Lincoln County tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1885-1890, June 09, 1888, Image 1

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kt. : . U 1 'V ' ThllT ... Resident, bier.
.'(UEu.. "-J ' , .. . - . ' - ! - - -- " ' " 1 1
STEVENS & BAKE, Prop's,
HE RMS
if paid hi Advance, only $1.00 per year.
: One Year, if not in Advance, 1.50.
iuuuius, in Advance, - - -Three
Months, in Advance, - -
Advertising Rates on- Application.
U. P. TJEnE TABLE.
GOING WEST 3KH7XTA1X TK1E.
vA 13Aail?nd,Press Dept. 8:1?. a. si.
NoFreiSht" " 8f.A. 3i.
No. 2l-RdRht". "
Stops only at Ogallala, jul'ekburg and Sidney on
Hard District.
GOING EAST.
v JPTCrW rjjGr Dcpt- r.:r a. a:.
-i 3Iail and Express 755 r. :,r.
btops only at Plam Creek, Kearney and Grand
. island os. Second District.
TDaily except Sunday.
J. C. Agent.
NESBITT & GRIMES,
Attorneys-at-Law,
NORTH PLATTE; - jyEBJJ.
OrilCE OVEtt J"oley Stobk. . v
C. M. DUNCAN, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon.
Oi'Ficz: Ottcnstein's Block, np ethirs. Oilice
hoars from ! to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 and 7 to p. in
liesidenco on "West Bistli Street.
NORTH PLATT3, - NEBRASKA.
A: J. LAPPEUS, M: D.,
Office in llinwan's Ulock, Spruce St.,
Docs a general practice. Chronic Dis
eases and Diseases of Wouiei a Specialt'.
IP. M GBAT,
Has now associated wilhLim Db. F. JL. Cart,
late ot Omaha, wlio is an cspert cro'.va and
bridge worker and a first-class operator.
All work will be guaranteed satisfactory and
prices moderate.
Oliice over Conway Sisters' Millinery Store.
NORTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA.
NOTIC3 TO TEACHERS.
.Notice is heraby given tSiat I will examine all
persons who may desire to offer themselves as
candidates for teachers o the common schools of.
i. this county on the TIIiKD TUESDAY of every
month.
i?. K. LAMCFORD,
Cocxrv Suit.
Prof. N. KLEIN,
Instruction on the Piano, Organ, Yiolin or any
Reed or Brass Instrument.
Tiauos carefuilj- tunetL Organs repaired.
NORTH PLATTE,
NEBRASKA.
BYSTAL . ICE
l,) ICE CREAiM.
r i. -
-.;-
.
Pure CiTstal Lake lee delivered in
any part of the city.
lee Cream made to order from pure
cieam and delivered.
LcavSkorflers with R. A. Douglas.
Wm. EDIS.
fDGBL A OTTfflSnHT,
GENERAL
Mm&l ul Ipsi Wurk.
Horse-Shoeing A Specialty.
Shop 011 West Front Street, west
of the Jail,
NOimi PLATTE, NEBRASKA.
Bismark Saloon
Billiard and Pool Hall,
J. C. HUPFER, Pbop..
Keeps none hut the finest "Whiskiesuch as
ROBINSON COUNTY, TENN.
GOON HOLLOW,
- ' M. V. JIONAliCJJ,
'J 0. F. G. TAYLOR.
G U OK EN HE 121 Ell It YE.
WELSH AND HOMESTEAD
Also line case goods, Brandies, Rum, Gin
Etc. St Louis Bottled Beer and
3Iihv.iukec Beer on draft.
Corner Sixth and Spruce Streets,
r jfoUTH PLATTE, - - NEBRASKA
GUY'S PLACE.
FIST-GLASS
Sample Eooni?
N L. HALL, Manager.
Having refitted our rooms
throughout, the public is invited t.o
call and see 11s.
ONLY
' :biioice Wines,"
; . : : iiquors and
Cigars
- i r 'iCcithVJJlock. Front Street, . ' - . .
jrOUtH PLATTE, - - NEBRASKA.
YOL. IT.
NORTH PLATTE, NEBRASKA, JUNE 9, 1888.
NO. 21
" NORTH PLATTE, NEB.
BiaicovLSit Good iTotcc
jjsaa. 053. dis-ttels-
.... a. .liAniAn mvan
, , .Accounts soUcitcd ana prompi, a"""'TntflrP8t
& Wall basiaeM entrusted to its care. Interest
iKUU VU.
2?JJEZj1& XjO-A-ZTnTS
Hade at the Yery Lowest Kates of Interest.
