The frontier. (O'Neill City, Holt County, Neb.) 1880-1965, March 06, 1941, Image 2

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    Household News
IWhzMwt-.
THIS PUDDING FAIRLY SHOUTS 'TRY ME!’
(See Recipes Below)
ADD ONE CUP OF IMAGINATION
Once upon a time a friend told
me that to her the addition of "one
cup of imagina- ✓—
tlon WBI the (MMOWKHI) } I
most important bo* lun<m .Map*[ /
ingredient that ^
could be used in
any recipe. So
whole heartedly
do I agree with
her that today I
want to give you
a number of recipes to which that
ingredient, imagination, has been
added. In fact, so successfully has
this been done that each of these
recipes is different, yet each is de
licious — each fairly shouts "Try
met”
These recipes, moreover, have
been chosen as luncheon favorites
because, of all of the meals of the
day, the family luncheon some way
seems to be most neglected.
Take the baked apricot and tapi
oca pudding for example; have you
ever before thought of serving a cof
fee sauce with such a pudding? Yet
the blend of flavors vwhich results
from combining this particular pud
ding with this particular sauce is
really delicious—long to be remem
bered.
Sausage Stand-Up.
(Serves 4 to 8)
1 8-ounce package spaghetti (broken
small)
1 pound breakfast sausages
44 cup minced onion
1 clove garlic (minced)
4 tablespoons parsley .(finely
chopped)
1 can tomato paste (8-ounce)
1 cup water
144 teaspoons salt
44 teaspoon pepper
44 teaspoon sugar
44 cup grated cheese
Cook broken spaghetti in boiling
water (6 cups) (1 teaspoon salt per
quart water; un
til tender, about
20 minutes, then
drain. Place sau
sages in skillet,
add y« cup of wa
ter and cook until nicely browned,
about 15 minutes. Saute onion, gar
lic, and parsley in sausage fat for
5 minutes, until onions are yellow
and transparent. Remove from fat
and combine with tomato paste and
seasonings. Combine spaghetti with
tomato sauce and turn into buttered
casserole. Tuck sausages into spa
ghetti in upright position, so that
just the end of each sausage shows.
Sprinkle grated cheese over top and
bake in moderate oven (350 degrees
Fahrenheit) for 20 minutes.
Baked Apricot and Tapioca Pudding
. (Serves 8 to 8)
hi cup pearl tapioca
Vfc cup evaporated apr.'Cdts or
i 2 cups canned apricot?
hi cup sugar
| y« teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons lemon juice
3 cups warm water
1 tablespoon butter
Soak pearl tapioca in cold water,
to cover, for one hour. Wash apri
cots and place in a well-greased 1V4
quart heat-resistant glass casserole.
Add sugar, salt, lemon juice and
warm water. Drain tapioca; stir it
into the fruit mixture in casserole
and cot with bits of butter. Cover
the dish and bake in a moderate
oven (350 degrees Fahrenheit) for
1 hour or until the tapioca pearls
are translucent. Cool, top with
whipped cream, if desired, and
serve with coffee sauce.
Coffee Sauce.
hi cup sugar
lVi tablespoons cornstarch
ft teaspoon salt
1 cup hot coffee, regular strength
2 tablespoons butter
y« teaspoon nutmeg, if desired.
Blend sugar, cornstarch and salt
in the upper part of a 1-quart heat
resistant glass double boiler. Add
coffee and cook until it thickens,
stirring constantly. Blend in butter
and nutmeg. Cool and serve with
apricot and tapioca pudding.
Hot Dogs in Blankets.
When baking fresh yeast rolls,
wrap strips of the dough around
wieners, allowing the ends to stick
out of their dough blanket. Give
the dough time to double in bulk and
bake as usual. These hot dogs in
blankets should be served piping
hot.
My Style Spaghetti.
(Serves 5 to 6)
Vi cup olive oil
1 small onion, chopped
1 green pepper, seeded and chopped
1 pound ground beef
lVi teaspoons salt
1 cup tomato puree
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauci
Vi cup grated cheese
1 cup canned com
Vi package spaghetti, cooked
Heat olive oil in frying pan and
add onion, green pepper and ground
beef. Fry until brown and then add
the salt, tomato puree, and Worces
tershire sauce. Stir in the grated
cheese together with the com and
cooked spaghetti. Place in buttered
baking casserole and bake in a mod
erate oven (350 degrees Fahrenheit)
for approximately 40 minutes.
Honey All-Bran Spice Cookies.
