
columns alter mey nave appeared on me
street. Tho six hours' dlffereuco in timo
between London and Now York makes
this a perfectly legitimate and feasible
form of news gathering.
For Instance, somo of tho Imjiortant
evening papers appear at 1 o'clock; it is
then but a-few minutes after 7 in Now
York, an hour when tho evening nows
paper ofllces nro deserted, unless somo
energetic office boy has come down tin
usually early to clenn up. By wiring
the important news of tho day at any
timo Ireforo S p. m. tho American papers
nro supplied hours before they would
think of Issuing an edition. Tho satno
thing follows with the morning papers,
although tho results aro not quite so
satisfactory. It is quite possible, how
over, to send everything of Importance
iu tho London morning papers so as to
reach New ork by midnight, mid every
association takes a hand in this kind of
ojiernHon.
Tho correspondents of theso individual
papers do not concern themselves with
this manner of hustling. They dovoto
their efforts, ns I havo indicated, to get
ting inside information, working up
siwcial topics, that by tho very reason of
their American flavor would not natur
ally bo covered by tho Loudon press.
Tho dean of the correspondents hero Is,
of course, Mr. G. W. Smalley, of the New
York Tribune. His appointment dates
from the early seventies. Ho lives in a
fashionable ueighliorhood and does not
mlnglo much with his rivals, who are
nearly all much younger than himself
and naturally not the most congenial as
sociates. Mr. Smalley Is decidedly a
fixture iu British society, and it is there
ho is best known.
Next to him in seniority of appoint
ment is Mr. Harold Frederic, tho corre
spondent for the New York Times. His
career has been a brilliant ono on this
side, whoro ho has been statloued for
about eight years. He. too. annears to
bo n fixture in London, but ho frequent
ly makes long trips to tho Continent In
the pursuit of special topics. The result
of one of these trips was a series of arti
cles In Tho Times about the young Ger
man emperor. It was theso articles,
published In book form a few weeks
ago, that inado tho tjreatest llternry sen
sation of tho year. It Is not uecessary to
speak of Mr. Froderic's novels, for every
body knows about them, It mluht also
go without saying that ho is preparing
another. Ho is never idle, nml oven n
newspaper man may wonder how ho
finds timo to do all his work.
Mr. Arthur Warren represents the
Boston Herald. Ho is about tlitrty-ono
years old, aud a inau whose outhiiainsm
for his profession 1 havo seldom seen
equaled. Ho lives in a beautiful apart
ment hoiue iu tho district known as
Chelsea, and from his windows he com
mands a flue view of the Thames, Bat
terea park and a great stretch of the
Interminable city.
By common consent the hardest work
ing American newspaper man in London
Is Mr. E. Tracy Grenves, correspondent
or tho Now York World. Ho has ofllces
In Trafalgar square, where you may
have a reasonable chance of finding him
at any hour of the day or night. Not
content with pursuing tho gnmo of news
hunting indufatigiilily, ho has recently
scented mi American assistant in tho
person of Mr John .1 a Becket, the
author of many charming short stories
In the American magazines Mr. a
Becket was attached to Tho Evening
Worrl before his recent transfer to this
city
Tho Now York Sun's "bright young
man" Is Mr, Frank Marshall White, at,
one timo the literary editor of Life. Mr,
Whlto has an otllco on tho Strand, nnd
he, like tho others, Is frequently on the
Continent on special missions. Every
newspaper man, at least, knows his Sun
day letter, which iu many resects is the
brightest of all tho correspondence sent
from this side. Ho lias no regular assist
ant, for tho work demanded by The
Sun Is not of a character to require tt;
hut on Saturdays, when his letter is Iu
pieparatlon, ho often lias a half dozen
men scouring tho town under his d I lec
tion in search of facts.
The Now York Herald, long famous
for Its foreign nows, Is represented here
just now by two men, Messrs. James
Creelman 'nml T. B, Fielders. Mr.
Fielders enlno hero from tho Now York
Times a little more than two years ago,
Shortly afterward Mr. Creelman came
over to take charge of the Herald's Lon
don edition. Since then, however, ho
lias boon flying about all over Europe
nnd writing all manner of articles that
have had great sensational interest by
reason of tho topics treated. It Is worth
recalling that It was ho who secured tho
famous Interview with tho pope, and
more recently ho has published a set
controversy between himself and Count
Tolstoi nbout tho "Tho Kreutzer Son
aU." A short timo ago Mr. Creelman was
detailed to London, and he aud Fielders
aro co-oporating iu the work of sending
nows to America. There is another
American newspaper man hero connect
ed with Tho Herald iu tho capacity ot
editor of tho Sunday paper. This Is Mr.