A'
i: -
i r
it ..
'iN'OW ON SALE
SUMMER
UITS
LIGHT AND AIRY.
Come in and look them over. They're nice.
. JL JLJ
P.AJi-A.OIij
r. -
ERSE COAL.
LUMB
LUMBER,
: SASH,
BLINDS,
DOORS, Etc.
LIME AMD CEMENT.
Eock Springs Nut,
Eock Springs Lump.
Pennsylvania Anthracite,
Colorado Anthracite
AND
Colorado Soft
YARD ON R. R. TR ACK WEST OF DEPOT,
HA! Hi! THE BEST OE ALL!
It did not take five years to discover that the
Jewel Grasoliiie Stove
was the only safe gasoline stove made, but in 1887, the first year it was
introduced in North Platte, FORTY-SIX were sold, more than was sold
of all others combined. We have them with either drop tank or the
pneumatic, and in the language of the poet, :lno pump to get out of or
der or gas forced through the room," but can prove that less gas escapes
from it than any stove made, and can show it has many points of supe
riority over all others and prove to you that the Jewel is
Ti,e : Best : Stove : -Mla-cie-
They are all guaranteed to give perfect satisfaction and will consume
less gasoline than any stove in the market. Call and examine the late
improved Jewel and be convinced and you will buv no other.
RESPECTFULLY,
Lv STRICKLER
1 Li i
GARFIEKD.
Plenty of rain in this sectiou of couutrj-.
The farmers are all behind with their
work this spring on account of so much
rain. And the amount of grain being
sown this year amountsto hundreds of
acres more than has ever been sown in
previous years.
Prairie schooners are arriving and leav
ing this port daily in numbers to numer
ous to mention.
Joseph Hall has sold his relinguiih
ment and skipped for Missouri and judg
ing from the song he was last heard to
sing, he does not iutendj to return . He
evidently was gohjg toee his best girl.
George Dillon has taken up his abode
ouhis.claimjind.i8,turR5g it all upside
down making the wiind ring with his
merry sougs while so jdoihg.
The ground squirrels:" are taking the
corn up pretty bad in this vicinity but Cy
Fox is shooting them ; ho has crippled
ono and singed the hair 'off from two
others, but it takes the fleetest of them to
get away from Will Craig especially if
they run cross ways of the rows of listed
corn so they will lose as much time jump
ing up as Will does when lie falls down.
Jake Miller says ho can run any team
down plowing on this -table if he had a
good riding plow, and the ground was
pretty' broken, so there wouldn't be too
much down hill plowing!
G. S. Tappan has beeu under the
weather for some time. lie thinks his
sickness is caused from eatipg grub cook
ed by fires made of frost bitten corn and
to convince people that, ho jielieves so lie
skipped for the J0ismaL);ind brought a
load of wood. "
C. C. Babcock is worrying considerable
for fear it will stop raining and his cab
bage crop will fail. , ' Fklteh.
SCHOOL NOTES..
UY THE COUNTY is UPT.
While penmanship is of the greatest
importance, especially to the business
man, it is a deplorable fact that it is of
tener neglected in our schoools than any
branch mentioned. in the course of stud-.
If it becomes necessary to omit, for want
of time, any of the studies, penmanship is
the one which suffers. The teacher dis
plays very little interest in it, the pupils
enter upon the time allowed for this
branch in the most listless manner pen
manship is under the 'ban. There are
various reasons which could be given for
the number of illegible pannien sent out
frorif"6ifr differenre1lucatiunai"Iustitii'-'
tiohs, but only two will be mentioned.
The first is that the carlessness, too fre
quently exhibited by the teacher, is com
municated to the pupil, the lesson is not
made interesting, untid' habits in this re
gard are formed, and a small amount of
time devoted to the subject is expended
in a manner nonproductive of a good re
sult. Vicious teaching is most damaging,
and is more dangerous fhan no instruc
tion. The second reason is that many of
the pupils have been early taught, through
the expressed opinions of others, that
skill in penmanship is a gift. While this
may be true to a certain extent, yet the
assertion should be very much qualified
for there is no one who chooses to make
the effort but can after a reasonable time,
learn to write a good business hand.
Teachers, note the fact, that the signs of
the times denote a change, the people,
patrons of our schools, are demanding it,
and, as the profession is noted for keep
ing abreast of the times, you as teachers,
cannot aiford to linger on the way, you
cannot afford to neglect this important
branch till harsher measures are adopted
to compel you to give it more attention.