(Makes 2Vi dozen cookies)
Vi cup shortening
Vi cup honey
Vi cup sugar
1 egg
1 cup All-Bran
1 Vi cups flour
Vi teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
Vi teaspoon soda
Vi teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup seedless raisins
Blend shortening, sugar and honey
thoroughly. Add egg and beat un
til creamy. Add ,
bran. Sift flour;
once before meas- j
uring. Add salt, j
baking powder, j
soda, cloves and
cinnamon. Com
bine with raisins.
Add to flrst mix
ture and beat
well. Drop dough
by teaspoons on lightly greased bak
ing sheet about 2to inches apart.
Bake in moderate oven (350 degrees
Fahrenheit) about 12 to 15 minutes.
Cheese Soup With Rice
(Serves 5)
1 cup cooked carrot (very finely
diced)
4 cups milk
1 tablespoon chopped onion
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons flour
1 cup grated cheese
2 tablespoons chopped pimiento
2 egg yolks
1 teaspoon salt
y« teaspoon white pepper
to cup rice (cooked)
Add carrot and onion to milk and
scald. Melt butter in saucepan, add
flour and blend to a smooth paste.
Add milk gradually to flour mix
ture, stirring all the time. Add
cheese, salt and pepper, stirring un
til cheese is melted. Pour over
well-beaten egg yolks, stirring con
stantly. Serve at once with spoon
ful of hot cooked rice.
Mexican Spaghetti.
(Serves 8 to 10)
Vi pound spaghetti
1 can peas (No. 2)
Vi pound raw ham (ground)
Vi pound American cheese (grated)
1 can tomatoes (No. 2)
Vi cup green pepper (cut fine)
1 tablespoon pimiento (cut fine)
2 tablespoons butter (melted)
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon salt
Vi teaspoon pepper
Bacon strips
Cook the spaghetti in boiling, salt
ed water. Drain. In a baking dish
arrange layers of spaghetti, peas,
ground ham and cheese and com
bine tomatoes, green pepper, pimi
ento, butter, and seasonings. Pour
over the spaghetti. Cover with grat
ed cheese and top with bacon strips.
Bake in a moderate oven (350 de
grees Fahrenheit) for one hour.
Refrigerator Hamburgers.
(Serves 5)
1 pound hamburger
2 tablespoons finely minced onion
Vi cup chopped green pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
1 tablespoon horseradish
Mix all ingredients together, and
s>'ape into a roll 2V4 inches in diam
eter. Let stand in the refrigerator
several hours or over night. When
ready to use, cut in slices Vi inches
thick and fry or broil as for regu
lar hamburgers.
(Released by Western Newspaper Union.)
By VIRGINIA VALE
(Released by Western Newspaper Union.)
IF RALPH MURPHY, Para
mount director, needed to
make a little extra money he
could write a book entitled
“Ten Lessons on How to
Catch a Man” and the shekels
would roll in.
Here’s what he has to say
about it. (He’s a graduate ol
Syracuse university, has been
a stage and motion picture actor,
producer and director for years, so
he’s qualified to talk.)
“I have three girls in 'Las Vegas
Nights.’ Each would use a differ
ent technique. Each
technique would re
quire eight reels to
fold. So—I let Con
stance Moore get
her man with the di
rect-approach tech
nique. I give Vir
ginia Dale a man
before the picture
starts, and I leave
Lillian Cornell out
on a limb with nary
Constance a ma,e ln a,gnt
Moore "The allure tech'
nique is used by a
woman conscious of the fact that
she has an enormous amount of
feminine appeal for men—a screen
example would be Hedy Lamarr.
Flattery is used by women ranging
from the baby-talk girls to the moth
ering type. There’s the girl who
gives the impression that she’s help
less; men want to stand between
her and the world—Bonnie Baker’s
an example.
"There’s the girl who uses the di
rect approach; spots the man she
wants and makes no
bones about it; she's !
a good sport, a play- i
mate, and picks a
man with the same
characteristics. Bar
bara Stanwyck’s a
screen example. And
the coquette, whose
eyes say ‘if you
chase me I’ll run—
but not too far.’ Like I
Virginia Dale on the timm
BCreen Virginia Dale
“Then there's the
one who is not brilliant and not
dull, not beautiful and not homely;
every girl asks ‘What’s she got?’
The answer is ‘She's got the man
that a lot of other girls wanted.’ ”
-*
Some other girl may have Errol
Flynn for a husband now; Olivia de
Haviland’s married him five times
—on the screen—and when she fin
ished "Santa Fe Trail” she fled to
the equally ardent arms of James
Cagney, in “Strawberry Blonde.”