Italpli B. Blumcufeld. Ho had been fot
a long timo tho city editor of Tho Tele
gram, Tho Herald's evening edition in
Now York. Under his management the
London paper has become very prosper
ous, and appears to be still moving on to
that respectful recognition which Eng
gllsh people aro bo slow to grant tc
American enterprises.
Among other young Americnn news
paper men now stationed iiero nro Mr.
II. J. W. Dam, correspondent for the
Now York Recorder; Mr. Louis Moore
representative of tho United Press; Mr.
Walter Knlen", chief of tho Associated
Press oflleo, and Mr. Horace Townsond.
formerly a Now York Tribune reporter.
Both Messrs. Dam and Townsund are
writing rather more for tho English
press than for tho American, and Dam
has brought himself somewhat to the
front by u play "Diamond Deano"
which was produced at tho Vaudeville
last March.
Nearly all theso men appear to regard
London ns a permanent residence, for
tho bachelors among them have fitted
up comfortable chambers (English for
apartments) and the married men have
taken long leases of houses or tints
Some of the bachelors, like Creelman
are babbling of marriage when the
leaves havo fallen. Nearly nil aro club
men, the famous Savage claiming their
first alleglc.ice, of course, nnd tho Nn
tionnl Liberal coming perhaps second.
FiiKiir.HicK R. Burton
Yollllif CIlTL') llivn.
Chicago, Sept. 17. Itev. Howard Mac
Queary, of Canton, O., whose Advanced
views have caused so much comment.
is but thirty-one years of nge. Sfnce
his suspension from tho ministry lie
has preached to large congregations in
every city he hns visited, and has had
mnnv requests to lecture and to write
foi
"'.
L-aziues. Mr. MacQueary's book,
Evolution of Man and Christian!-
had a remarkable sale for n tho
. work but a littlo over a year old.
Thomas Dixon, Jr., is another
lie
preacher who has attracted a great deal
of attention during tho past year. But,
although aggressive and strongly per
sonal, hesitating not to speak on tho
subjects of the day, to attack our sys
tem of politics and to condemn those In
high places he may deem guilty, he.
nevertheless, is thoroughly orthodox.
His church the Twenty-third Street
Baptist, Now York soon proved too
small to accommodate tho crowds that
flocked to hear the bold, magnetic
preacher. Tho beautiful little church
was closed, and the congregation had to
seek temporary quarters iu tho large As
sociation Hall of the Y. M. C. A. Ml.
Dlxou is n North Carolinian, thirty
years of ago, the son of a clergyman and
lias two brothers iu the ministry He is
a littlo over six feet tall, is wiry, smooth
shaven aud gaunt looking.
Probably the youngest bishop in the
Uulted States is the recently elected
assistant bishop of Louisiana, Rev. David
Sessums. He is practically bishop, inas
much ns tho physical Infirmities of Bishop
Galleher render him unfit for ceremonial
duties. Mr. Sessums was born at Hous
ton.Tex,, InlSJS. Ho was graduated from
the University of tho South, Sewauee,
Tenn,, with first honors, in his twenty
first year, and In 1832 he was admltt
to tho priesthood.
Tbuiniis llnlley Aldrlch.
Boston, Sept. 17. Mr. Thomas Bailey
Aldrlch is nt present in Switzerland,
traveling for recreation pure and sim
ple. He Is no longer editor of the At
lantic Monthly He hns a charming
home in Boston on Beacon Hill. Mr.
Aldrlch Is about fifty years old, although
he looks much younger. He has dark
brown hair powdered with gray, hazel
eyes nnd n heavy mustache. He is nn
eccentric dresser, inclining to tho Dick
ens style of male frippery, aud affects
stunning trousers, gay plaid silk waist
coats, Norfolk jackets and red ties.
Ho Is a brilliant aud entertaining con
versationist. His English is most care
fully selected, ami he speaks slowly and
with great precision. He is said to be
the most delightful host imaginable, and
whilo lie has 110 penchant for nthletics,
he is interested in topics that concern
women and is a great fnvoritoof the fair
sex EviIbiis .Mix,
HIS MISTAKE.
Thrrit Is Much n TIiImk iis ii I'linny
Mini
Mi'hiK Ton Pun ll).
Tlio early ilier was out watering M
grass when the funny man camu along and
stepped on the hone.
The early riser turned around to see
what had shut on the water so suddenly,
itmllliu funny man laughed at him.