An examination of teachers w:is con
ducted last Saturday in the central school
building at which seven applicants pre
sented themselves. Second grade certifi
cates were issued to Misses Cleland,
Babbit, Sullivan, Opal and Birdie Mc
Gauhey, and first grade to Misses Anna
Stolle and Bertha Thoelecke. So far as
the educational ability is concerned there
is no question but every one of these
young ladies is well qualified to teach.
Four of tliem have already been engaged
in the work, and no comment is necessary.
The other three are possessed of judg
ment, and should make good instructors .
There are only two things that the
teacher should fear fear yourself, and
fear to iullict a wrong. Those of us who
have been in the ranks for years, can
glance back into the past and recall in
stances where we thought we acted con
scientiously, and yec how very much dif
ferently would we work to bring about a
desired result, if we could but go over
our work again. Man' of us carry deep
down in our hearts a tinge of sadness for
some of the mistakes made, it may be ig
norantly, but still followed by disastrous
results.
"Of all sad words of tongue or pen
The saddest are these, 'It might have
been.' '
NEBRASKA.
Its Climate, Soil, Water, and Products.
'The healthfulness of Nebraska is uni-
VersaHycouceded- and very generally "
known. Ihb prevailing winds of the
prairie, an altitude of 1,250 feet above the
sea, the absence of swamps and lagoons,
the long genial summers, with bright
days and cool nights, give tone and health
to men and animals. On the smooth,
level roads of Nebraska, teams can haul
heavier loads, travel further in a given
length of time, end come out fresher af
ter a day's work, than in any of the east
ern states. The natural drainage of the
country is almost perfect, the frequent'
small streams, ravines, and "draws," and
the open porous structure of the subsoils
readily carry off the surplus : oistnre,
and excepting perhaps in a few of the
lowest bottoms, leave the soil available
for the cultivator, even after the heaviest
rains. The average rainfall is amply
sufiicient for growing crops and is well
distributed over the state.
THE SOIL.
The valleys and bottom lands, except
ing limited tracts of sand and light loam,
are rich black alluvial, from four to ten
feet deep, enormously productive and
practically inexhaustible. The high
prairies bordering the valleys have soils
composed of a dark, deep, rich and easily
worked. The soils of both valleys and
uplands rest upon beds of siliceous clays
which are open and porous in structure,
readily absorbing moisture and retaining
it through long seasons of dry weather,
enabling the lands to stand greater ex
cesses of rain and drouth than that of any
of the older states. No region of Amer
ica gives a wider range of production or
surer crops than in Nebraska. The soil
of Nebraska is of that peculiar composi
tion that will stand any kind of weather
or seasons, wet or dry, without damage to
crops, and yet it is wonderfully fertile.
Any crop that can be raised in any of the
middle states thrives well here .
STOCK KAISHNG.
Nebraska is one of the greatest hog
producing regions of the United States,
and a large portion of the pork and lard
used in the east comes from here. A
great share of the immense corn produce
of this state is used in fattening hogs, and
Nebraska hogs always command the
highest prices in eastern markets . This
state is also noted for its fine cattle. To
our weal tli in cattle and swine must b6
added the promising field in the raising
of the very best breeds of horses that is
being rapidly developed.
The state auditor says there are 1,332,
459 cattle, 1,199,230 hogs, 253,173 .sheep,
40,390 mules, and 432,630 horses in the
state. As this, is based on assessors', re
ports, the public can depend on there be-
Itlg at " least" "ohe-fourth imore than -thei
above figures. There has been a large in
crease in all -over 1836 except sheep,
which have fallen off over 60,000.
GOODS GIVEN AWAY!
Nebraska to-day can offer to the capi
talist, stock buyer and raiser, homeseeker,
better advantages than any western state.
She is developing into a grand "western
empire." Every year adds to her popu
lation, railroads and wealth. Her pio
neer counties are being rapidly inhabited
and placed under cultivation. Nebraska
is to be the second Empire State in the
United States.
THE TALKED OF DESERT.
The settlers throughout the western
part of Nebraska need scarcely feel any
solicitude in regard to the rain question.
It is the opinion of eastern people that we
are beyond the rain belt and that agri
cultural pursuits cannot be successfully
carried on without irrigation. How this
opinion gained such footing may be hard
to explain, but we think the most reason
able solution is this:
The first people of our race who inhab
ited this state were the cattle kings.
Their business represented an enormous
capital and an equally enormous profit.