She was a little dubious about it;
after ail, Cagney’s had a bad movie
reputation where women were con
cerned since he squashed that
grapefruit in a lady’s face. But
Olivia Is safe in this one—he’s cast
as a belligerent dentist who gets into
plenty of fights, but all with men.
-*
Twenty-four of the show girls in
“Ziegfeld Girl" voted for their fa
vorite movie actress the other day.
Vivian Leigh got eight votes, and
Bette Davis and Greta Garbo each
got five. But—Judy Garland, Lana
Turner and Hedy Lamarr couldn’t
be voted for. They’re in the picture.
-*
Billy the Kid has finally joined the
side of law and order. It happened
recently near Tucson, Ariz., where
Robert Taylor was made a deputy
sheriff of Pima county. Taylor plays
the fast-shooting desperado of the
1870s in Metro's picture. “Billy the
Kid,” which was on location in the
I Southwest at the time Taylor took
I over his duties.
They were shooting scenes on the
Double U ranch in Pima county
when Sheriff Ed Echols paid the
tioupc a visit and pinned a shiny
new badge on the star's shirt.
My
-7iv
Burgess Meredith rarely wears a
hat, but he's exceptionally well pro
vided with places to hang one. At
present he has four homes. (1) His
200-year-old farmhouse in Rockland
county. N. Y. (2) Jimmy Stewart's
oachelor establishment in Brent
wood, where he has stayed on his
previous Hollywood sojourns. (3)
The house in West Los Angeles
which belongs to Wayne Morris,
which he and Franchot Tone rent;
j it’s known as Annex No. 1 to Stew
art's abode. (4) A small beach
hous* which he rented at Santa
Monica, called Annex No. 2—he took
it with the idea of week-ending
j there, but so far has been so busy
that he's hardly seen it. But he
has hopes, now that he’s completing
his work in United Artists’ ‘‘That
i Uncertain Feeling.”
-*
ODDS AMD ENDS—Mr. and Mrs.
Rober[ Hurt in Honolulu listened to
i radio's "Hilltop House” last year, and
| liked the story and its star, Bess John
son, so rnueh that they named their
home for the serial. Recently Miss
Johnson learned that all her Hawaiian
Islands mail is being dclii ered to the
Harts! . . . For the betterment of
iMtin-Arnerican relations, Harks John
son and a!l\ Butterworlh are mak
ing a ten-thousand-mile junket to
Mexico ( its, i uerta Rico and Htitana,
for three “1 os Hop broadcasts . . .
“The Ini form" ends Cll:rk Gable’s
tuo-inonths’ mention and brings Rosa
lind Rus.cll bock to the Metro lots.
I
Good Posture
Help to Both
Body and Mind
By DR. JAMES W. BARTON
(Released by Western Newspaper Union.)
I SPEAK often about good
posture—erect position of
the body whether standing or
sitting—because of its value
both physical
and mental. TODAY’S
The erect car- u r AI T U
riage of the HtflLI"
body means COLUMN
that the shoul- L . ■■
ders are well back and the
chest well forward, giving the
lungs plenty of room to ex
pand, and preventing any
crowding or pressure on the
heart. With the lungs draw
ing in the pure air and breath
ing out the impure air, the
blood, pumped by a heart free
from pressure, will carry
more nourishment to and
more wastes from every cell
in the body.
The erect position calls also for a
drawing in (or backwards) of the
abdomen and tne de
velopment of the ab
dominal muscles by
keeping the abdo
men drawn in or
back holds the ab
dominal organs up
in their proper posi
tions, thus aiding di
gestion and prevent
ing constipation.
Dr. Philip Lewin,
New York, in Clini
Dr. Barton cal Medicine ana
Surgery, gives 10
commandments of good posture.
1. Stand tall.
2. Sit tall.
3. Walk tall and “chesty,” with
weight of the body on the balls or
front part of the feet.
4. Draw in the abdomen, pulling
it backwards and upwards.
5. Keep the shoulders high and
square.
6. Pull the chin downward toward
the collar button.
7. Flatten the hollow of the back
by rolling the hip bones downward
and backward.
8. Separate the shoulders from the
hips as far as possible. Do this
more by drawing hips down than by
raising shoulders.
9. Lie tall and flat. (Don't overdo
this as having elbows and knees
very slightly bent helps to relax the
body and so invites sleep).
10. Think tall.
• • •
What’s to Be Done
About Dandruff?
DERHAPS you have been reading
* about various cures for dandruff
or have tried some without obtain
ing a cure. That dandruff is a fore
runner or cause of loss of hair is
not true, according to many research
workers.
