The frontier. (O'Neill City, Holt County, Neb.) 1880-1965, August 06, 1942, Image 4

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    A. L. MILLER
For Congress
A Businessman.
A Farm and Stock
Owner.
A member of Legisla
ture for two years.
Until July 1 this year
had charge of issuing
Birth Certificates and
other Health Activi
in the State.
I promise to work for
you full time in an
honest and sincere
manner.
YOUR VOTE WILL
BE APPRECIATED
clxthiMas
Emerson E. Wakefield
Candidate For
State Legislature
Resident of 28th District for more than 25 years
YOUR SUPPORT APPRECIATED
1
Wm. L. Brady
Non-Political Candidate For
LEGISLATURE
28th District
Keya Paha, Rock,
Boyd and Holt
Counties
Primary Election
Tues., Aug. 11
Your vote and sup
port appreciated.
Born and lived 48
years on farm near
Dorsey, Holt County,
and still operate the
farm.
Married, and has five children. Traveled over
entire state six years in insurance work. Not
indebted to anyone financially or otherwise. . .
Primary Election August 11, 1942
VOTE FOR
T. L. - Tommy - McDonald
Democratic Candidate for
COUNTY TREASURER
LIFELONG RESIDENT — DEPENDABLE _ QUALIFIED
Wifi Appreciate Your Vote and Support
---__
SAM DIEDRICHS
«
Lawyer
and
Rancher
DEMOCRAT
Serving Eighth Year
as County Attorney
at North Platte
Radio Talks, KMMJ, Inc.,
for Sam Diedrichs
August 8 7:05 p. m.
August 10 6:45 a. m.
August 11 8:10 a. m.
FOR CONGRESS
4TH DISTRICT
WANTED
3,000 Tons of New Rye Straw
W. F. PARROTT
Buyer and Shipper of Hay and Straw
Stein’s Property PHONE 206 O’Neill, Nebr.
The Frontier
J. jtL Cronin, Editor and Owner
Sintered at the postofTice at
JNeill. Nebraska, as Second
Class Matter.
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ids 10c per line, first insertion,
tubsequent insertions. 5c per line
briefl^Tstated
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Sauser
spent Wednesday in Norfolk.
Miss Margaret Johnson of
Butte is visiting friends here this
week.
Billy McDonough and Joe Ryan
attended the Burwell rodeo on
Wednesday.
Mrs. Anna McCartney spent
Tuesday and Wednesday in Butte
visiting friends.
Mr. and Mrs. William Dailey
and family spent Sunday with
relatives at Norden.
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Sherbahan
spent Saturday and Sunday in
Wayne visiting relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Bergstrom
took John A. Grunke to the state
penitentiary Saturday.
Circle A. B. of the Methodist
church met at the home of Mrs.
Ted MsElhaney Wednesday after
noon.
liood health is one or our great-1
est blessings. Good teeth make
way for good health, so why neg
lect your teeth? Have them
looked after properly every six
months.—Dr. Fisher, Dentist. 13
Margaret Clauson just returned
from Sioux Falls, where she com
pleted her training in giving Cold
Ray permament waves.—Adv.
Mrs. Norman Kirschman un
derwent a major operation at a
Grand Island hospital last Wed
nesday. Her condition is fair.
Mrs. Estella Shaughnessy went
to Wayne Tuesday to visit her
daughter and family for a few
days.
Corp. Cecil Grenier returned
to Sacremento, Cal., Wednesday.
Corporal Grenier was called home
by the serious illness of his
mother, Mr. E. G. Grenier, who
is at the home of her son, Frank
and family.
Mrs. Harold Connors has re
ceived word from her husband,
Pvt. Connors that he was trans
ferred from Camp Roberts, Calif.,
to Fort Lewis, Wash., last week.
Miss Meta M. Martin visited at
Neligh Sunday at the homes of
O. O. Templin and Wm. Haynes.
Mrs. Templin is her sister, Mrs.
Haynee is her niece.
Major T. E. Gillaspie of the
State Headquarters of Selective
Service, of Lincoln, was at the
O'Neill Draft Board office Tues
day on business.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Davidson
attended the rodeo at Burwell to
day.
Mrs. Clifton Kurtz returned to
her home in Kansas City, Mo.,
last Friday, after visiting at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Kurtz
and family for a week.
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Marshall,
Mr. and Mrs. Art Dexter and Mr.
and Mrs. Francis Murphy attend
ed the Burwdl rodeo today.
Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Connelly
and daughter, Mary Ann, visited
relatives at Creighton Sunday.
Notice
DR. A. E. GADBOIS
Eye, Ear, and Nose Special
ist, will make his regular
visit at Dr. Carter's office in
O'NEILL
Friday, August 14th
Glasses Fitted
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Heriford re
ceived a cablegram from their
son, Pvt. Bennett Heriford, who
is a baker in the medical corps
of the U. S. Army, that he had
arrived in Honolulu.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Schulz and
son, Luther, spent Sunday at
Norfolk and Pierce visiting rel
atives.
Blanche Gibson went to Oma
ha today, where she plans on se
curing employment.
Mrs. Robert Brittell entertain
ed the Last Minute bridge club
at her home Wednesday after
noon. Mrs. Wm. Bruegman won
high score, Mrs George Mitchell
second and Mrs. Frank Clements
third.
Dinner will be served at the
Country Club on Sunday, August
9, at 6:30 p. m.
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Verzal and
son, Jerry, of Wayne, and Mrs.
Ed Quinn of O’Neill attended the
Burwell rodeo today. *
THE DAYS OF LONG AGO
(Continued from Page 1)
tinued camping in the cupola un
til around 7 o’clock, when he
came down and said a shower
would soon be upon us, and so it
was. As nice a shower as one
would wish to see, but it appears
to have been a general rain from
the Black Hills to Omaha. Pub
lie opinion i3 greatly divided up
on the question of whether or
not Melbourne was responsible
for the shower. In fact that has
been the all-absorbing topic of
conversation since the gentleman
arrived in the city. The character
of Tuesday’s rain is a point that
argues strongly in Melbourne's
favor. It came with very little
thunder and lightning and no
wind, something that is very un
usual in this country during the
summer months. The clouds or
iginally came lazily drifting from
the northwest in broken masses,
resembling whitecaps on a ruf
fled sea and had no indication
whatever of rain. About 1 o’clock
Tuesday they settled back again
in the north and by 8 o’clock the
entire sky was of a leaden hue
and a gentle rain began falling
which continued falling until the
gauges measured a little over an
inch. We got the rain, but the
rainmaker got no money, as it
came several hours after his con
tract expired.
The Methodist Church
V. C. Wright, Minister
Church school 10: a. m., H. B.
Burch, superintendent.
Public worship 11:00 a. m.
Special music by the choir and
sermon by the pastor.
Youth Fellowship 7:00 p. m.
Women’s Society of Christian
j Service in the church parlors
Thursday afternoon, August 13.
I The topic for study will be “The
Church.”
The pastor and people of the
Methodist church are deeply
appreciative of the friends who
have so generously helped our
Youth Fellowship in their scrap
drive. The help given has been
a splendid patriotic gesture and
material assistance to a worthy
can*,
iliSSIilll*i
ABOVE ALL
VICTORY
IN carrying on our business of banking, there
is one consideration that dominates all
others ... Victory. The vital war role of
America’s banks — how they are helping to
finance the war, assure adequate food sup
plies, accelerate war production and keep
the economic machine on an even keel—will
be discussed in this new series of advertise
ments entitled "Banks and the War.” Our
next message will be on a subject of intense
personal interest to everyone — Defense
Bonds. Watch for it.
O’NEILL NATIONAL BANK
O’NEILL, NEBRASKA
Member hedera] IVpo.it Insurance Corporation
Pelfnattttif /ihtfutj
NO HEAT* NO MACHINES
At lajtt The miracle permanent, bringing
you thrilling new hair beauty with no
heat, no machines.
★ BETTER HAIR CONDITIONI COLD
RAY I otions flow through your hair, leave
it whisper-soft. ★ IDEAL COMFORT! No
heat, no machines, no stretching. Tested
safety, for your peace-of-mind.
★ SOFTER, STRONGER CURLS I Abun
dant, luscious curls, even along the neck
line. Even on hair hard to wave with
heart ★ COMPLETE CONVENIENCEI
COLD RAY takes no longer than an
ordinary heat wave, leaves your hair
•asy to style for any occasion.
Cell for as Appefsfsiesf
Margaret’s Beauty Salon
PHONE 102 O'NEILL, NEBR.