In order to successfully carry it on it was
necessary to have vast tracts of land to
graze the herds. The knew that the tide
of immigration, once turned toward them,
would soon fill up their territory and
eventually result in the overthrow of
their business. Some action had to be
taken by which the people of the east
could be deceived and immigration to the
west effectually forestalled. To meet the
exigencies of the case the desert theory
was invented. It was industriously cir
culated throughout the east and was kept
persistently before the public mind for
years. The deception grew in time into
a fixed fact in the minds of those who, in
other matters, were worthy of better
judgment. It was incorporated in school
books and the Great American Desert
was marked on the geographical map.
Still the people of the east had to mi
grate. The western instinct was a char
acteristic of the race. Inch by inch they
crowded upon the desert. Foot by foot
they penetrated its remorseless sands.
As they progressed, the fact that some
ono had made a great mistake fastened
itself upon them. The sands receded so
fast that they never came in sight and the
new people walked on a carpet of grass.
The heavens and the soil yielded abun
dantly. The rains fell and the crops
grew as it were a garden instead of a de
sert. As the people pushed westward
they found the same conditions existing.
It was demonstrated in a few years that
theaveraEtannual rainfall jn.tthedesert-
was equal to that of any other part of the
Union. It was found to be true. Six
years ago the men who would have set
tled upon this table land would have been
considered crazy. A limited number of
the crazy ons settled here in 138L a still
greater number of the lunatics m 1885,
and in 1886, '87 and '88 multitudes of the
For a very little money and delivered
in any part of the City.
V,"
Oranges, thin-skin and juicy, per dozen,
Lemons, choice fruit, per dozen, :
12 pounds of Granulated Sugar all for
13 pounds of Extra "C" Sugar all for
14 pounds of Fine Prunes all for
12 pounds Fine Fancy Rice all for L.
4 pounds Arbuckle's Coffee all for.
8 Cans Tomatoes, good goods, all for :
40 cents.
.40 cents.
$1.00
1...... 1.00
5 1
8 Cans Sweet Corn, good goods, all for 1 :;...
25 Bars Good Soap all for : :
40 cents buys a pound of Uncolored' Japan Tea, others ask .
60 cents buys a pound of Fine Gunpowder Tea, others ask.
1.00
1.00
.... 1.00
..... 1.00
l.do
.... 1.00
deluded wretches swarmed into this cor
ner of the desert. With them, however,
came the clouds, and the ram and the
crops, and from them departed the sauds
and the hot winds. Farmers who used
their judgment and experience in putting
in their crops have harvested the fruits of
their labor.
The rainfall and melted snow of this
year up to May will approximate four
teen inches. The ground is well soaked.
All kinds of crops are above ground and
flourishing splendidly, and there is no
longer any reason whatever to doubt that
as an agricultural state, and that Frontier
county and this "great western" belt is a
success. Curtis Courier.
"Penny Wise and Pound Foolish."
That's what men are who plod along
trying to do their business, when they
feel half dead. Their eyes are dim and
throb; their hear aches; the children an
noy them ; their wives lose their charms ;
they lose their ambition; they make mis
takes in their accounts, and the whole
world looks blue ; they hate themselves
and everyone else. And why V If you
feel so, why don't you stop and think a
minute or are you too stupid? Your
liver and blood are out of order; that's all.
You need a good regulator ana tonic.
Take a bottle of Dr. Pierce's Golden Med
ical Discovery, and you will feel like a
new man. In three days your wife will
be the prettiest and sweetest woman in
the world ; your children's dispositions
will be exactly like your own . your busi
ness will improve, and you will make
money enough to pay for the "Golden
Medical Discovery" a hundred times over.
Don't be stubborn but try it.
If you suffer from "cold in the head,"
or from nasal catarrh, use Dr. Sage's
catarrh remedy. It cures when every
thing else fails.
.70 to
...50 to 60
80 cents.
We have the finest line oi California Canned Goods in the city.
M. C. Harrington, The First Ward Grocer
NOTICE.
The board of county commissioners will
meet on June 12, 1888, as a board of
equalization, and will continue in session
for the purpose of considering grievances
or complaints of excessive or unequal as
sessment for not more than twenty days
from said date.
All parties are notified hereby that they
must make their complaints known at
this sitting of the board, as no changes
can be considered after the levy is made.
By order of the Board of County Com
missioners. J. E. Evas,
County Clerk.
. NOTICE
Bids will be received up to noon of
June 23, 1888, at the county Clerk'f office
for the erection of a bridge across Cotton
wood Gulch on the public highway.
Bridge to be built with cedar posts and
mudsills, and to be twelve feet wide with
good railing. Each bid to be accompan
ied with specifications.
The commissioners reserve the right to
reject any or all bids.
J. i. XiVAXS, VU. UlL'tl.
Uw,
By order of the Board.
it