The federal trade commission of
the United States, after an investiga
tion of dandruff, states that there is
no proof that dandruff is due to any
infection. In Public Health Reports,
Washington. D. C., Dr. C. W. Em
mons states that while a small
yeastlike organism is always pres
ent in the dry or greasy scales of
dandruff.
This little organism is known as
the “bottle bacillus” and many In
vestigators have tried in vain to
cause it to grow as other tiny or
ganisms are made to grow. Even
those research workers who have
been successful in growing this or
ganism admit that they have not
been able to cause dandruff in any
scalps by inoculation with it.
Instead of trying to infect a nor
mal scalp and thus perhaps cause
dandruff, it was decided to inocu
late an individual who already had
dandruff and to measure whether
this inoculation caused any increase
in the time required to develop dan
druff in places where dandruff was
extensive as compared with places
in which dandruff was absent or
scant The dandruff did not appear
any sooner in the inoculated spots
than in the other spots.
This proves, that, with our pres
ent knowledge at least, dandruff is
not likely due to the organism that
hitherto has been blamed for it.
The above information does not
mean that something should not be
done about dandruff. Until the cause
is found, the frequent use of soap
and water on the scalp, or the use
of various proprietary preparations
should be continued. The cleansing
and rubbing of the scalp in itself is
helpful in that it not only loosens
and removes scales but stimulates
the circulation of the blood in the
scalp.
* • •
QUESTION BOX
Q-—Could heavy smoking (now
discontinued) have any direct con
nection with my feeling sure I have
, heart disease?
A.—It is not likely that your heart
was permanently damaged by smok
ing. Symptoms look more like gall
bladder disturbance. However, an
examination by your physician will
show whether or not symptoms are
doe to a heart condition.
Q—How can I stop smoking?
A.—Eating candy before smoking
ind engaging in sports will help.
, • I
■ws f>*m
WoHM>
Objecting
Mother—Baby’s crying because
he’s getting his first teeth.
Little Mary—What’s the mat
ter? Doesn’t he want them?
Next Best
“Why did they hang that pic
ture?”
“Because they couldn’t find the
artist.”
Quite Obvious
“Isn't that a new frock you've on?"
"Yes; I got it for a ridiculous figure.”
"Oh, I can see that!"
Grounds for Suspicions
“I’ve searched high and low for
the furniture cream recipe your
mother gave me—”
“Here!” »aid her husband, put
ting down his spoon, “where did
you get the recipe for this soup?”
The rain rains mostly upon the
just. The unjust keep borrowing
his umbrella.
Respect Due
Going to the office with Brown every
morning, Smith noticed that he raised
his hat to Dr. Blunt, the family doctor,
whom they met on his rounds.
“tf’hy do you raise your hat?" asked
Smith.
“Because my wife does what he tells
her," replied Brown.
That Was Easy
With his usual long-windedness,
the bore was describing one of his
hair-breadth escapes.
“There was I,”.he said, “on a
lonely road, miles from anywhere,
with a blazing ear. What do you
think I did?”
One weary listener stifled his
yawns long enough to reply:
“Took a long breath and blew it
out!”
The Questions
1. What is the only state in the
Union which is bounded by one
state alone?
2. Which of the following is a
natural magnet—Capstone, thun
derstone or lodestone?
3. What are known as cardinal
winds?
4. When was the boundary be
tween the United States and Can
ada finally determined?
5. What are the odors of the
principal gases that are used in
war?
6. How many shillings are there
in a British pound?
7. How small can diamonds be
cut?
8. Who said: “I know of no
method to secure the repeal of
bad or obnoxious laws so effective
as their stringent execution”?
9. In what city is the street
called the Strand?
The Answers
1. Maine.
2. Lodestone.
3. Winds blowing from due
north, east, south or west.
4. The boundary between the
United States and Canada was not
completely determined until 1925,
or 142 years after our country
signed the peace treaty with Eng
land.
5. As nearly as can be described,
mustard gas smells like garlic;
lewisite like geraniums; phosgene
' M TTERNS
SEWING CIRCLE
-pHERE’S something guileless
and appealing about a yoke
dress like this that will make you
look as fresh and bright as a little
girl all dressed up in a new
starched frock! It’s very becom
ing and youthifying to misses and
women alike. Yet design No. 8876
m --- ■ • - t- -• —
ASK ME O ™mzwf.Answ;rs I
ANOTHER f on Various Subjects
___ ^ -
like musty hay; and tear gas like
apple blossoms.
6. Twenty.
7. Some diamond cutters have
become so expert in cutting very
small diamonds for mass settings
that they produce regular 58-facet
stones so small that as many as
800 weigh only one carat.