"Get off that liose.l" exclaimed the early
riser,
"Oh, don't mind me," said tho funny
man "Oo on and water your grass."
'I'll en he noticed that the no.rlu was care
lessly pointed Iu Ills direction.
"I lore! Point that tho othur way." he
cried
Tho early riser glanced down nt the noz
rlu and Ills face lit up with pleasure.
"Amusing to shut ol n man's water,
Isn't Itr" he asked
"But, my dear sir," expostulated the
funny man, "I didn't"
"It's Intensely funny," said tho early
riser, "you'd better get off that hose."
"But I can't," said the funny man,
"Don't you see the nozzle's pointed right at
me, and If I do"
"Oh, well, I'm In no hurry," Interrupted
the early riser "If you enjoy It 1 don't
know that I have any reason to object."
Hu sat down on the railing surrounding
his grass plat and rested the nozzle on his
knee, still keeping it pointed toward the
funny man.
"I say," said the latter, "It you'll turn
that the other way I'll get olT."
"Oh, I wouldn't put you to so much
trouble," snld the early riser. "Enjoy
yoursolf,"
The early riser held the nozzle between
his knees while hu took out a cigar and lit
it. The funny man watched him pull It
for a moment. Then hu saldt
"See here, old man, my leg's cottlng
HtllT."
"Why don't you shift legs?" asked the
early riser disinterestedly.
The funny man tried It, made a slip, nnd
tho stream almost reached him before he
could Ket his foot on the hose iikuIii. The
early riser chuckled.
"Say, I'll break your headl" cried the
funny man excitedly,
"All right," returned tho early riser
carelessly. "But be careful or you may
slip olT the lioiu again,"
The funny man ulared nt the early riser
a moment and then said:
"If I were as mean as you are I'd go into
thu pawnbrokers' business."
"If I wero as funny us you aru," said the
early riser as hu leisurely pulled his cl'ar,
"I'd hire out to a burle.xipio company."
The funny man tried to walk along the
hose to gut farther away from the nozzle,
but thu water spurted out a little with
each step nnd hu stopped. Then he go
desperate, stepped olT, and started to run.
Thu stream caught him in the middle of
thu back.
When hu got out of raugu he turned nnd
shook his fist at thu Impassive early riser
and made some terrible threats.
And the early riser muttered ns hu began
watering thu grass again:
"Funny that n funny man can't take a
Jokuon himself." Chicago Tribune
That ,Vn- All.
It seems that thu word "gentleman" In
subject, iu one country at least, to the
misconceptions so frequently attendant on
the hardly used term "lady." The author
of "A Colonial Tramp" gives the follow
ing Instance of such an absurd and mis
taken phrasing:
When we wero at Port Said, Iu passing
down one of the side streets we missed our
little guldu for u moment, and as he had
our parcels wo looked round to see if he
had not run oil with them. Upon that we
became aware of a dark, evil looking and
dirty half caste of some kind, culling him
nbout at an alley corner. Wo turned to
Klve assistance to our little friend, and the
bully left off and shuffled once more Into
shadow.
"Is thai your father?" I asked, guessing
at the fact for thu reason that tho boy had
not resisted very much, and now shook
himself together without olTcriug any ex
planation. "My fader No, sar," with great scorn.
"He ono dirty thief gentleman wauling
the parcels, that's all."
"Oh. that's all, Is It?"
"Yes, sar, he gentleman who waits nt
dark corners when Englishman pass at
night and stab." Youth's Companion.
Wlllinin llolluri'il.
A woman with n bundle iu a shawl strap
accosted a policeman in Union Square park
the other day with the announcement that
her husband was lost. They were coming
down town from tho depot and had got off
at Fourteenth street by mistake, nnd while
he was looking around for his bearings he
bad wandered away. The officer suggested
that she go to a hotel, but after thinking it
over for awhile she replied:
"Vn I mifi&a I'll stnv rlc?hr. Iiprn for
awhile longer. I'm expecting to hear him
holler every mlnit."
"Will he call to you?"
"1 think ho will. There he goes uow;
that's William's bazoo."
Down toward Fifth avenue was heard a
noise which seemed to bun sort of combi
nation of fog horn aud boiler explosion,
nnd the woman picked up her bundle and
continued:
"That's William, and 1 can go straight
to him. Thnt's tho way he stauds In our
back door aud calls up the hired man from
the back lot, only he's a little scan and
nln't hollerin only about half as loud us
usual." New York Evening World.
Not Exactly Approachable.
"Do you know General Jenkins?" said
ono newspaper mau to auother
"Oh, yes."