A WEEK OF THE WAR
Army
The nine army corps areas were
reorganized and renamed “Ser
vice Commands.” The organ
ization will further decentralize
the operation of services of sup
ply activity and eliminate dupli
cating facilities, War Secretary
Stimson said 28,000 Jaundice cases
developed among army personnel
in the U. S. and abroad between
January 1 and July 4, apparently
due to the use of Yellow Fever
vaccine. Sixty-two deaths re
sulted. “There has been a
change in the form of Yellow
Fever vaccine now used which the
Surgeon General thinks will
eliminate the whole trouble,”
Mr. Stimson said. Director Hobby
of the Women’s Army Auxiliary
Corps said 20 companies of 150
women each will be 'trained by
the end of this year and 25,000
women will be trained by April,
1943.
Scrap Salvage Campaign
| President Roosevelt reported
the recent Scrap Rubber Collect
ion Drive added 454,000 tons to
the government’s stockpile—ex
clusive of rubber in small piles
still at service stations and junk
dealers. WPB Chairman Nel
son asked state and local govern
ments to lend their trucks and
workers to local salvage commit
tees to help transport scrap mater
ial collections before winter sets
in. To keep steel furnaces going
at full capacity, more than 750,
000 freight cars will be required
ta carry scrap iron and steel, most
of which must be moved by
trucks to rail points.
The WPB extended the Tin
Can Salvage Program to 104
cities in addition to 36 metropoli
tan areas previously announced,
because de-tinning plant capacity
requirements have been increas
ed from 250,660 to 400.000 ton*.
Tht Board said the government
will requisition fro
•rs all useless
those that cannot be repaired
on a practical basis—to maintain
the present peak movement of
automobile scrap to mills. Gn the
basis of a questionaire to 350
firms, the Board estimated 100
million pounds of essential chem
icals could be realized in the next
18 months if manufacturers of
war equipment began now to re
cover wasted spray paints.
Taxation And Profits
The House passed and sent to
the Senate the War Revenue Bill,
estimated to yield about $6,300
million, providing a 45 percent
normal and surtax income rate
on corporations and a 90 percent
excess profits tax. Treasurery
Secretary Morgenthau, however,
said a tax program of less than
$8,700 million of additional reven
ue would be inadequate. He rec
ommended removal of these
“Special Privileges;” tax ex
emption for state and municipal
securities, exemption from tax
ation of 27 Vis percent of income
from oil wells and mines, and
separate income tax returns by
married couples.
The House Naval Affairs Com
mittee, after investigating 40,000
contracts, said “95 percent of the
war contractors are doing an
honest and effective job and re
ceiving only fair and reasonable
profits,” the average being 8 per
cent.
Jack Carroll was an O’Neill vis
itor from Atkinson Tuesday eve.
California Peaches $ 1 29
Large Crates.X
Carload of Fancy No. 1 Defuzzed
California Alberta Peaches
POPULAR SIZES
This carload will be here either
August 7th or 8th
They are part green and will keep four
or five days for canning. Buy ’em now.
Large Crates $1.29
Outlaw Grocery
CLARENCE M. DAVIS...
For
Railway
Commission
REPUBLICAN TICKET
fir
Qualified—25 Years
Active Law Practice
The Railway Commission func
tions much like a court and legal
experience is desirable.
FARMER WITHERS
For
State Senator
28th District
Borri' and raised in Holt county
16 miles south of Atkinson. Agri
culture and its people hold his
interest, as he is dependent upon
them for a livlihood. More famil
iar with conditions in 28th Dist
rict than any other candidate.
NON-POLITICAL BALLOT
PRIMARY AUG. 11. 1942
Your Vote and Support Will Be
Appreciated
EARL RASDAL
For
CONGRESS
(4th District)
REPUBLICAN
PRIMARIES AUG. 11
RASDAL is a success
ful businessman who
wants to lend his abil
ity toward making the
kind of legislation the
country needs for pro
gress.
RASBAL was born in Nebraska and has lived
here all his life, and he knows the problems of
the state and district Through EXPERIENCE.
RASDAL ha* visited every town in the dist
rict during the past two months, meeting as
many people as possible, getting their ideas on
the future needs of the district in legislation.
RASDAL is experienced in legislative proced
ure — ask anyone who served with hiih in the
state legislature — and he has made political
science and government a study and a hobby.
RASDAL is capable of handling the job—ask
anyone who knows him or has worked with him
in state and community affairs.
RASDAL is young enough to be physically
and mentally alert and active, and is old enough
to exercise good judgment.
RASDAL has made no commitments but has
promised the district to give serious consider
ation to every subject and to work with all he
has, with honesty and fearlessness, to inaugur
ate the dictates of his own conscience.
RASDAL GETS THINGS DONE. ELECT
HIM TO CONGRESS.