8. Ulysses S. Grant (inaugural
address March 4, 1869).
9. London (from Fleet street to
Trafalgar square, parallel to and
near the Thames).
offers you the makings of a very
comfortable home style, with
waistline that you can comfortably
draw in ta just the slimness you
want, by means of the sash belt In
the back.
The high-cut skirt is very slen
derizing to the hips and waist. The
gathered bodice gi’ js you a nice
round bosom-line. Make this of
percale, calico or gingham and
trim with bright ricrac and but
tons. Untrimmed, it’s a good style
for runabout, if you make it up in
flat crepe or spun rayon. Send for
the pattern today, and be among
the first to wear it!
• • •
Pattern No. 8876 is designed for size*
12, 14, 16, 18, 20 and 40. Size 14 requires
3% yards of 36-inch material without nap;
l*a yards trimming. Detailed sew chart
Included. Send order to;
SEWING CIRCLE PATTERN DEPT.
Room 1324
211 W. Wacker Dr. Chicago
Enclose IS cents in coins for
Pattern No. Size.
Name .
Address .
Spanking Sportsmen
The lads of the Philippine islands
are tough. Their favorite game
is the slapping game, when one of
them sits on a bench, side on to his
opponent. The other lad steps up,
lashes out with a mighty slap on
the side.
Then the judges have a look at
the victim. If the blow has been
hard enough to make blood show
beneath the skin, the striker has
won. If not, he has to change
places with the other lad, who
takes a slap at him.
Spankings from mamma should
not worry these boys!
INDIGESTION
may affect the Heart
Gu trapped in the stomach or gullet maj act like ft
hair-trigger on the heart. At the first sign of (Ditresa
smart men and women depend on Bell-ana Tablets to
set gas free. No laxative but made of the fastest
acting medicines known for acid Indigestion. If th#
FIRST DOSE doesn't prove Dell-ans better, return
bottle to us tod receive DOUBLE Manor Back. 26c,
Our Vanity Hurt
That which makes the vanity of
others unbearable to us is that
which wounds our own. —«■ La
Rochefoucauld.
3* COLDS
quickfy u.11
LIQUID ' )
TABLETS
SALVE
NOS* DROPJ
COUCH DROPS
—
Duty Toward Health
To do all in our power to win
health, and to keep it, is as much
our duty as to be honest.—T. F.
Seward.
NAGGING BACKACHE
Modem life with Its ceaseless hurry
and worry, irregular habits, improper
eating and drinking, exposure, contagion
whatnot, keeps doctors busy, _
hospitals crowded. The alter
effects are disturbing to
the kidneys and oftentimes
people Buffer without know
ing that disordered kidney
action may cause the
trouble.
After colds, fever and
similar ills there is an in
crease of body impurities
the kidneys must filter from
the blood. If the kidneys
are overtaxed and fail to remove excess
acid and other harmful waste, there ia
poisoning of the whole system.
THE REASON DOAN’S
ARE FAMOUS
All over the country
grateful people tell
otherss “Doan*a have
helped me ; / recom
mend them to you,**
That is why we say,
Aak your neighbor /
Symptom* of disturbed kidney function
may be nagging backache, persistent head
ache, dizziness, getting up nights, swelling,
__ pulTinesa under the eyes—
a feeling of nervous anxiety
and loss of strength and
energy. Other signs of kid
ney or bladder disturbance
sometimes are burning,
scanty or too frequent urina
tion.
In such cases it is better
to rely on a medicine that
has won world-wide ap
proval than on something
less favorably known. Use
Doan’s Pills. They have been winning new
friends for more than forty years. Be sure
to get Doan's. Sold at all drug stores.
DOM’S PILLS
Dignity and Proportion
Remember this—that there is a
proper dignity and proportion to
be observed in the performance
of every act of life.—Marcus Au
relius.
THE SMOKE OF SLOWER-BURNING CAMELS GIVES YOU
EXTRA MILDNESS, EXTRA COOLNESS, EXTRA FLAVOR
■ LESSH
NICOTINE
than the average of the 4 other
largest-selling cigarettes tested —less than
any of them —according to independent
scientific tests of the smoke itself.
fP-* it's
SWELL TO GET THAT
EXTRA MILDNESS
‘ IN A SMOKE AS TASTY
AS A CAMEL. THERE'S
LNOTHING LIKE
A CAMEL FOR
FLAVOR
AMERICA’S No. 1 SKIER.
DICK DURRANCE
: Ml
THE
SMOKE’S
THE
THING!