"Is he nn easy man to npproach?"
"Well, I should say not. Ho lives nbout
six miles out, of town over ono of the worst
roads you ever saw." Washington Star.
The I'lrst 3Iestnre from Mars.
Snodgruss Our experimenters have nt
last succeeded in attracting the nttention
of the people luhnbltlng Mars.
Snivel)' Indeed? Has auy message
passed lietweun that planet nnd the earth?
Suodgrass Yes; they wanted to know
what the score was, New York Sun.
Ills Trouble,
The Squash What's
matter with
you?
The Watermelon Too
melon. Life.
much water
s!sfML azrjC 1
the
NEW
HtffnAftfeGAIWiY-
a bk9 flAiuiTn mwuti.njuiH.rrm.uj 1 1 r rnmi " n
Formerly of HUFFMAN & RICHTER. 1039 o STREET.
NEW LOCHTION,
Fret Work, Screens and Panels
CABINET WORK OF ALL KINDS TO ORDER.
Full Line of 7V A N T IE LS Always in Stock,
ARE SHOWN IN Ol'R NEW WaREROO.MS.
NEBRASKA CABINET WORKS,
COUNTERS AND WALL CASES. 1224-28 M Street.
Opened Jan, 1, 'Dl,
Alt Improvements
The Lincoln,
TI'KMH-f-2 Mi TO .(0.
be latter price Includes Hath.
First-Class in Every Respect!
llllllIH'tK, lIllIlM ami Itl't'CptlollH.
We lire especially well piepureil to enter
tain luriruor hiiuiII uulheriiiKS nt lliiiuiuetK,
Halls, Iteceptloiis, Kto. Itntes ami full Infor
mation cheui Cully kIvcii at thootllee.
for I r ml Dili sim.
SIIKAIW.V Markki
FAST MAIL ROUTE !
2 DAILY TRAINS 2
TO-
Atchlson, Leavenworth, St. Joseph, Kansas
Cltv, St. Louis niul nil Points South,
East nnd West.
The direct line to Ft. Scott, Parsons
Wichita, Hutchinson and all p-hicipal
points in Kansas.
The only road to the Great Hot Springs
of Arkansas. Pullman Sleepers ata Free
Reclining Chair Cars on all trains.
J. E. R. MILLAR, R V. R. MILLAR,
City Ticket A gt Gsi'l gmt
SIDEV7ALK AND BUILDING
gB
IPP
J. a.
La. MEYER,
Notary Public and Real Estate Dealer in Glty and Farm Property
AGENT
y''-'HHBjBBJMflBJpjHBAaSflBsjBa BMwisssTSBBW XassISwS
d BHsvSsasBVSstePjSbsnUasi jBBPaBtBSsBBBW
J'(Z3EBBjall3BHBBAMJHSjBMjH
bbWbbHPbJPJHPBHHWHBHI-S
North German-Lloyd Steamship Co.,
Hamburg-American Packet Co., and Baltic Lines.
AUo Railroad Agent for the different Companies East and West.
Southampton, Havre, Hamburg, Stetten, London, Paris, Norway, Plymouth, lhcincn,
Sweeten, and any point In Europe.
Post Orders nnd Foreign Exchange Issued to nil prominent points In Europe.
Having liuuo facilities east with the liltfifest Hunks nnd r-uvjiujs Institutions, I am pro
pared to make all kimU of Loans on rirst Ileal Kstnte Mortiriuteo, Cltv or I'aiiu 1'ioperty,
from 1 toS yeais, at the lowest lntcic.t. I also ileal Iu fcliool Bonds, State, County unit City
Warrants, also Iu suite, County ami City Ccrtltled Claims, ami will always pay the blithest
market price. Cull ami see mu or Conespoml with me.
L. MEYER, 10S
GOODS.
ilEB
EffQhd-QfilKaP
Nebraska's Leading Hotel,
THE MURRAY
for. Ilih and Harney Hts,,
02w.Z..
x-T-nxa.
STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS
All Modern Improvements nnd
Conveniences.
SILL0WAY, Pro-rletor.
IBA HIQBY, Principal Clerk
RICK
AND-
VITRIFIED PAVERS
bugkstaff
KOH THE
North Tenth Street.
'SyBJP-BBBTBBBBBSBB'as?'
jSBBBBBSattBi'anfaf ll IbB
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-"'fti inn in r -nils llaVsWajaTaat-atti'iiii-ilii mlt'iir' 'lVhKirr rti iiTl.
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rj&&ji'jafo-kiuki ,.